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Full text of "Epitome: Yearbook 1898"

Che Lehigh 6pitome. 




)c-: 

tots 

^J f . •. FOUNpeD JV ; 






publiehcd by the junior Clase of Lehigh Qniversity. 



^ 



Vol XXII. 



THE REPUBLIC PRESS 
NEW YORK 



TLO 

XTbe Hlumni ot tbe Xebigb tlniversit^, 

in grateful achnowle^gment 

of tbeir 

lo^alt^ auD oenerosit^ 

to tbeir 

Hlma flDater, 

tbis volume is respectfully ^eMcatet). 




John Bk<j\vn Lixd^iK'S'. |k. 

aesietant EOitoi=in=Cblet. 
Charles Edwaro Wkbstek, Jr. 

J6u6ine65 /Bianager, 
Herbert Myron Daggett. 

H55istant JBuslness /ftanacier. 
DAkcv Wentworth Roper. 

Bs»ociarc JEDitor^. 
David F. Castilla. 

^MES Ralph Farwell. 
Frank Haaimonu Glnsolus. 
Wentworth Greene Hare. 
Edward Darling Hillman. 

•LUMUND Harrison Symington. 




^:-^ !^^j:vj?^ 



J 



77 I ^ tiave endeavored in the preparation of this, the Twenty-second Volume 
ill of Thk Epitome, to preserve the most commendable qualities of the 
^"^ former Epitomes, and yet, by the introduction of some new features, 
to make it somewhat different from the previous editions For the furtherance 
of this plan, the arrangement of the subject matter, composing the book, has 
been somewhat changed, and a brief description of each Course, offered by 
the University, has been added Other changes that we have made will 
best be seen by the examination of the contents of the book. 

We attempted to interest the men, who served on former Epitome boards, 
in the publication this year. Our efforts, however, in that direction did not 
meet with very flattering success, but what responses we did receive were all 
the more appreciated. We have gone to great expense to have the artistic 
work in the Epitome as excellent as possible, and the half-tones of the Univer- 
sity buildings and Campus, we think, will add much to the appearance and 
permanent value of the book. 

This year of college life which is chronicled m the Ninety-Eight Epitome, 
has been a very important one in the history of Lehigh. Already, the bene- 
ficial results of Dr. Drown's wise and energetic administration of the affairs of 
the University, have been felt ; as is demonstrated by the large increase in 
numbers of the Freshman Class this year, as compared with the class that 
entered last year. The announcement has also been made that our Faculty is 
to be still further augmented and strengthened by the addition of a Chair of 
History and Political Economy. We wish to thank most heartily all who have 
as.sisted us, in any manner, in the preparation of this work ; and trusting that 
our labors will meet with the approval of the Faculty, Alumni and Under- 
graduates, we beg leave to present the Epitome of the Class of Ninety-Eight. 

THE EDITORS. 




1896. 
September 19, 21, 22, 
September 23, 
October 8, 
November 26, 
December 23, 

1S97. 
January 4, SX -^ ^i-, 
January 16, 
January 29, . 
February i, 2, 3, 
February 4, S'X a.m., 
February 22, 
March 3, 
April 14, . 
April 21, 
May 22, 
May 26, 
June 7, 
June g, 
June 13, . 
June 14, 
June 15, . 
June 16, 
June 17, iS, 19, 

September 18, 20, 21, . 
September 22, 
October 14, 
December 22, 

189S. 
January 3, 8^ a.m., 
January 31, February i, 2, 
Febniary 3, 
June 15, . 



Examinations for Admission. 

First Term begins. 

Founder's Day. 

Thanksgiving Day. 

Christmas Holidays begin. 

Christmas Holidays end. 
Junior Prize Orations due. 

First Term ends. 

Examinations for Admission to Second Term. 

Second Term begins. 

Washington's Birthday. 

Ash Wednesday. 

Easter Holidays begin . 

Easter Holidays end. 

University Day Orations due. 

Senior Examinations begin 

.\nnual Examinations begin. 

Graduation Theses due. 

Baccalaureate Sunday. 

Class Day. 

Alumni Day. 

University Day. 

Examinations for Admission. 

1897=1898. 

. Examinations for Admission. 

First Term begins. 

Founder's Day. 

Christmas Holidays begin. 

. Christmas Holidays end. 

Examinations for Admission to Second Term. 

Second Term begins. 

University Day. 



Lcbigb Qnmreit)). 

Founded in 1865, by Hon. Asa Packer. 
Incorporated in 1866, under the Laws of Pennsylvania. 



/IDOttO. 

Hovio Minister et Interpres Naturce. 



CoUeoe Colors. 

Seal Brown and White. 

Colleoe lt)ell5. 

Hoo, Rah, Ray! Hi! Hi! 

Hoo, Rah, Ray! Ferdom si! 

Ray, Ray, Ray! Gook Amole do! 

Lehigh! Der Lehigh! 

Lehigh ! 

Lehigh ! 

Kemo kimo der ein mal, mehe meha ma rump stump 
pumpinickle soup pack tiddle wink come a nip cap sing a 

song a POLLY won't YOU KIMO ! 

Lehigh ! 
Lehigh!! 
Lehigh! !! 



T 



HEBDARnDFTRUSTEEc;. 




The.Rt. Rev. X. Somerville Rulisox, D.D. 
Robert H. Savre. ..... 

William H. Sayre, .... 

Elisha p. Wilbur, ..... 

James I. Blakslee, .... 

Charles Hartshorxe, .... 

Henry S. Drinker, .... 

Robert P. Lindermax, 

(two vacancies.) 



South Bethlehem. 

South Bethlehem. 

South Bethlehem. 

South Bethlehem. 

Mauch Chunk. 

Philadelphia. 

Philadelphia, 

South Bethlehem. 



Ibonorar^ ITrustees. 

The Rt. Rev. Leighton Coleman, S.T.D., Wilmington, Del. 

Charles Brodhead, Bethlehem. 

W. L. CoNYNGHAM, Wilkes-Barrc. 

Charles O. vSkeer, Mauch Chunk. 

The Rev. Marcus A. Tolman, . . . Mauch Chunk. 
The Hon. Henry Green, Easton. 

Ibonorarp Blumni Urustees. 

term expires. 
W. H. Baker, A.C, M.D., Class of 1873, 1897, Philadelphia. 
Thomas M. Eynon, M.E., Class of 1881, 1898, Philadelphia. 

Henry R. Price, C.E., M.D., Class of 1870, 1899, Brooklyn, N.Y. 
W. Arthur Lathrop, C.E., Class of 1875, 1900, Wilkes-Barre. 

©fficers of tbe :i6oar&. 

President, 
The Rt. Rev. Nelson Somerville Rulison, D.D. 

Secretary, 
\ Elisha p. Wilbur. 

Treasurer of the University, 
Elisha P. Wilbur. 

]£jecutiv>e Committee. 

Robert H. Sayre, Chairman, 

The President of the Board of Trustees, 

Elisha P. Wilbur, Henry S. Drinker, 

James I. Blakslee, William H. Sayre, 

R. Morris Gummere, Secretary. 

13 



Xibrarp Committee. 

The Director of the Library, Chairman, 

The President of the Board of Trustees, 

The President of the University, 

Elisha p. Wilbur. Robert P. Linderman. 

Committee o\\ iKuil^ings an& Orounbs. 

Elisha P. Wilbur, Chairvian, 
Robert H. Sayre. William H. Sayre. 

Committee o\\ College administration. 

Henry S. Drinker, CJiairnian, 
William H. Sayre, Robert P. Linderman. 



m^^ 



14 



THE 




President of the University, 

THOMAS MESSINGER DROWN, 

University of Pennsylvania, '62; Student in Freiberg, Saxony, Mining 
School and University of Heidelberg, i865-'68 ; In- 
structor in Metallurgy', Harvard University, iSGg-'yo; 
Professor of Analytical Chemistry, Lafayette College, 
i874-'8i; Secretary and Editor of the Transactions of 
American Institute of Mining Engineers, i87i-'84; 
Professor of Analytical Chemistry, Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology, iSSs-'gs; Chemist Massachusetts 
State Board of Health, 1887-95 ; Member of American 
Philosophical Society, Philadelphia ; Academy of Nat- 
ural Sciences, Philadelphia ; American Academy of 
Arts and Sciences, Boston; Boston Society of Civil 
P2ngineers ; New England Water-Works Association ; 
American Chemical Society ; Iron and Steel Institute, 
England; Society for Chemical Industry. England; 
Honorary Member American Institute of Mining Engi- 
neers; President American Institute of Mining Engineers; Berzelius 
Society, Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University. 

University Park, South Bethlehem. 




15 



Professor of Chciuistry, 

WILLIAM HENRY CHANDLER, F.C.S., 

A.B., A.M., Union College, "62 ; A.M., Columbia College, '71 ; Ph. D., 
Hamilton College, '72; Member of American Chemical Society: London 
Chemical Society; Societe Chemique de Paris; American A.ssociation for 
the Advancement of Science; K A. 

251 Cherokee Street, vSouth Bethlehem. 



Professor of Mineralogy and Metallurgy^ 
BENJAMIN W. FRAZIER, 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania, '59; Member American Institute of 
Mining Engineers ; Member American Philosophical vSociety ; Fellow 
American Association for the Advancement of Science. 

University Park, South Bethlehem. 



Professor of Physies and Eleetrical Engineerings 

HUGH WILSON HARDING, 
A.B., Washington, "54 ; A.M., Bethany College \ ^ F A. 

745 Delaware Ave., vSoiith Bethlehem. 

Professor of Civil Engineerings 

MANSFIELD MERRIMAN, 

Ph. B., Yale Sheffield Scientific School, '71; C.E., Yale Sheffield Scientific 
School, '72; Ph.D., Yale Sheffield Scientific School, '77: President 
of the Society for the Promotion of Engineering Education. 

L^niversity Park. South Bethlehem. 

Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures, and of History, 

SEVERIN RINGER, 

U.J.D., University of Cracow, 42. 

424 New Street, South Bethlehem. 

16 



Professo?' of Mining Engineering and Geology, 

EDWARD HIGGINSON WILLIAMS, Jr., 

B. A., Yale, '72; A.C., Lehigh, '75; E.M., Lehigh, '76; F.G.S.A. (Original 
Fellow) ; Honorary Member ^ B K, Zeta Chapter (New York) ; Fellow, 
American Association Advancement of Science; Member of American 
Institute of Mining Engineers; A founder oi T B U, W T. 

1 1 7 Church Street, Bethlehem. 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 

JOSEPH F. KLEIN, 

Ph.B., Yale, '71; D.E., Yale, '73; American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 

357 Market Street, Bethlehem. 

Professor of Greek Language and Literature, and Secretary of the 

Faculty, 

WILLIAM ANDREW ROBINSON, 
College of New Jersey, A.B., '81; A.M., '84; $ B K. 

St. Luke's Place, South Bethlehem. 

Professor of Latin Language and Literature, 

EDMUND MORRIS HYDE, 

Trinity College, B.A, and M.A. ; Yale, Ph.D.; Ursinus College, L.H.D., 
Member of the American Philological Society ; $ B K; W T. 

326 Wyandotte Street, South Bethlehem. 
Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy, 



Professor of ALat hematics and Astronomy, 

CHARLES LEWIS THORNBURG, 
Vanderbilt University, B.S., '81; B.E., '82; C.E , 'S3; Ph.D., '84; B S H. 

308 Packer Avenue, South Bethlehem. 
17 



Professor of the English Language and Literature, 

WILLIAM C. THAYER, 

Columbia, B.A., '76; Williams, M.A., '84; Student, University of Gottingen, 
'79-80; Graduate Scholar, Johns Hopkins University, '81; Professor 
Mathematics, Hobart, '82-83; Fellow of Courtesy, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, '84 and '88 ; Instructor in Modern Languages, Baltimore, '88-'9i ; 
Professor Modern Languages, Pennsylvania State College, '92-95. 



Xecturers. 

/« Charge of the Department of Electrical Engirieering, 

ALEXANDER MACFARLAXE, LL.D., 

M.A. , L^niversity of Edinburgh, Scotland, '75; D.Sc, University of Edin- 
burgh, Scotland, '78; Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, '78; Mem- 
ber of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, '92 ; Fellow of the 
American Association for the Advancement of Science, '86; Member of 
the American Mathematical Society, '91 ; Corresponding Member of the 
Sociedad Cientifica, Mexico, '94; Correspondmg Member of the Circolo 
ilatematico di Palermo, Italy, '95. 

St. Luke's Place, South Bethlehem. 
Lecturer on Physiology and Hygiene, 

WILLIAM L. ESTES, M.D , 

A.M., Bethel College; M.D., University of Virginia, '77; M.D., University of 
City of New York, '78; Fellow of the American Academy of Medicine; 
Fellow of the American Surgical Society; Member of the American 
Medical Association ; Permanent Member of Pennsylvania State Medical 
Society; Charter Member of American Academy of Railway Surgeons; 
Member of Lehigh Valley Medical Association of Railway Surgeons; 
Member of the Northampton County Medical Society; #. F. A. 

J- 

llnetructore anb Besistante. 

Instructor in Mathematics, 

ARTHUR E. MEAKER, 
C.E., Lehigh University, '75. 

514 Cherokee Street, South Bethlehem. 
18 



Instructor in MatJiematics^ 

PRESTON ALBERT LAMBERT, 
B.A., Lehigh, '83; M.A., Lehigh, '91; W T. 

215 South Centre Street, Bethlehem. 

Instructor in Metallurgy, Mineralogy, and Bloiupiping, 

JOSEPH W. RICHARDS, 

A.C., Lehigh University, '86; M.A., Philadelphia High School, '87; M.S., 
Lehigh University, '90; Ph.D., Lehigh University, '93; Member of the 
T B U; President of the Chemical Section of the Franklin Institute. 

203 Church Street, Bethlehem. 

In St met or in English, 

LEWIS BUCKLEY SEMPLE, 
B.A., Lehigh, '84; M.A., Lehigh, '91; Ph.D., Princeton, '94; $ B K. W T. 

17 North Street, Bethlehem. 

Instructor in Civil Engineering, 

RALPH M. WILCOX, 
Ph.B., Yale Sheffield Scientific School, '88. 

28 South Maple Street, Bethlehem, 

Instructor in Civil Engineering, 

JOHN P. BROOKS, 

M.S., Dartmouth. 

201 West Broad Street, Bethlehem. 

Instructor in Modern Languages, 

ROBERT FERGUSON, 

A.B., Columbia College, '83; $B K. 

Chestnut Street, South Bethlehem. 

19 



Instructor iti Drawing and Architecture, 

FREDERIC C. BIGGIN, 
B.S., Cornell University, '92. 

West Broad Street, Bethlehem. 

Instructor in Qualitative Ajia/j'sis, Assayiiig and Industrial 

Chemistry, 

FREDERICK W. SPAXUTIUS, 

M.S., Ohio State University ; Ph. B., Sheffield Scientific School. 

315 Church Street, Bethlehem. 

WILLIAM B. SHOBER, 

B.S.. 86, St. John's College; A.M., '90, St. John's College; Ph.D., 92, Johns 
Hopkins Universitj- ; Member of the German Chemical Society ; Member 
of the American Chemical Society ; Member of the Chemical Society 
of Lehigh University \ S A X. 

464 Xew Street, South Bethlehem. 

Instructor in Geology and LitJiology, 

HERMAN EUGENE KIEFER, 
A.C., Lehigh, '92 ; M.S., Lehigh, '94 ; Ph.D., Lehigh, '96. 

:6 West Fourth Street, South Bethlehem. 

Instructor in Mining and Metallurgy, 

JOSEPH BARRELL, 
B.S., Lehigh University, '92 ; E. M., Lehigh University, '93. 

16 West Fourth Street. South Bethlehem. 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, 

ROBERT C. H. HECK, 

M.E., Lehigh L'niversity, 93. 

422 Cherokee Street. South Bethlehem. 



Instructor hi Modern Languages, 

J. GRANT CRA:\[ER, 

A.B.. Univ^ersitv of the City of New York. M.A., Honorary member 
" Clio," Prin'ceton, B S 11. 

603 Pawnee Street, Sotith Bethlehem. 

Instructor in Quajititativc Analysis, 

HARRY M. ULLMAX, 

A.B., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University ; American Chemical Society ; Deutsche 
Chemische Gesellschaft; (:) /} X. 

148 Sotith Main Street, Bethlehem. 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering, 

J. HENRY KLINCK, 
M.E., Cornell, '94: Member .\ I. E. E. 

440 Cherokee Street, South Bethlehem. 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering, 

HENRY STORRS WEBB, 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 92; American Institute Elec 
trical Engineers ; A T. 

411 Cherokee Street, South Bethlehem. 

Instructor in Mathematics and Astronomy, 

JOHN HUTCH ESON OGBURN, 

C.E., University of the City of New York; B S 11. 

317 West Packer Avenue, South Bethlehem. 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, 

BARRY^ HOLME JONES, 

B.S., '94, Lehigh; E.M., '95, Lehigh. 

Sun Inn. Bethlehem. 



Instructor in Mechanical Enginccri^ig, 

LEOPOLD OLIVIER DAXSE, 

M.E., Western University. 

250 Wall Street, Bethlehem. 

Instructor in Physics, 

SCHUYLER S. CLARK, 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, '95. 

505 West Fourth Street, South Bethlehem. 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering, 

ROBERT B WILLL\MSOX, 
iI.E., Cornell, '93; .2 ^. 

505 West Fourth Street, South Bethlehem. 

Assistant in Civil Engineering, 
* WILLL-\M H. HOFFMAN, B.C.E. 

As si it ant in English, 

XATT MORRALL EMERY, 
A.B., Dartmouth, '95 ; ^ B K, '95 ; K K K; Casque and Gauntlet. 

American House, Bethlehem. 



* Absent on leave. 



1Flon:*1Re9i^ent Xecturere for tbe l^ears 1896*07, 

January jo, i8g6. 
RossiTER W. Raymond, Ph.D., Secretary of American Institute of Mining 

Engineers, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

" The Nature and Force of the Mineral Land Patents of the United States.'' 

March 26, iSg6. 

Russell W. Davenport, Vice-President, Bethlehem Iron Company, 

South Bethlehem, Pa. 

" Armor Plate.'' 

April 9, i8g6. 

C. H. Bedell, Electro-Dynamic Company. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

" Practical Points on the Designing of Dynamos." 

April 24^ i8g6. 
E. D. Leavitt, Consulting Engineer of the Calumet and Hecla Mining 
Company, Cambridge, Mass. 

" A Modern Mining Plant." 
May /, i8g6. 
Hon. C. Stuart Patterson, Dean of University of Pennsylvania Law School; 
Chairman of Sound Money League of Pennsylvania, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
"The Gold Standard of Value." 
May 22, i8g6. 
W. T. Sedgewick, Professor of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology ; Biologist, Massachusetts State Board of Health, 
Boston, Mass. 
" Germs as Friends and Foes." 
November ig, i8g6. 
Charles B. Dudley, Ph.D., Chemist, Pennsylvania Railroad, 
Altoona, Pa. 
" Lubrication." 
January 14, i8gj. 
C. E. Webster, C.E., Chief Engineer, Lehigh Valley Railroad. 
South Betlehem, Pa. 
" The Inspection of Railroads.'' 

February ^j, i8gj. 
Charles McMillan, C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering in Princeton Uni- 
versity, Princeton, N. J. 
" Filtration of Nitrogenous Matter through Sterile Material." 

23 



Ube packer nDetnorial Cburcb. 

Chaplain, 
******** 

Organist, 

J. FRED WOLLE, 

148 Church Street, Bethlehem. 

G^mnasium. 

Instriictor, 

C. W. SMITH, 

750 Cherokee Street, South Bethlehem. 

J- 



Xibrar^. 



Director, 
WM. H. CHANDLER, Ph.D., 

251 Cherokee Street, South Bethlehem. 

Chief Cataloguer, 

A. W. STERNER, 

116 N. High Street, Bethlehem. 

Cataloguing Clerk, 

WILSON F. STAUFFER, 

517 Pawnee Street, South Bethlehem. 

Shelf Clerk, 

PETER F. STAUFFER, 

520 Broad Street, South Bethlehem. 

25 



Catalogue of Stubents. 



j^ 



6ra^uate Stu^ent0. 



Wm. N. R. Ashmead, B.A , 
Henry M. S. Cressman, B.A., 
Eckley S. Cunningham, M.E., 
Walter Joseph Dech, B.A., 
Charles M. Douglas, B.A., 
Thomas Joseph Gannon. M.E., 
William H. Hoffman, B.C.E., 
Elmer Augustus Jacoby, B.A., 
Charles Lincoln Keller, M.E., 
William Allen Lambert, B.A. , 
Harry K. Landis, B.S., E.M , 
E. Williamson Miller, B.S., 
Harlan Sherman Miner, A.C. , 
Howard Segar Neiman, A.C, 
David Kirk Nicholson, M.E., 
Samuel Arthur Rhodes, E.E., 
Ira A. Shinier, B.A. , 
John Eugene Stocker, B.S., 
John Augustus Thomson, B.S., 



■or Degree. 


Residence. 


M.A., 


Philadelphia, 


M.A., 


Egg Harbor City, N. J 


M.S., 


Drifton 


M.A., 


Bethlehem. 


M.A., 


New York City, 


* 


South Bethlehem, 


M.S., 


Lafayette, Ind, 


M.A, 


Bethlehem. 


M.S., 


Chicago, 111. 


M.A., 


Philadelphia. 


M.S., 


New York City. 


E.M., 


Bethlehem. 


M.S., 


Gloucester, N. J. 


M.S., 


Albany, N. Y. 


M.S., 


Braddock. 


M.S., 


Austin, 111. 


M.A., 


Philadelphia. 


M.S., 


Upper Alton, 111. 


E.M., 


Summit Point, W. Va. 



Special Students. 



Thomas Micks Clinton, ^T A, E.E., 

1529 Eutaw PI., Baltimore, Md. 

George Duncan Heisey, W T, E.M. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 

Francis Betts Smith, S /I X, M.E., 

Hartford, Conn. 

Brigham Smoot, X W, A.C, 

Provo City, Utah. 

Harry Wellington Thatcher, A.C, 

* Not candidate for a degree. 



>^ r A House, B. 

W T House, Market St., B. 

703 Dakota St., S. B. 

A' W Lodge, 510 Seneca St., S. B. 

South Bethlehem. 



26 



r"%^^ 






cy, 




Prf^Ara^P^tfrr , 



Senior Claee* 



^ 



ilBOttO. 
lit Nihilo Nihil fit. 



'07 



Class Colors. 
Old Gold and White. 



Class Uell. 
Rexty Rah! 
Rah, Hoo, Rev en ! 
Lehigh^ Lehigh ! 
'97-' 



©fficcrs. 



Samuel Palmer Senior, 
Thaddeus Merrimax, 
Thomas Cedwyn Thomas, 
Lawrence Rust Lee, 
Wallace Treichler, 
John Boyt, 



President. 
Vice-President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 
Historian. 
Athletic Representative. 



27 




Co one unacquainted with college life the history of any particu- 
lar class differs but slightly from that of others. But it is to 
the individual member of the class that the events of each 
college year, whether pleasant or otherwise, become a history 
dear to him, by virtue of the more or less active part he may 
have taken in them. These are so indelibly stamped on h"s 
memory that they can never be effaced. In fact, they have 
become a part of him, for the interest and zeal with which he 
entered into them will be characteristics of his future life. In 
recording the events that will become history to us, we are 
tempted to wander back to that bright day in the early fall, when 
that happy throng of some ninety men were ushered in as 
students of the University. Little did we realize then what trials 
were in store for us, and what perseverance would be required in 
overcoming them. 

As Freshmen, we made a very favorable record, accomplish- 
ing everything that could have been expected from a class so 
small in numbers. Perhaps some of us did border on the edge of 
verdancy, and others may have partaken of their proportionate 

28 



amount of the proverbial " vin-de-vache "; but we would emphat- 
ically state that there have been others since then. 

The transition from Freshmen to Sophomores followed as a 
natural sequence. ^Vith it came an innumerable host of new 
difficulties. There were but two main thoughts to occupy the 
mind of the busy Sophomore — how to make life as miserable as 
possible for the Freshmen, and the next day's lesson — math. 
Who among- us does not recall the many hours spent in pursuit 
of that elusive Queen of the Asymptotes, sacred to analytics, 
and the still more tedious work involved in Calculus. How often 
after an interview with that genial oracle to whom all things 
were easy, had we concluded that our idea of the subject was 
infinitesimally small. How often after making a cold flunk did 
thoughts come to us that might be expressed as follows: 

One sadly solemn thought 

Comes to me o'er and o'er; 
The math. I struck to-day 

Was harder than e'er before 

With the end of the year came the end of our troubles, and 
we gave vent to our feelings by sentencing King Calculus to death 
by cremation. Those who may have pursued fancies of a differ- 
ent nature found it advisable to repeat the year, and were num- 
bered with us no more. 

Our Junior year proved to be the most pleasant and enjoy- 
able of our college course, for with it came the relaxation from the 
toilsome laborings in mathematics. At the same time w^e 
assumed new responsibilities and new duties which strengthened 
and disciplined us for the graver duties of Seniority. This year 
was made all the more memorable by the publication of our 
Epitome, and the holding of our June Hop, the most successful 
both socially and financially, ever given at the University. 

Much has been said of our seeming lack of spirit. 'Tis true, 
we have lost much of the vim and dash with which we distin- 
guished ourselves in our Freshman year. Yet on reflection it 
can be proven that we have shown as much and more spirit than 



other classes. Considering the small number of our class, we 
have contributed our proportion of athletes to all 'Varsity teams. 
Twice have we won the banner in the Winter meet, while statis- 
tics will show that we have supported our teams better financially 
than any class in college. 

We are not permitted to enumerate those who, like Yates, 
have won distinction in college athletics, or those who, like Hale, 
have left us to enter into active business. Up to the present time 
we have always looked forward eagerly to the completion of our 
college hfe. With what dismal forebodings did we enter upon it, 
and how wearily did those years drag themselves along ! Yet on 
reflection it seems but a day, a day of glorious sunshine marred 
onh^ here and there by a cloud of disappointment. Too soon will 
we be compelled to enter upon the sterner and harsher duties of 
life. Let our efforts be such that, however humble our calling 
may be, they will tend to an ennobling influence and redound to 
the honor of our dear old Alma Mater. 

The Historian. 



^^> 

^5^^ 



30 




FRONT VIEW OF LIBRARY. 



Seniors. 

Francis DuPont Ammen, B (~J n, Mechanical Engineering, 

427 Cherokee St. vSoiith Bethlehem. 
21 Columbia Ave., Ammendale, ]\Id. 

Lehigh Burr, '96, '97; Mustard and Cheese, '95, '96; Treasurer of 
Mustard and Cheese, '96, '97; Epitome Board; Engineering So- 
ciety, '95, '96, '97; Sword and Crescent; Member of F. F. G. 

Henry Jonathan Biddle Baird, k A, Mining Engineering, 

K A House, South Bethlehem. 
31 Virginia Ave., West Chester, Pa. 
Sophomore Cotillion Club ; T B U. 

Lathrop Hutchings Baldwin, k A, Mechanical Engineering, 

307 N. Fourth St., Allentown, Pa. 
Brush Club, '93, '94; Tug-of-War, Freshman Team; Member of 
F. F. G. ; Engineering Society. 

Charles Marshall Barton, ^ $^ Civil Engineering, 

Pikesville, Md. 'Sigma Phi Place, South Bethlehem. 

Sword and Crescent; Engineering Society, C. E. Section; Sopho- 
more Cotillion Club; Freshman Banquet Committee; Sound- 
Money League. 

Frank Breckenridge Bell, :2N, Mechanical Engineering, 

Mercer, Pa., 714 Cherokee St., South Bethlehem. 

Member of F. F. G. ; ^Mechanical Engineering Society. 

Harry Layfield Bell, B G U' Electrical Engineering, 

B & n House, South Bethlehem. 

Poplar Hall, Broad Creek, Princess Anne Co., Va. 

Sophomore Cotillion Club; Class Historian, Sophomore year; Le- 
high Brn-r Board, '95/96, Editor-in-Chief, '96. '97; Mustard and 
Cheese; Eighteen Club; Junior German Committee; June Hop 
Committee ; Sword and Crescent. 

William Ragan Binkley, Electrical Engineering, 

Hagerstown, Md. 338 Vine St., South Bethlehem. 

TBn- Treasurer of T B 11 : President of the Electrical En- 
gineering Society; Honor Court; Mathematical Club; Agora; 
Christmas Hall Board; Roll of Honor; Salutatorian. 

Bertine Frederic Borhek, Analytical Chemistry, 

West Bethlehem, 

32 



Charles Schwartze Bowers, ^ j Q, Electrical Engineering, 

$ /S S House, South Bethlehem. 
1606 North Fifteenth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

TBn\ YoodGimel; Toast, Junior Banquet; Assistant Business 
Manager, Burr, '96, '97 ; Honor Roll. 

John Boyt, /} r. Mining Engineering, 

Adamsford, Pa. ^ r House, South Bethlehem. 

T B n ; Junior Class Supper Committee ; Toast, Junior Class 
Supper; Brown and White Board, '95, '97, Editor-in-Chief '96 
'97; '97 Epitome Board; Senior Class Athletic Representative- 
Secretary Athletic Committee; Track Team, '95; Lacrosse Team' 
'96, '97 ; Mathematical Club. ' ' 

Wilham Burke Brady, WT, Mechanical Engineering, 

28 Market St!, Bethlehem. 
510 N. Second St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Secretary of Class, Freshman Year; Class Baseball and Football 
Teams, '93, '94, and '94, '95; QNE; Sophomore Cotillion Club; 
Yood Gimel; Junior German Committee; Calculus Cremation 
Committee ; Honor Court, '94/95 ; TB 11; 'Varsity Football Eleven 
'96; Member of F. F. G. 

Walter Everette Brown, Electrical Engineering, 

Stamford, Conn. 19 Cedar St., Bethlehem. 

Honor Roll; Wilbur Prize in French; Valedictorian; Wilbur 
Scholar. 

Sinclair Wiggins Chiles, z/ T, Civil Engineering, 

Sims City, Fla. j j" House South Bethlehem. 

Thomas Holland Clagett, Metallurgy, 

Berryville, Va. 458 Chestnut St., South Bethlehem. 

Engineering Society. 

Barton Olmstead Curtis, z/ T, Civil Engineering, 

Monona, Iowa. . j j" House, vSouth Bethlehem. 

Patrick Edward Dinan, Analytical Chemistry, 

2.30 E. Third St., South Bethlehem. 

Louis Diven, w T, Electrical Engineering, 

957 Lake St., Elmira, N. Y. 28 Market St., Bethlehem. 

ONE; Sword and Crescent; Brown and White Board, '94, '95. 

Benjamin Irvin Drake, Q A X, Mining Engineering, 

Chicago, 111. Eagle Hotel, Bethlehem. 

33 



ClifiEord George Dunnells, A T, Civil Engineering, 

A T House, South Bethlehem. 
1 20 Sixth St., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Burr Board. '95; '97 Epito.me Board; Tennis Association, Vice- 
President Senior Year; Engineering Society; Forum; Ciaess 
Club, President Senior Year; Assistant Manager of the Lacrosse 
Team, '96. 

Stuart Rhett Elliott, 'E ^, Mining Engineering, 

Beaufort, S. C. :§• # House, South Bethlehem. 

Sophomore Cotillion Club; Sword and Crescent; June Hop Com- 
mittee ; Freshman and Sophomore Football Teams. 

Albert Andrew Finkh, Mechanical Engineering, 

223 South New St., Bethlehem. 
2i4Woodworth Ave., Yonkers, X. Y. 
Engineering Society. 

Ira D. Fulmer, Electrical Engineering, 

Richland Centre, Pa. 14 East Fourth St., South Bethlehem. 

Francisco Martinez Gallardo, Mechanical Engineering, 

314 Brodhead Ave., South Bethlehem. 
17 Santuario St., Guadalajara, Mexico. 
M. E. Section of Engineering Society; Member of F. F. G. 

Orrin Satterlee Good, 2 zv^ Electrical Engineering, 

Lock Haven, Pa. ^ A' House, South Bethlehem. 

E E. Society, Treasurer; S. C. C. 

Ralph Scofield Griswold, Electrical Engineering, 

338 Vine St., South Bethlehem. 
Central Ave. and Maple St., Madison, N. Y. 

Honor Court, '96; E. E. Society; L. U. C. A., President, '96, '97; 
Agora ; Forum ; Brown and White Board, '96, '97 ; T B 11; Honor 
Roll. 

John Lewis Gross, # 7^ a, Mechanical Engineering, 

^ r A House, Bethlehem. 
63 North St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Sophomore Cotillion Club; Banjo Club; F. F. G. ; Engineering 
Society; L. U. Minstrels. 

William Thomas Hanly, Civil Engineering, 

314 Brodhead Ave., South Bethlehem. 
1802 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
C. E. Society; Forum. 

34 



William Stephen Hiester, & a X, Electrical Engineering, 

^T 1 o n r. e ^ X House, Bethlehem. 

813 North Second St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Ross Nathaniel Hood Electrical Engineering, 

,, 1 , c. T^ 523 Cherokee St., South Bethlehem. 

Market St., Duncannon, Pa. 

Oliver Zell Howard, a X, Mechanical Engineering 

Hagerstown, Md. 237 Broad St.,' Bethlehem. 

Henry Taylor Irwin, x $, Mechanical Engineerino- 

Allegheny City, Pa. x $ House, South Bethlehem 

Sword and Crescent; Arcadia; Eighteen Club ;i5'z/rr Board 'q^ 'q6 
97; 97 Epitome Board; Mustard and Cheese, Assistant Manager' 
96, Manager 97; Manager Lacrosse Team, '97; Class Historian' 
Junior Year; Tennis Association ; Engineering Society. 

Arthur Perkins Jenks, ^ r J, Electrical Engineering, 

TT- o. T., •, . , , . ^ r J House, Bethlehem. 

2105 Vme St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sophomore Cotillion Club; June Hop Committee; E E Soci 
ety; Tennis Association. . • • out.i- 

Harry Sackett Johnson, e A X, Electrical Engineering 

Main St., East Aurora, N. Y. sAX House, Bethtehem. 

Yood Gimel; Class Football Team, Freshman and Sophomore 
Years; Class Tug-of-War Team ; Substitute, '96 'Varsity Football 
Team; Toast, Freshman Class Supper; Chairman Sophomore Ban. 
quet Committee; Toastmaster, junior Banquet: Calculus Crema- 
tion Committee; Sophomore Cotillion Club; President of '07 
Junior_ Year; Chairman June Hop Committee; Electrical Enl 
gmeering Society; L. U Minstrels, '96. 

Lawrence Rust Lee, a $, Mechanical Engineering 

Shepherdstown, W. Va. j $ House, Soith Bethlehem. 

Glee Club, '93-94 ; Choir, '93, '94, '95. '96 ; Sophomore Cotillion Club • 
Mustard and Cheese, '95, '96, Secretary, '96, '97; Gun Club; Treas- 
urer, Senior Class. j! y > y>' 

Telford Lewis, # r J, Mining Engineerino- 

Blairsville, Pa. /^ ^ House, Bethlehem. 

Charles Victor Livingstone, Electrical Engineering 

Kingston, N. Y. South Bethlehem. 

Arthur Frost Loomis, x W, Electrical Engineering 

19 Cherry St., Oneida, N. Y. xw House, South Bethlehem. 
J",^/^'' President, Mathematical Club, '96, '97; Vice-President 
Electrical Engineering Society, '96, '97; Honor K0II. ' 



35 



Barry MacXutt, B & U, Electrical Eng-ineering-, 

27 South Linden St., Bethlehem. 
Electrical Engineering Society ; Sophomore Cotillion Club. 

James Gordon Mason, K A, Mining Engineering, 

West Pittston, Pa. k A House, South Bethlehem. 

Wilham Adams Megraw, W T, Mechanical Engineering, 

Baltimore, Md. w r House, Bethlehem. 

Esteban A. Mercenario, Civil Engineering, 

Peubla, Mexico. 123 West Fourth St., South Bethlehem. 

Vice-President of the Sociedad Hispano- Americano de la Univer- 
sidad de Lehigh; C. E. Society. 

Thaddeus Merriman, Civil Engineering, 

University Park, South Bethlehem. 

TBIT: Engineering Society, President, '96, '97; Mathematical 
Club; L. U. Supply Bureau, '94, '97, President, '96, '97; 'Varsity 
Lacrosse Team, '96, '97, Captain, '97; Chess Club; Toast, Junior 
Banquet ; Treasurer of Class, Junior Year, Vice-President, Senior 
Year; Honor Roll. 

Frank Douglass Mount, Civil Engineering, 

Manasquan, N. J. 338 Vine St., South Bethlehem. 

TB IJ; Forum; Engineering Society; L. U. Christian Associa- 
tion; Chapel Choir. 

Carl Pivany Nachod, x W, Electrical Engineering, 

Glenside, Pa. x W House, South Bethlehem. 

Freshman Prize, German; E. E. Society; Chapel Choir; Tennis 
Association; Forum; T B 11 ; Honor Roll. 

Henry H. Xewton, Mechanical Engineering, 

628 Cherokee St., South Bethlehem. 
49 Carmen St., Guadalajara. Mexico. 

Member of the ' ' Sociedad Hispano- Americano de la Universidad 
de Lehigh ", President; Member of the M. E. Society. 

Robert Collyer Noerr, Civil Engineering, 

Brookland, D. C. 458 Chestnut St., South Bethlehem. 

TBU; Wilbur Prize, Rhetoric; Tennis Association; Forum; 
Supply Bureau; Christmas Hall Committee; Chairman, C. E. 
Society; Vice-President Mathematical Club; L. U. C. A ; Honor 
Roll. 

36 



Harry Richards Peck, Mechanical Engineering, 

516 Cherokee St., South Bethlehem. 
1523 Price St., Scranton, Pa. 

'94 Baseball Nine; '96 Baseball Nine; M. E. Society. 

James Harkins Pennington, Mechanical Engineering, 

314 S. New St.' Bethlehem. 
219 DeKalb Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Captain Freshmen Tug-of-War Team ; Recording Secretary, Y. 
M. C. A., '93,'94; Honor Court, '95, '96; Lacrosse Team ; President" 
Honor Court, '96, '97. ' 

Morris Havens Putnam, Mechanical Engineering, 

Tioga, Pa. 55 Main' St., Bethlehem. 

John Peake Reynolds, Jr., # j 0, Mechanical Engineering, 

Charleston, S. C. 402 Cherokee St., South Bethlehem. 

Honor Roll. 

Robert Porterfield Richardson, Analytical Chemistry, 

Easton, Pa. South Bethlehem. 

Samuel Stewart Riegel, Mechanical Engineering, 

523 Cherokee St., South Bethlehem. 

Eugene Peronnean Roundey, 2 X, Civil Engineering, 

179 Prospect St., East Orange, N. J.. 2 X House. 

Lacrosse Team, '96; C. E. Society; Junior Hop Committee. 

Woodford Royce, # // ©, Mechanical Engineering, 

502 Cherokee St., South Bethlehem. 
140 Church St., Willimantic, Conn. 

T B n, Vice-President Engineering Society; Honor Roll. 

Auguste Leopold Saltzman, $ // 0, Mechanical Engineering, 

# z/ House, South Bethlehem, 
62 Westervelt Ave., Plainfield, N. J. 

ONE; " Yood Gimel " ; 'Varsity Football Team, '94; Assistant 
Manager '95 Team; Manager '96 Team; '97 Epitome Board; 
Lehigh Burr, '96, '97 ; Athletic representative to advisory com- 
mittee, Junior Year; Junior German Committee. 

Charles Fred. Sanders, Civil Engineering, 

Kutztown, Pa. 129 West 4th St., South Bethlehem. 

37 



Charles Francis Scott, x #, Electrical Engineering-, 

X # House, South Bethlehem. 
Rochelle Park, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Eighteen Club; Sword and Crescent; Treasurer, Sophomore 
Cotillion Club; Founder's Day Hop Committee, '95, '96, Chairman 
of '96, "97; June Hop Committee, '95, '96; Assistant Business 
Manager, Burr, '95, '96, Manager, '96, '97; Mustard and Cheese, 
'95, '96, '97, Vice President, '95, '96; E. E. Society. 

Henr}^ Hamilton Seabrook, 2 $, Electrical Engineering, 

Beaufort, S. C. ^ # House, South Bethlehem. 

Sophomore Class Banquet Committee ; Class Cane Committee ; 
Sophomore Cotillion Club; E.E. Society; YoodGimel; Junior 
German Committee, Chairman; Founder's Day Hop Committee, 
'q6; Sword and Crescent; Mustard and Cheese, '95, '96, President', 
'96, '97. 

Samuel Palmer Senior, e J X, Civil Engineering, 

203 Elm St., Washington, D. C. & /I X House, Bethlehem. 

Yood Gimel; TBII: Agora; Athletic Representative of Class, 
Freshman Year; Captain of Class Football and Baseball Teams; 
'Varsity Baseball Team, '94, '95, '96, Captain, '96 ; Toast Freshman 
Banquet; 'Varisity Football Team, '95, '96; First Prize Running 
High Jump, '94, '96 ; First Prize Heavy Weight Boxing, '96 ; Junior 
German Committee ; Junior Hop Committee ; Toast Junior Ban- 
quet; President of Class, Senior Year. 

Arthur Harold Serrell, $ // 0, Electrical Engineering, 

402 Cherokee vSt., South Bethlehem. 
122 Plainfield Ave. , Plainfield, N. J. 

6> N E; Vice-President of Class, Sophomore Year; Toastmaster, 
Sophomore Banquet; Calculus Cremation Committee; June Hop 
Committee. 

Frank Bradley Sheaffer, Civil Engineering, 

New Bethlehem. 458 Chestnut St., South Bethlehem. 

John Leefe Sheppard, Jr., a TfL, Mechanical Engineering, 

315 Cherokee St., South Bethlehem. 
57 Smith St., Charleston, S. C. 

Agora; Engineering Society ; Lawn Tennis Association, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, '95, '96; Browji ajid lV/i//e Board, '95, '97; 
Exchange Editor, '96, '97 ; Choir. 

Edward Peter Shuman, Civil Engineering, 

129 South Fifth St., Allentown, Pa. 
Engineering Society ; Agora. 

38 



Jonathan Edward Slade, $ r //, Civil Engineering, 

'PP^ House, Bethlehem. 
292 Ohio St., Chicago, 111. 

Class Football Teams; Sophomore Cotillion Club; Engineering 
Society; Gun Club; Toast, Junior Class Supper. 

Michael Thomas Stack, Civil Engineering, 

520 Pawnee St., South Bethlehem. 
314 East Centre St., Shenandoah, Pa. 

Freshman and Sophomore Baseball Teams ; Engineering Society. 

Alvin Riegel Sterner, Electrical Engineering, 

Bethlehem. 
Paul Beno Straub, $ z/ 0, Electrical Engineering, 

Pittsburg, Pa. ^ ^ House, South Bethlehem. 

Honor Roll. 

Thomas Cedwyn Thomas, Mining Engineering, 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 338 Pine St.,' South Bethlehem. 

Honor Roll 

Columbus William Thorn, # r ^, Civil Engineering, 

# r z/ House, Bethlehem. 
1 100 J St., Washington, D. C. 

Sophomore Baseball Team; C. E. Society; Brown and White 
Board, '94/95; Assistant Manager, '95, '96; Manager, '96, '97; 
Toast Junior Class Supper; '97 Epitome Board, Business Manatrer; 
Yood Gimel; Gun Club. 

Wallace Treichler, Civil Engineering, 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 338 Vine St., South Bethlehem. 

TB n ; Brown and White Board; Honor Court; Calculus Cre- 
mation Committee; Class Secretary. Junior Year; Christmas Hall 
Committee, Chairman; Supply Bureau ; Agora, Secretary; Secre- 
tary, Engineering Society ; Secretary and Treasurer, C. E Sec- 
tion; Class Historian, Senior Year; Class Football Team '94; 
'Varsity Football Team, '95, '96; Honor Roll. 

William Edward Underwood, Mechanical Engineering, 

454 Vine St., South Bethlehem. 
141 1 Ritner St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

TBTI; Business Manager, jS'r^zf/w and White; Engineering 
Society; Secretary, Mathematical Club; Y. M. C. A. ; Honor Roll. 

39 



Harrison Ricord Van Duyne, K A, Electrical Engineering, 

I Broad St., Newark, X. J. j K A House, vSouth Bethlehem. 

Sword and Crescent ; Vice-President, Sophomore Cotillion Club ; 
Honor Court; Junior German Committee; June Hop Committee; 
Sophomore Tug-of-War Team; First, Horizontal Bar, Winter 
Meet; Substitute 'Varsity Football Team, '05; 'Varsity Football 
Team, '96, '97; Electrical Engineering Society. 

Charles Parker "Wagoner, ^ j 6), Civil Engineering, 

Phoenixville, Pa. 402 Cherokee St., South Bethlehem. 

ONE; Engineering Society. 

Gilbert Case White. $ k 2, Civil Engineering, 

705 Dakota St., South Bethlehem. 
I East Clay St., Richmond, Va. 

Vice-President, Freshmen Class; President, Sophomore Class; 
Toast and Committee, Freshman Class Supper; Wilbur Prize, 
Freshman Mathematics; Secretary', Supply Bureau, '94; Engineer- 
ing Society; Mathematical Club; Yood Gimel; Junior German 
Committee; Honor Court, 96; Assistant Manager, Baseball Team, 
'96, Manager, '97; Assistant Treasurer, Athletic Association, '96; 
T B n ; President, Sound-Monev League; Y. M. C A.; Honor 
Roll. 

George Livingstone Yates, ^ r A. Electrical Engineering, 

21 S. Pitt St., Carlisle, Pa. # r z/ House, Bethlehem. 

Sophomore Football Team; Captain, Sophomore Tug-of-War 
Team ; Sophomore Athletic Representative ; Sophomore Cotillion 
Club; Honor Court; Christmas Hall Committee; Toast, Sopho- 
more and Junior Banquets; Football Team, '94; Track Team, '94, 
'95, '96, '97; Calculus Cremation Committee; E. E. Society; 
Records in Indoor and Outdoor Running Broad Jump and High 
Kick; Yood Gimel; Director, Supply Bureau; Athletic Repre- 
sentative at Large and Chairman of Athletic Committee, Senior 
Year. 

Ambrose Everett Yohn, x W, Mechanical Engineering, 

Saxton, Pa. X W House, South Bethlehem. 

T B n ; Wilbur Prize, Freshman Mathematics; Engineering 
Society; Mathematical Club; Honor Roll. 

Frank Steinmetz Young, Mining Engineering, 

Plymouth Meeting, Pa. 446 Pawnee St., South Bethlehem. 



40 



Junior Class. 



/llbotto. 

Ne Tcntes Aiit Per fie e. 



'98 



Class Colors. 
Navy Blue and Old Gold. 



Class i?cll. 

Boom Rah ! 

Boom Ri ! 

'g8/ 

Lehigh ! 



©fticers. 



James Ralph FAR^yELL, 
D'Arcy Wentworth Roper, 
Paul Bucher, 
William Bell Wood, 
Martin Schaaff Stockett, 
Leonard Sherman Horner, 



President. 
Vice-President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 
Historian. 
A thletic Representative. 



41 




"^S the Junior year is considered to be the most pleasant year 
y| one spends in College, so the Junior history is more agreeable 
than that of any other class. To the vSenior, his history 
brings before him the time of parting so soon to take place, while 
the Sophomores and Freshmen are too engrossed in their petty 
rivalries to appreciate the deeper pleasures which a Junior 
experiences. 

During the whole of the Sophomore year the members of our 
class were struggling with those horrible monsters known as Cal- 
culus and Mechanics, but after months of hard and unremitting 
labor their eflEorts were crowned with success and the two fiends 
were bound, and tried before a tribunal of their former victims. 
The result was almost a foregone conclusion and it was decided 
that the two wretches were to be burned with fire and their ashes 
scattered to the winds of heaven. This decision was hailed with 
approbation from all sides, and it was decided that the execution 
should be converted into a celebration, in which all former slaves 
should play an active part, as the assistants and escorts of the 
executioner. The plan was followed out and on that night the 
two fiends were annihilated, nevermore to molest or disturb the 
peace of mind of the Class of '98. 



42 



The Cremation of Calculus was the last important event in 
our Sophomore year, and from that time we took upon ourselves 
the duties of Juniors and the dignities of upper-class men. Then, 
after the gayeties of Commencement Week, came the vacation, a 
well-earned rest from our studies, which was employed in various 
ways, although every man probably considered his own superior 
to all others. 

With a passing thought of the pleasant summer we had passed, 
we again turned our footsteps toward the green hills of the ancient 
borough of South Bethlehem, to combat again with our arch- 
enemies study and work. Upon our return many changes awaited 
us. We found with delight that at last there would be no more, 
" Mr. Fossil will you please take off those twenty absences," etc., 
and above all, we would no longer have to crawl out of our warm 
bunks, burn our throats with hot coffee in our hurry, and rush 
over to Chapel at a 2.02 gait. But we paused before we once 
more entered upon our studious career, for what a motley crew 
awaited us I They did, indeed, need a thorough training, and 
with infinite care we took within our protecting arms the new- 
born class of 1900. 

' ■ Ye gods, if we had known 
We would have flown 
From such a noisome pestilence." 

With great care we managed to protect this infant class from 
the blood-thirsty Sophomores, and, in a few lessons, taught them 
the art of getting down posters from telegraph poles, and banners 
from all sorts and kinds of inaccessible places, until finally we 
thought them sufficiently educated and left them to take care of 
themselves, with our blessing. 

Fotmder's Day came and with it the usual celebrations in 
honor of Judge Packer, and in the afternoon the contest between 
the Freshmen and Sophomores. The actual result of the sports 
was unsatisfactory, as it was a tie between the two classes, but it 
was of advantage as showing the material both for football and 
baseball in the Freshman class. The Founder's Day Hop is 

43 



always one of the pleasantest dances at Lehigh, and the Hop of 
the Autumn of '96 was particular enjoyable. Soon after this 
our former charges celebrated their doubtful victory by holding 
an undisturbed banquet in Allen town, another triumph which has 
caused them to render themselves subsequently particularly con- 
spicuous and obnoxious. 

Although the men on the football team from Ninety-Eight 
were few, yet we gave to that team a good, hard-working and con- 
scientious captain, who has already done great credit to his class. 
If his men stand by him, Mike will yet have a winning team. We 
have never been backward in College enthusiasm on the football 
field; and as long as Ninety-Eight is a class she will never grow 
tired of cheering for Lehigh's sons on the gridiron. 

Two days before Christmas we hied ourselves to our respective 
homes, there to spend a few days in recreation and seeing our 
sisters. Whether all of us did so or not is a question that cannot 
be positively answered, but all returned to work again with light 
hearts and lighter purses. We now started in on the home-stretch, 
for already examinations were looming up in the near future. 
Everybody studied and boned to his heart's content, and during 
the last week of January the question was, "Is it a flunk or a 
bald-headed six ? " After infinite grumbling and much perspiring 
we emerged from this rigorous ordeal with the conviction that if 
we did not make a bald-head we at least had the pleasure of another 
trial, and this with a few days vacation thrown in as a handicap, 
was sufficient to make us all feel that although, "The course of 
true study never did run smooth," yet we did the best we could. 

For the Junior Class, Washington's birthday is of more im- 
portance than to any other class, because the Junior Oratorical 
Contest is held on that day. The fact that Ninety-Seven failed in 
her duty in this respect did not affect the devotion of Ninety- 
Eight, who kept up the time-honored custom in a worthy way. 
The orations were of nearly equal merit and all were of a high 
order, and it was only after much deliberation that the prizes were 
finally awarded. It may be in consequence of this that both our 

44 



delegate to the Intercollegiate Oratorical Contest and his alternate 
are from the Junior class. 

We entered the Winter Meet, and by the help of cheering 
from our class our representatives succeeded in capturing a num- 
ber of events. Our cheering was not only for our own class but 
for all the other classes, showing that although Ninety- Eight would 
liked to have come out near the front of the list, yet she was just 
as well pleased in seeing the other classes forge ahead and bring 
out good men to advance Lehigh's name in the athletic world. 

In conclusion, it may be said that in spite of the apparent 
lack of class and College spirit, Ninety- Eight has always, in the 
time of necessity, done her duty, whether in the matter of Athletics 
or regular University work, and our hopes are, that, in the future, 
she is destined to perform greater works and accomplish more 
famous deeds than in the past. 

Chewed. 






45 




PACKER MEMORIAL CHURCH. 



3unior5. 



Harry L. Adams, X W, 

Thomas J. Anderson, 

Alanson Q. Bailey, 

Junius Ballard, 

Alejandro Barrientos, 

Henry D. Bishop, 
Henry T. Borhek, 
Daniel J. Broughal, 
Horatio F. Brown, A $, 

Paul Bucher, 

David F. Castilla, 

David H. Childs, 

H. M. Daggett, Jr., ^r d 

George Davies, ^ x, 
William X. Dehm, 

John J. Eckfeldt, 

L. Erie Edgar, -e X, 



Course. 
C.E., 



Residence. 



X W Lodge, Seneca St., S. B. 
Washington, D.C. 
C.E., Eagle Hotel, B. 

14 Prospect St., Cumberland, Md. 



Clas., 

M.E., 

C.E., 

M.E., 
E.M., 
A.C., 
M.E.. 

E.E., 

M.E.. 

E.M., 

E.E., 

M.E., 
C.E., 

M.E., 



502 Cherokee St., S. B. 

9 East 2ist St., Paterson, N. J. 

621 Cherokee St., S. B. 

Louisburg, N. C. 

306 Pawnee St., S. B. 

Santiago de Cuba 

Wall St., B. 

50S Goepp St., B. 

South Bethlehem, Pa. 

A # House, Delaware Ave., S. B. 

1 1 27 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

520 Pawnee St., S. B. 

100 1 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

626 Cherokee St., S. B. 

C. Cienegas, Coahuila, Mexico. 

509 Seminole St., S. B. 

Towanda, Pa. 

# r J House, B. 

615 Grove St., Elmira, N. Y. 

Catasauqua, Pa. 



39 W. Fourth St., S. B. 

243 Maple St., New Britain, Conn. 

79 Church St., B. 

Conshohocken. Pa. 

M.E., -EX House, Market St., B. 

267 So. Franklin vSt., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



47 



Course. Residence. 

Edgar D. Edmonston,$r//,E.E., $r^ House, B. 

1 220 Mass. Ave., Washington, D. C. 

C.E., Wl- House, Market St., B. 

Oswego, N. Y. 

C.E., 317 Packer Ave , S. B. 

1607 31st vSt. , Washington, D. C. 

M.E., Catasauqua, Pa. 



James R. Farwell. WT, 

Edgar A. Frisby, 

William B. Fuller, 
Jose M. G. Galan, 

Stewart J. Gass, & /} X, 

R. E. Lee George, j ^, 

William Gratz, 

William Gummere, ^ $. 



E.M., 628 Cherokee St., S. B. 

21 Victoria St., Satillo, Coahuila, Mex. 
E.E., z/ X House, Broad St., B. 

3425 Brightwood Ave., Washington, D.C. 
E.E., /} $ House, Delaware Ave. S. B. 
Ellicott City, Md. 
E.E., 428 Chestnut St., S. B. 

Carmel, N. J. 
A.C., South Bethlehem, Pa. 



Frank H. Gunsolus, B 6) 77, C. E. , B Q TI House, Cherokee St. , S. B. 

Tipton, la. 

Wentworth G. Hare, j $, M.E., j $ House, Delaware Ave, S. B. 

Ill S. 22d St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Raymond Hazel, E.E., 

George D. Heisey, W T, E.M., 
Henn^ B. Hershey, j r J, E.E., 
Herbert H. Hess, E.E., 



450 Chestnut St., S. B. 
Cressona, Pa. 

W r House, Market St., B. 

Dalewood, Pittsburg, Pa. 

/j T d House, Market St., B. 

Columbia, Pa. 

Hellertown, Pa. 



Edward D. Hillman, 2 $, M. E., .2 # House. Delaware Ave., S. B. 

58 So. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Harold J. Horn, E.E., 306 E. Third St., S. B. 



Leonard S. Horner. 2 X, E.E., 
Duncan Kennedy, Jr., E.E., 



2 X House, Market St., B. 

Marshall, Va. 

55 Main St., B. 

Washington, D. C. 



48 



Frank N, Kneas, 

Arthur O, Knight, 2 X. 

Basil G. Kodjbanoff, 

Jacob B. Krause, 
Thomas H. Lawrence, 

John B. Lindsey, Jr. , j KE 
Clarence A. Loomis, 2 X, 
Owen F. Luckenbach, 
G. K. McGunneg-le, a t/1, 

Lee H. Marshall, ^ 2", 
Sidney B. Merrill, :s N, 
Charles F. Moritz, 

Charles G Newton, 

49 
Jose A. de Obaldia, $ r J, 

John O'Reilly, 
Howard C. Paddock, 

Fred'k A. Perley, $ r J, 



Clarence M. Pflueger, 



Carroll W. Quarrier, ATD., 



Course. 
C.E., 

M.E., 

M.E., 

Clas., 
E E., 

,C.E., 

C.E., 



Residence. 

Chestnut St., S. B. 

364 Moore St., Norristown, Pa. 

2 X House, Market St,, B. 

Westfall, N. J. 

452 Chestnut St., S. B. 

Monastir, Macedonia. 

South Bethlehem. Pa. 



440 Vine St., S. B. 
Danville, Pa. 
430 Cherokee St., S. B. 
Frankfort, Ky. 
21 So. Linden St., B. 
12 Rodmen Ave., Plainfield, N. J. 
M.E., 27 Wall St., B. 

A.C., /} T /i House, Market St., B. 

Meadville, Pa. 

M.E., A r House. Cherokee St., S. B. 

814 Lilac St., Pittsburg, E. E., Pa. 

A.C., 2N House, Cherokee St., S. B. 

313 Ludlow St., Cincinnati, O. 

E.E., 501 W. Fourth St., S. B. 



C.E., 628 Cherokee St., S. B. 

Carmen St , Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mex. 
$ r ^ House, B. 
Panama, Republic of Columbia. 
South Bethlehem. Pa. 



C.E., 

A.C., 
C.E., 



460 Vine St., S. B. 

East Berlin, Conn. 

C. E. , ^ r A House, B. 

309 Campbell St., Williamsport, Pa. 

A.C., Seidersville, Pa. 

M.E., 432 Cherokee St., S. B. 

508 Kanawha St. , Charleston, W. Va. 



49 



Course. Residence. 

Victor C. Records, C.E., 444 Walnut St., S. B. 

10 Central Ave., Laurel, Del. 

Percy L. Reed, :s X, C.E., 516 Pawnee St., S. B. 

New Bedford, Mass. 

Benjamin D. Riegel, wr, M.E., W r House, Market St., B. 

Riegelsville, N. J. 

D'Arcy W. Roper, B S n, M.E., B© 77 House, Cherokee St., S. B. 

Petersburg, Va. 

Rafael F. Sanchez, E.M., Eagle Hotel, B. 

Gibara, Cuba. 

Henry C. Schwecke, E.E., 455 Vine St., S. B. 

9 Inspection St., Charleston, S. C. 

Henry H. Scovil, J T, M.E , AT House, Cherokee St., S. B. 

Copenhagen, N. Y. 

Daniel F. B. Shepp, $ /? 6), C. E. , ^ AS House, Cherokee St. , S. B. 

Tamaqua, Pa. 

Lewis C. Starkey, M.E., 455 Vine St., S. B. 

Bustleton, Pa. 

James W. Stauffer, C.E., 517 Pawnee St., S. B. 

Martin S. Stockett, $A&, Clas., $//© House, Cherokee St., S. B. 

Pottsville, Pa. 

E. H. Symington, // #, M.E., j $ House, Delaware Ave., S. B. 

615 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
William Ulrich, Jr., AC, 26 New St., B. 

Charles B. Warren, K A, M.E., KA Lodge, Cherokee St., S. B. 

83 Broad St., Westfield, Mass. 

Edward H. Waring, K A, M.E., K A Lodge, Cherokee St., S. B. 

Plainfield, N. J. 

Levi Watts, Jr., E.E., Fourth Ward Hotel, B. 

Terre Hill, Pa. 

Chas. E. Webster, Jr., KA, Clas., 500 Seneca St., S. B. 

Fred. C. Wettlaufer, © JX, A.C., QAX House, Broad St., B. 

489 Broome St., New York. 

Theo. B. Wood, Jr., ¥^ r, M.E., w 2" House, Market St., B. 

Chambersburg, Pa. 

50 



Course. Residence. 

William B. Wood, a i, M E.. ^ $ House, Delaware Ave., S. B. 

1 22 1 X. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 
Lawrence Wooden, C.E , 516 Pawnee St., S. B. 

Hampstead, Md. 
W^arren Worthington, a 2', M.E , a 2^ House, Cherokee St., S. B. 

Rushland, Pa. 
S. A. Yorks, Jr., a ta, E.E.. a ta House, Market St., B. 

Danville, Pa. 
Harry S. Zimmerman, C.E., 29 West 4th St.. S. B. 

State Line, Pa. 



IFn flDemonam. 

Carlos Ibcrnais Becerra, 

Glass ot '98, 

Wic^ at Caracas, Uene.5uela, September 8, 1895. 

j^ 

TRo^ X^man lEvans, 

Class of '98, 

2)ie& at Mest JSetblebem, pa., December 29, 1895. 

artbiir ipcrcv^ 2)c SauIIes, 

Class of 'OS, 
H)ie& at Orange, 1H. 5., Hpril 4, 1896. 

ffvm\{ jfoster H)a\>e£i, 

Class ot '98, 
Bie^ at Baltimore, /^^^., /iDarcb 22, 1897. 



Sopbomore Class- 



Mens A£;;itat Molem. 



'99 



Class Colors. 
Red and Blue. 



J' 

Class Ucll. 

Hi Rah ! 
Hi Ru ! 

L. U.! 

J- 



0tRcer3. 



John Wesley Grace, Jr., 
James Flanders Middledith, 
Frank Elliott Bradenbaugh, 
Bernard Todd Converse, 

J. Burr Reddig, 
Rov Rhodes Hornor, 



Preside7it. 
J Ice-President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 
Historiafi. 
A thletic Representative. 




OUR class has a distinction which we hope will fall to few 
classes at Lehigh in the present years of her existence. It 
entered small in numbers, and as such it still exists Great 
was our horror, as we assembled opposite the chapel on that Sep- 
tember day in '95, to find our numbers so small in comparison 
with the representation from the then Sophomore Class. 

Minus caps, neckties and other articles of wearing apparel we 
were able, finally, to get to the Freshman corner in the chapel 
and play our part in the opening exercises which followed, the 
first to be conducted by Dr. Drown at Lehigh. To us falls the 
proud distinction of being the first class to enter under the new 
administration, and the first address to us as a class was made by 
the new president. 

After the opening exercises we were able, by keeping to the 
paths, to get to the gymnasium, and there, by the aid of our 
friends, the Class of '97, we held our first class meeting. Colonel 
White, of the Junior Class, told us a few things about college 
customs, Joe Thurston spoke for the Athletic Committee, and 
Captain Trafton got up and looked around for football men. 
Temporary oflficers were chosen — Deacon Wentling was to be the 



54 



chief executive with Knight, Reddig and Fairchild as his cabinet. 
The class thus started on its life of four years at Lehigh. 

Many things have happened to us during our short existence, 
and encounters between the two lower classes have been numerous. 

In a week we had our picture taken and not a Sophomore was 
in sight. A month later we again met the same class, this time 
on the Athletic field. Another victory for Ninety-Nine was the 
result of the day's work; though few classes, in their first year, 
have succeeded in winning the Founder's Day Cane Spree. 

Our teams pulled together, winning the baseball and foot- 
ball events, and with them the first honors of the day. Before 
Thanksgiving we had our first class supper without interference 
from Ninety- Eight. 

Trig, and Algebra occupied our time, even to September, 
then as Sophomores we decorated the town with posters and proc- 
lamations, and saw that the Freshmen conducted themselves in a 
proper manner. When they grew bold and started to parade with 
a big banner, labeled with their class numerals, we suppressed 
the same with great alacrity, and enforced our commands with a 
relentless hand. 

The result of our second Cane Spree still remains in doubt ; 
we won the football game, lost the tug, and the third event, the 
baseball game was a tie. It is the only unsatisfactory contest in 
which our class has competed. 

In all the college organizations we are represented; on the 
musical clubs, Mustard and Cheese, literary and technical societies, 
and also on the different teams of the Athletic Associations. 

To this historian falls the task of recording the death of one 
of our classmates, one who was with us in the classroom but a 
short year ago. Richard Allen Harris occupied a prominent place 
in our midst while living, and by his death we have suffered the 
loss of a classmate whose scholarly ability, sincere friendship 
and sterling character endeared him to all. 

Historian. 



55 



Sopbomoree. 



Course. Residence. 

C.E., 713 Chestnut St., S. B. 

Florida, N. Y. 
460 Vine St., S. B. 
Delano, Pa. 
468 Chestnut St., 8. B. 
Caracas, Venezuela. 
460 Vine St., S. B. 
805 Howard St., Altoona, Pa. 
455 Vine St., S. B. 
1231 31st St., Washington, D. C. 
F. E. Bradenbaugh, WsT, M.E., !P"r House, B. 

mo Ann St., Parkesburg, W. Va. 
Sci., Hokendauqua, Pa. 



G. Fred Allen, 

Leon Whetstone Bailey, E.E., 

Richard Charles Becerra, A. C, 

Maurice Clark Benedict, M.E., 

Arthur Knode Birch. E.E.. 



John M. Buckland, 

Jose F. Capriles, C.E., 

Charles F. Carman, a T, C. E. , 

B. T. Converse, Ben, M.E. 

John P. Croll, C.E., 

Rudolph Degener, j $, M.E., 

Joseph K. -Ellenbogen, L.S., 

James C. England, E.E., 

Robert Farnham, Jr., 2X, C. E., 



123 W. Fourth St., S. B. 

Puerto Cabello, Venezeula. 

612 Dakota St., S. B. 

Cedarville, N. J. 

Ben House, S. B. 

1035 Fourth Ave., Louisville, Ky. 

454 Vine St., S. B. 

Trexlertown, Pa. 

, Bridge St., Catasauqua, Pa. 

5 W. 38th St., N. Y. City. 

139 S. 8th St., Allentown, Pa. 



460 Vine St., S. B. 
Washington, N. J. 
:e X House, B. 
1 1 03 M St., N. W., Wash., D. C. 
Jose G. Gandia, C.E., 626 Cherokee St., S. B. 

Puerta de Tierra, Porto Rico. 



Course, Residence. 

J. Walter Gannon, Q A X, C.E., 237 Broad St., B. 

Staten Island, N. Y. 

James H. Gledhill, M.E., 612 Dakota vSt, S. B. 

Riegelsville, Pa. 

Eugene G. Grace, j X, E.E., 612 Dakota vSt., S. B. 

Goshen, N. J. 

John W. Grace, 6> J X, E.E., 612 Dakota St., S. B. 

Goshen, N. J. 

Oscar C. Hannum, X !?', C.E., XW House, S. B. 

1807 Park Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Paul G. L. Hilken, j #, M. E. , A ^ House, S. B. 

133 W. Lanvale vSt. , Baltimore, Md. 
James C. Holderness, 2 *, E.E., -^ ^ House, S. B. 

7 Appleton St., Cambridge, Mass. 

George A. Home, :s X A.C., :2 X House, B. 

64 Willow Ave., N. Plainfield, N. J. 

Roy R. Hornor, SAX E.M., © j X House, B. 

Clarkesburg, W. Va. 

George R. Jackson, :s' $, C.E., 2 $ House, S. B. 

15 Rockwell Place, vScranton, Pa. 

V Harry R. James, ATfl, M.E., Cherokee St., B. 

655 Packer Ave, Braddock, Pa. 

Edward A. Keys, (9 J X, C.E., SAX House, B. 

Linden, Aid. 

Russell Kimball, Z'^, M.E., iiT ^ House, S. B. 

5th Ave. and 21st St., N. Y. City. 
Arthur W. Klein, M.E., 357 Market St., B. 

Clark M. Knight, WT, M.E., 38 Center St., B. 

Harry E. Knight, w T, Sci., y^ 2^ House, B. 

243 West 99th St., N. Y. City. 

Richards. Landron, C.E., 626 Cherokee St., S. B. 

15 San Francisco St., San Jaun, Porto Rico. 

G. Craig Leidy, w T', C.E., y/- 2'^ House, B. 

13 1 7 nth St., N. W., Washington, D.C. 

Newton W. Leidy, E.E., 103 2nd Ave., B. 

■ ^ , 1907 Franklin St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

58 



Course. Residence. 

Garth B. Luten, C.E., 454 Vine vSt., S. B. 

Cayce, Ky. 
Charles M. Masson, M.E., 703 Dakota St., vS. B. 

5 Vine St., Hammondsport, N. Y. 
William L. Meaker, A.C., 514 Cherokee St., S. B. 

James F. Middledith, K A, M.E., if ^ House, S. B. 

829 Park Ave., Plainfield, N. J. 
Robert H.Moffitt,Jr.,z; r//,E.M., j t A House, B. 

1705 N. Front St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
J. Foster Morgan, E.E., 129 W. Fourth St., S. B. 

Harwood Mines, Pa. 
Charles S. Padget, Arch., 305 Linden St., B. 

Henry R. Palmer, $rz/, M.E., ^rA House, B. 

32 S. High St., West Chester, Pa. 
John R. Pettit, z/ $, E.M., a $ House, S. B. 

2205 Trinity Place, Philadelphia, Pa. 
William Piez, M.E., 129 W. Fourth St., S. B. 

14S E. 46th St., N. Y. City. 
Louis T. Rainey, $rz/, E.E., i F A House, B. 

548 W. Wood St., Decatur, 111. 
J. Burr Reddig, w r, M.E., 422 Cherokee St., S. B. 

Shippensburg, Pa. 
Percy L. Reed, x ^, C.E., x ^ House, S. B. 

Sunbury, Pa. 
Victor H. Reid, C.E., 452 Vine St., S. B. 

282 Quincy St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Howard A. Riegel, C.E., 71 So. Main St., B. 

George L. Robinson, y^ r, C.E., w r House, B. 

302 William St., Elmira, N. Y. 
Gustavo Rovelo, M.E., 123 W. Fourth St., S. B. 

Comitan- Chiapas, Mex. 
Oliverio Sanchez, C.E., 211 S. New St., B. 

Campanano 131, Habana, Cuba. 
Abraham Shinier, M.E., West Bethlehem, Pa. 

59 



Course. Residence. 

Robert S, Shriver, Arch., Wyandotte Hotel, S. B. 

77 Washington St., Cumberland, Md. 
William H. Speirs, E.E , New St., B. 

4410 Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
Abram P. Steckel, E.E., 5 S. Main St., B. 

64 Main St., Lykens, Pa. 
Robert M. Straub, <? J 0, C.E., i A @ House, S. B. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 
William W. Thurston, 2 0, E. M. , 311 Cherokee St. , S. B. 

Lawrens Van Benthem, E.E., Wyandotte Hotel, vS. B. 

39 The Princess Main St., The Hague, Holland. 

John S. Viehe, E.E., 147 S. New St., B. 

605 Perry St., Vincennes, Ind. 

Theodore C.Visscher, y^r, C.E., S' r House, B. 

Ill W. Court St., Rome, N. Y. 
Joseph D.Wentling, a T A, E.E., ATA House, B. 

1 142 Main vSt., Greensburg, Pa. 
Harry A. Wilcox, C.E., 514 Cherokee St., vS. B. 

West Granby, Conn. 
George B. Williams, 2 X, Arch , 2 X House, B. 

Washington, D. C. 

George H. Wood, wr, M.E., yr House, B. 

Chambersburg, Pa. 

Wright Youtsey, // rz/, E.M., ATA House, B. 

1 01 6 Central St., Newport, Ky. 



c3^ 



60 




/Irrtrrr.PMItt ■ 



jFresbman Class. 



/Iftotto. 

Faiiiac it Hoiiori 
Otiaerij/ins. 



1900 



Clags Colors. 

Purple 
and White. 



Class IJell. 

Rix Ker oo ! 

Rix Ker ee I 

L. U.f 

Century ! 



©fficers. 

Master Hugh Banks Chapman, 
Master John Louis Meixell, 
Master Clayton Miller Simmers, 
Master William Brush Grubb, 
Master Harry Iyixs Magee, 
Master William Towxsend White 



President. 

J ^ice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 

Historian. 

Athletic Representative. 



6i 



,''*V.. 




"n SPECTATOR viewing the crowd assembled on the campus 
,/| of Lehigh University, on the afternoon of vSeptember 23, 
1896, would have been led to suppose that an event of some 
importance was about to happen; and he would not have been far 
wrong in his conjecture. For this assemblage marked the forma- 
tion of our class, the class of Nineteen Hundred. 

After the usual chapel exercises, we were conducted by the 
Juniors to the gymnasium, where we held our first meeting and 
elected our officers. On our way to the gymnasium we were 
materially assisted by suggestions from the Sophomores, who, 
though lacking in members and wisdom, did their best to amuse 
us by their playful actions. 

After the meeting we sallied down in a body to meet the 
Sophomores, who were confidently awaiting us at the gate to give 
us a cordial reception. The rush which followed would have been 

62 



rather interesting, had the Sophomores only shown a little more 
pluck and endurance. As it was, when the dust had cleared away, 
the members of the illustrious class of Ninety-Xine found them- 
selves at the bottom of the hill instead of at the top, where they 
had originally intended to remain. 

The taking of the class picture was also a success. On the 
day appointed sixty men appeared, and the picture was taken 
without the interference of a single Sophomore. 

During the next few weeks the Sophomores seemed to have 
settled into a state of lethargy; for, with the exception of a few 
wild rushes, nothing was done until the time for putting up posters 
came around. Then, according to the usual custom, they decor- 
ated the town with posters containing their ideas as to how we 
should behave in the future. Xinety-Xine did not seem to relish 
the work of putting up these posters, however. They appeared 
anxious and nervous, as if they w^anted to get the work off their 
hands as soon possible. As a result, but few were pasted up at 
all, and they were quickly disposed of by Xineteen Hundred. 

Founder's Day came at last, and with it another surprise for 
our "-Most Noble Peers'' ; for instead of having the walkover they 
anticipated, they were only saved from defeat by the best of luck. 
Ninety-Xine came out ahead on the football game; the tug-of-war 
was easily won by our men, and the baseball game, after five hard- 
played innings, was called with the score at o to o. 

Allentown has been the scene of many jollifications, but it 
now witnessed a jollier one than when the Freshmen came to town 
on the night of their banquet. About sixty men together with 
our three guests from X'inety-Eight sat down to the feast. It may 
be incidentally added that one Sophomore appeared who looked 
meekly around and left. Everybody had a fine time, of course, 
and all went home happy, — that is, all those who were able to get 
home. Truly, Xineteen Hundred has a brilliant future before 
her. May she never depart from the standard she has set. 

Historian. 



63 



3fre6bmen. 

Course. Residence. 

L. Benjamin Abbot, 2X, M.E., 2" X House, Market St., B. 

50 Garfield Ave., Carbondale, Pa. 

Raymond Claud Albright, E.E.. 628 Turner St., Allentown, Pa. 

George Krieble Anders, E E., Lansdale, Pa 

Arthur B. Anderson, .SX. E.E.. 521 Cherokee St., S. B. 

Philadelphia, Pa 

George William Baragcr. M.E., 452 Chestnut St., S. B. 

308 E. Beech St., Hazleton, Pa. 
Paul Weiss Barber, M.E., 212 Broad St., W. B. 

W. Edgar Bartholomew, C.E, Richlandtown, Pa. 

Albert William Bavard, M.E., 45^ Chestnut St., S. B. 

190S Third St., Washington, D. C. 
Berthold Graeff Beck, E.E., 220 Fourth Ave., W. B. 

Thomas Francis Bell, M.E.. 520 Pawnee St., S. B. 

305 W.Cherry St., Shenandoah. Pa. 

John Francis Benson, B ^77 C.E., B Q 77 House, Cherokee St., S. B. 

314 Muddle St., Portsmouth, Va. 

E. Percv Bigelow, ^ m, E.E., 522 Pawnee St., S. B. 

' Oxford, N. J. 

Marmion Stanley Black, A.C., 313 Cherokee St., S. B. 

Swedesboro, X.j. 

James Raymond Boak, E E., 109 W. Fourth St., S. B. 

Hughesville, Pa. 

Russell Julian Borhek, M.E., 230 First Ave., W B. 

Reg. Welles Bours, J r J, C.E., ATA House, 158 Market St.. B. 

409 E.Adam St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

John Hall Bower, E.M., 462 Chestnut St., S. B. 

Myerstown, Pa. 

65 



Henry Lawton Bowers, 
Andrew Thomas Brice, 
John James Brice, 
Joseph William Burke, 



Course. Residence. 

A.C. 126 S. Centre St., B. 

Rome, N. Y. 
E.E., Fourth Ward Hotel, B. 

New York, N. Y. 
C.E., Fourth Ward Hotel, B. 

New York, N. Y. 
C.E., 520 Pawnee St., S. B. 

336 W.Centre St., Shenandoah, Pa. 
M. Greene Candee, 2 A", E.E., 719 Cherokee St., S. B. 

24 Fifth St., Washington, D. C. 
D. Hastings Canfield, 2 ^, Arch., '2 $ Place, Delaware Ave., S. B. 

21 Prospect St. ,Middletown,N.Y. 
Morrow Chamberlain, WY, E.M , 422 Cherokee St., S. B. 

237 E. Terrace St.,Chattanooga,Tenn. 
H. Banks Chapman,^© 77, E.E. ,B0zz House, 427 Cherokee St., S.B. 

St. Elmo, Tenn. 



George Ralph Coffin, 2 A', A.C, 

R. Cromwell Congdon,X$, M.E., 

Robert Milton Cortright, EE, 
George Curtis Coutant, E.M., 

George Hooper Day, ^ r/2, E.E., 
John Kenelm Digby, X ^, E M., 
Herbert C. Dilliard, C.E., 

Raymond Aloysius Dinan, A.C,, 
Alan Craig Dodson, a $, L. S., 
T. Monroe Dodson, 2d, z/^, Arch., 



719 Cherokee St., S. B. 

9 Walker Ave., Bradford, Pa. 

X ^ House, Brodhead Ave.,S.B. 

13 1 2 Park Ave. , Baltimore, Md. 

20 S.Centre St., B. 

16 W. Fourth St., vS. B. 

High Falls, N. Y. 

522 Pawnee St., S. B. 

20 Summit St., Batavia, N. Y. 

X $ House, Brodhead Ave,,S.B. 

London, England. 

508 E. Fourth St., S. B. 

East Bangor, Pa. 

230 E. Third St., S. B. 

215 Market St., B. 

215 Market St., B. 



Gavin Hogg Dortch, X $, M.E., x$ House Brodhead Ave., S.B. 

Goldsboro, N. C. 



66 



William T. Drake, 

Nimson Eckert, 

Charles A. Emerson,. j tSI, 

John William Fletcher, 

Theodore Frederic Forbes, 

R. ]\IcX. Freeman, 

Donald C. Fugitt. (-J AX. 

John Fuller, 

Frank Giering, 
Arthur Hendrix Gill, 

George C. D. Goldsmith, 
Herbert T. Greene, $ r A. 

Frederick Augustus Groff , 

Charles Frederick Gross, 

William B. Grubbe, 

Arthur B. Hanscom, X W, 

Edmund F. Harmony, 
Ernest Warf el Haverstick, 

Austin Diehl Heller, 
Albert D. Hollingsworth, 



Course. Residence. 

M.E., 452 Vine St., S. B. 

Old Forge, Pa. 
Clas., 430 Walnut St., AUentown, Pa. 

E.E., 315 Cherokee St., S. B. 

Box 65, Summerville, S. C. 

M.E., 16 West 4th St., S. B. 

Skowhegan, Me. 

,A.C., 422 Cherokee St., S. B. 

Fort McPherson, Ga. 

E.E., 467 Vine St., S. B. 

Andover, X. J. 

M.E., 237 Broad St., B. 

1 41 6 K. St., Washington, D. C. 

M.E.. 16 West Fourth vSt., S. B. 

Ouarryville, Sussex Co., N. J. 

M.E., 62 Main St., B. 



Catasauqua, Pa. 



E.E., 534 Chestnut St. , S. B. 

Boring P. O., Baltimore Co., Md. 
C.E., 

E.^SI., ^r A House, B. 

25 W. 123d St., New York, N. Y. 

E.E., Post Office Building, B. 

Rome, X. Y. 

C.E., 312 Packer Ave., S. B. 

Belvidere, N. J. 

C.E., 107 W. Fourth St., S. B. 

P. O. B. 157, Pine Plains, X. Y. 

C. E., X IZ'" Lodge, 510 Seneca St., S. B. 

1 7 14 Jefferson St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

A.C., Cross Keys Hotel, AUentown, Pa. 



E.E., 

L.S., 
Arch. 



67 



109 W. Fourth St., S. B. 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Main St., Hellertown, Pa. 

468 Chestnut St., S. B. 
Scotch Plains, X'. J. 



Course. Residence. 

Michael James Honan, E.E., 413 E. 3rd St., S. B. 

Oxford, N. J. 
Edward M. Huggins. E.E., 467 Vine St., S. B. 

Nevis, British West Indies. 
Lloyd Jones Iredell, AT£l, Sci., 313 X. 4th vSt., Allentown, Pa. 

William Edward Johnston, E.M., 703 Dakota St., S B. 

Latrobe, Pa. 
Clarence P. Kennedy. .SA", Sci.. 719 Cherokee St., S. B. 

610 Potomac Ave., Buffalo, X. Y. 
Elliott B. Kitchen, AY, E.E., 440 Pawnee St., S. B. 

Academy St., S. Orange, X. J. 

Paul Kline, x W, C.E.. X S^ Lodge, 510 Seneca St., S. B. 

642 ^Maryland Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 
Frank Jones Laubenstein, Sci., Am. Hotel, Broad & New Sts., B. 

425 Centre St., Ashland, Pa. 
Mason Benedict Lawton. A.C., 126 S. Centre St., B. 

Rome, X. Y. 
John Edward Leibfried, A.C., 18 Main St., B. 

Leroy Streeter Leopold. M.E.. 55 Main St., B, 

67 X. Franklin St., Pottstow'n, Pa. 

William Grant Lessig, E.E.. 440 Pawnee St., S. B. 

12 N. Main St.. Shenandoah, Pa. 

Herbert Spencer Lewis, C.E.. 534 Chestnut St., S. B. 

231 N. Green St., Baltimore, Md. 

Thomas W. Lukens. ATA. E.M.. ATA House. 158 Market St., B. 

Atglen, Pa. 

Charles E. Terry Lull, E.M., 468 Chestnut St., S. B. 

73 Gloucester St., Annapolis, Aid. 
Wm. Thomas McCarthy, Arch.. Rome, N. Y. 

Kenneth W. McComas, A.C., 704 Dakota St., S. B. 

David G. McGavock, :s $ , E.E., 520 Pawnee St., S. B. 

Wytheville, ^^a. 
Johnson McVeigh, A.C., i KieiTer St., S. B. 

New York, N. Y. 

68 



William G, McVeigh, 

Carl Edw'd Maeder, k:2, M.E., 



Course. Residence. 

C.E., I Kiefifer St., S. B. 

Xew York, N. Y. 
317 Packer Ave., S. B. 
326 Neville St.. Pittsburg, Pa. 
Harry Ivins Magee, $r^, C.E., $ rj House, B. 

1025 W. Lehigh Ave., Philadelphia. Pa. 
William Ellston Magie, M.E., 540 Wyandotte St., S. B. 

New York, N. Y. 
C.E., 42 Church St., B. 

Plymouth, Pa. 

E.E., 320 Packer Ave., S. B. 

402 Central Ave. , Parsons, Kans. 

A.C., 113 X. New St., B. 



Joseph Patrick Martin, 
Louis Meixell, a Tfl, 
Harry M. Menner, 



Manuel de la Mora, 
Robert C. Morris, Jr. 



C.E., 314 Brodhead Ave., S. B. 

19 San Francisco St., Guadalajara, ]\lex. 
M.E., 23 N. Center St., B. 

403 E. Market St , Pottsville, Pa. 
George R. Morrow, AT, A. C, 431 Cherokee St., S. B. 

Highspire, Pa. 
Harry Tilghman Ochs, E.E., 227 N. Fifth St., Allentown, Pa. 



Louis Ortner, 



M.E., 



452 Chestnut St., S. B. 
Drifton, Pa. 
Arthur R. Parsons, X W, E.M., X!?" Lodge, 510 Seneca St., S. B. 

930 East St., Salt Lake City, Utah. 
431 Cherokee St., S. B. 
Copenhagen, N. Y. 



Frederick Jay Payne, z/ 2' M.E., 
John H. Pomeroy, j X, E.E., 
Norman S. Powell, E.M., 

Joseph Jacob Reamer, C. E., 
John Nicholas Reese, E.E.. 



612 Dakota St., S. B. 
Ridley Park, Pa. 
719 Cherokee St., S. B. 
West Middlesex, Pa. 
522 Pawnee St., S. B. 
Waterloo, N. Y. 
411 Fourth St.. S. B. 
1419 N. Third St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
Alexander D. Robb, a $, A.C., A $House, Delaware Ave., S. B. 

S. Main St., Phoenixville, Pa. 

69 



Course. Residefice. 

Walter H. Rodney, X ^, C.E., x ^ House, Brodhead Ave., vS. B. 

Fort McHenry, Baltimore, Md. 
F. W. Roebling, Jr. , :s ^, M. E. , :2 ^ House, Delaware Ave. , S. B. 

2 22 W. State St., Trenton, N. J. 
C.E.. 25 W. Fourth St., S. B. 

Water St., Kittanning, Pa. 
M.E., 450 Chestnut St., S. B. 

705 W. Huntingdon St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
E.M., 211 S. New St., B. 

131 Campanario St., Habana, Cuba. 
A.C., Eagle Hotel, B. 

Sta. Lucia Gibara, Cuba. 
Edmund T. Satchell, 2X, A.C., 2X House, Market St., B. 

2,^ E. Walnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 
Martin Schwerin, $r/i. E M., $r-iJ House, B. 

324 113th St., New York, N. Y. 
Carlos N. Scovil, A r, M.E., 431 Cherokee St., S. B. 

Copenhagen, N. Y. 
Harvey Simon Seiple, M.E. 114 Fairview St., B. 

Joseph Stauffer Schultz, C.E., 468 Chestnut St., S. B. 

Washington Boro., Lancaster Co., Pa. 



James George Ross, 
Charles Edward Rowe 
Armando vSanchez, 
Alfredo J. vSanchez, 



Clayton Miller Simmers, C.E., 

Charles vSylvanus Snyder, AC, 
Ariuro vSol<5rzano, M.E 

William Paul Starkey, M.E. 

Herbert Spencer Stauffer, M.E. 
John Alvin Strauss, XW, E. E. 

Henry A. Tobtlmann, Jr. , A.C., 

Arthur W. T. Turner, M. E., 



452 Chestnut St., S. B. 
Phixnixville, Pa. 

454 Vine St., S. B. 

, 468 Chestnut St, S. B. 

Managua, Nicaragua, Cen. Am. 

455 Vine St., S. B. 

Bustleton, Pa. 
, 517 Pawnee St., S. B. 

206 N. Centre St., B. 

Sayre, Pa. 

107 W. Fourth St., S. B. 

90 Monmouth St., Newark, N. J. 

Ill W. Fourth St., S. B. 

22 Spaulding vSt., Amherst, Mass. 



70 



Course. Residence. 

J. Ralph Van Duyne. K A, C.E., KA House, 505 Cherokee St., S. B. 

Newark. N. J. 
Bertil Von Philp, M.E.. 30 First Ave., B. 

R. Ambrose Warner, :2 IS. E.M., 719 Cherokee St.. S. B. 

210 A St., S. E., Washington, D. C. 
William Penn White, X S^, E. E. , XW Lodge, 510 Seneca St. . S. B. 

1017 loth St., N. W. , Washington, D. C. 
W. Townsend White, :2 $, Arch., :s $ House, Delaware Ave., S. B. 

503 W. Fourth St., Williamsport, Pa. 
Lloyd Taylor Wilcoxon, M.E., 820 Walnut St., Allentown, Pa. 

48 Van Buren St., Freeport, 111. 
Toros Kurk Yasharian, E.E., 229 Broad St., S. B. 

Hedjin, Asia Minor, Turkey. 
Edward Robins Zalinski, E.M., Cherokee St., S. B. 

Medina, N. Y. 



^ 



71 



IReflecteb Ibistor^— '96. 

Where shall I hide my forehead and my eyes, 
For now I see the true old times are dead. 

Tennyson. 

CORD MACAULAY has forewarned the readers of history by 
announcing that there has never yet been written a good 

history, and he claims that to be a really great historian 
is perhaps the rarest of intellectual distinctions. So may it be, 
but the honorable gentleman never saw our Epitome '• histories," 
and let it be said, if he had, he would never have recognized them 
as histories, — much less the following: 

It is one feat to write about college days while in the midst 
of those days, and still another to look up to them from depths of 
the actual and the realistic, the practical and the busy life. While 
the historian is still partaking of them, it is one picture to recall 
the college pleasures and sorrows, the little tragedies and the big 
triumphs, the hours of toil and the hours borrowed from toil, the 
athletic victories and the less important athletic defeats, the 
undergraduate fellow^ships and the Allentown companionships, the 
abundance ot shekels and of bald-headed sixes, the Freshman 
verdancy and the Sophomore audacity, the Junior frivolity and 
the Senior dignity; — but it is another scene to recall these same 
achievements and follies when we are far away from them, work- 
ing to keep clear of more debts and flunks than are ever thought 
of in college life. After we taste the real article we consider the 
college days, with their freedom, their inspirations, their ambi- 
tions, and their idealisms, somewhat as a matter of love, and here 
"Love is blind, and lovers cannot see the pretty follies that they 
themselves commit." Yet, after all, we must say with Tennyson, 

73 



" 'Tis better to have loved and lost, than never to have loved at 
all." For who of us but recall those days with pleasure ? "Where 
e'er I roam, whatever realms to see, my heart entravell'd fondly 
turns to thee." 

No Epitome history can satisfy the cravings of the alumnus 
for recollections, which are nearest and dearest to him, of his 
undergTaduate life. The best influence that one of these so-called 
" histories" can exert is possibly to set an example, possibly to in- 
spire the solitary Freshman who may be the sole reader of it (ex- 
cepting, of course, the editors of the volumes in question, for they 
always read everything in their own book), — or possibly the smoke 
of this paper used to light a pipe, will cloud some Ninety-Six man's 
vision from worldly cares, and present to him those happy college 
days, "gone, but not forgotten." 

The honored or the dishonored men of Ninety-Six should say, 
" It is done; be it good, bad, or indifferent, that is not for us to 
judge." We should now insist upon offering a proclamation to 
the effect that in the race for the survival of the fittest, the memory 
of our actions will outlast all others. Was our class spirit equal 
to any? Well and good, — if it was, we lay claim to the distinction ; 
but if it was not, we suffer the misfortune. We might insist that 
had it not been for the lacrosse enthusiasts of Ninety-Six, Lehigh 
would not have won the intercollegiate championship last spring, 
but it may be you would say we were prejudiced. We might 
claim that the true Lehigh support given by Ninety-Six to the 
baseball team caused the defeat of Lafayette in that memorable 
game at Allentown; but you might say — " Honor to whom honor 
is due," — how about the real players in that little contest, also 
that new pitcher, and tJie Ninety-vSix man who almost alone won 
the game? And the same when we defeated the Eligibles of the 
University of Pennsylvania. So the merry story might continue. 
We would either reason unwisely, or we would imagine too 
much — it would not exactly be a pseudo history, but an ex- 
aggerated history. Our memorials to Lehigh are to shine, 
unpolished, from their own true lustre, just as we, when Fresh- 

74 



men, young and green, stepped upon the college stage unheralded 
and unnoticed, there to prove our worth. 

Notes concerning the class of Ninety -Six will be found in pre- 
vious EpiTOiMES and in the Ninety-Six Class Book. There are 
recorded our printable actions concerning nearly everything — from 
the juvenile rushes, cane-sprees, acts of patriotism and the more 
important but less frequently reported accounts of flunks ; through 
the deeds of valor which become us as Sophomores; first, in little 
disagreements with Freshmen, and later with those tyrants, Olney, 
Courtenay and Wood ; through the achievements of the under class- 
men disclosing the already apparent signs of greatness, and later 
exhibited in such movements as the honor system and the Ninety- 
Six Epitome; to the climax, grand and glorious, witnessed in the 
Senior year, and showing the true greatness of the class which, 
not satisfied with the honor of having instituted several new cus- 
toms, added further innovations, such as the Class Book, the 
Memorial Steps erected with the aid of every man of the class, and 
the retirement from the midst of the Dutchmen without a sheriff's 
posse following in the scattered tracks. By vote of the individual 
members, the most important things Ninety-Six accomplished as a 
class were: The establishment of the Cremation of Calculus Cele- 
bration on a reformed basis; the introduction of the Class Book; 
the establishment of the Honor System; the sending of the Ninety- 
Three Lacrosse team to Baltimore; the organization of the Sopho- 
more Cotillion Club; the publishing of the Class Epitome; the at- 
tainment of success in the June Hop of '96 and the erection of the 
Memorial Steps. Unlike every other history with a birth, a rise to 
power and a decline, ours has but a birth and a victory, with no 
decline. We feel that we can well say to future Lehigh men : 

'' Lives of great men all remind us 
We can make our lives sublime, 
And departing leave behind us 
Footprints on the sands of time.'' 

D. W. W., Jr., '96. 



75 



Xist of Chapters. 



IN THE ORDER OF THEIR ESTABLISHMENT. 



Fraternity. 

Chi Phi, 

Alpha Tau Omega, 

Delta Phi, . 

Psi Upsilon, 

Theta Delta Chi, 

Delta Upsilon, 

Sigma Nu, 

Phi Gamma Delta, 

Sigma Phi, 

Phi Delta Theta, 

Sigma Chi, 

Delta Tau Delta, 

Beta Theta Pi, . 

Kappa Alpha, . 

Chi Psi, 



Chapter. 

. Psi, . . . 
Alpha Rho, . 

. Nu, . 

Eta, 

Nu Deuteron, . 

Lehigh, 
. Pi, . 

Beta Chi, 

Pennsylvania Alpha, 

Pennsylvania Eta, 

Alpha Rho, 

Beta Lambda, 

Beta Chi, 

Pennsylvania Alpha, 

Alpha Beta Delta. 



Date of 

Est a blish in ent 

at LehigJi. 

. 1872 

1882 

. 1884 

1884 

1884 

1885 

• 1885 
1886 
1887 
18S7 

. 1888 
1888 
1890 
1894 

. 1894 



77 



dbi pbi. 



jt 



Alpha, 

Beta, 

Gamma, 

Delta, 

Epsilon, 

Zeta, 

Eta, 

Theia, . 

Iota, 

La.mbda, 

Mu, 

Nu, . 

Xi, 

Omicron, . 

Pi, 

Rho, 

Sigma, 

Tau, 

Phi, 

Psi, 



IRoll of Cbaptere. 

University of Virginia. 

. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

. Emory College. 

Rutgers College. 

Hampden- Sidney College. 

Franklin and Marshall College. 

University of Georiga. 

. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 

Ohio State University. 

University of California. 

Stevens Institute. 

University of Texas. 

. Cornell University. 

Sheffield Scientific School. 

Vanderbilt University. 

Lafayette College. 

Wofford College. 

University of vSouth Carolina. 

Amherst College. 

Lehigh University. 



78 



¥4 



(Tbi pbi. 

^ . 

p5i Cbapter, 

J- 

1Re6lC>ent /Iftcmbers. 

Francis Weiss, George Rodney Booth, 

Charles Miner Dodson, Albert Brodhead, 

James Rawle. 

Scttvc /Iftembcrs. 

Charles Francis Scott, Henry Taylor Irwin, 

Percy Lesley Reed, Gayin Hogg Dortch, 

John Kenelm Digby, Walter Henry Rodney, 

Richard Cromwell Congdon. 



79 



Hlpba Zm\ ©mega. 



jt 



IRoIl of active dbapters, 

Virginia Beta, . . . Washington and Lee Univ. , 1865 

Virginia Delta, . . University of Virginia, . 1868 

Tennessee Lambda, . . Cumberland University, . 1868 

North Carolina Alpha Chi, Trinity College, . . 1872 

Tennessee Omega, . . University of the South, . 1877 

Georgia Alpha Beta, . L^niversity of Georgia, . 1878 

North Carolina Alpha Delta, University of North Carolina, 1879 



Alabama Alpha Epsilon, 

Georgia Alpha Zeta, 

Pennsylvania Tau, 

Georgia Alpha Theta, 

Pennsylvania Alpha Iota, 

Michigan Alpha Mu, 

Ohio Alpha Nu, . 

New York Alpha Omicron, 

Pennsylvania Alpha Rho. 

Tennessee Alpha Tau, 

Pennsylvania Alpha Upsilon, Pennsylvania College, 

South Carolina Alpha Phi, Wittenberg College, 



Alabama State College, 1879 

Mercer University, . 1880 

University of Pennsylvania, 1881 
Emory College, . 1881 

Muhlenberg College, . 1881 

Adrian College, . . 1881 

Mt. Union College, . .1882 
St. Lawrence University, 1882 

Lehigh University, . . 1882 

Southwest PresbyterianUniv,, 1882 

. 1882 
1883 



Alabama Beta Beta, . 
Alabama Beta Delta, 
LouiSANA Beta Epsilon, 
Vermont Beta Zeta, 
Ohio Beta Eta, 
New York Beta Theta, . 
Georgia Beta Iota, 
Michigan Beta Kappa, 
Ohio Beta Mu, 
Michigan Beta Omicron, 
Tennessee Beta Pi, 
Ohio Beta Rho, 
Tennessee Beta Tau, 
Main Beta Upsilon, 
California Beta Psi, . 
Ohio Beta Omega, 
Main Gamma Alpha, 
Massachusetts Gamma Beta, 
Indiana Gamma Gamma, 
Rhode Island Gamma Delta, 
Illinois Gamma Epsilon, 
Texas Gamma Zeta, 



Southern University, . 1885 

University of Alabama, . 1885 

Tulane University, . 1887 

University of Vermont, . 1887 

Ohio Wesleyan University, 1887 

Cornell University, . 1887 
Georgia School of Technology, 1888 

Hillsdale College, . . 1888 

University of Worcester, . 1888 

Albion College, . . 1889 

Vanderbilt University, . 1889 

Marietta College, . . 1890 
Southwest Baptist University, 1890 

Main State College, . 1891 

Leland-Stanford University, 1892 

Ohio State University, . 1892 

Colby University, . . 1892 

Tufts College, . . 1893 

Rose Polytechnic Institute, 1893 

Brown University, . 1894 

University of Illinois, . 1895 

Austin College, . . 1895 



Hlpba ^au ©inega. 



Pennsylvania Hlpba IRbo Chapter. 



IResiDent /nbembcr. 

Francis H. Erwin, M.D. 

Bctive /iRembei'S. 

Edwin Percy Bigelow, Harry Ruse James, 

George Hooper Day, John Le\vis Meixell, 

Charles Albion Emerson, Carroll Winston Quarrier, 

Lloyd Jones Iredell, John Leefe Sheppard, Jr. 



82 






-w^ 



©elta Ipbi. 



J- 



IRoU of Cbaptcre, 



Alpha, 

Beta, 

Gamma, 

Delta, 

Epsilon, 

Zeta, 

Eta, 

Lambda, 

Nu, 

Xi, . 

Omicron, 

Pi, . 



Union College. 

Brown University. 

. New York University. 

Columbia College. 

. Rutgers College. 

Harvard University. 

University of Pennsylvania. 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 

Lehigh University. 

Johns Hopkins University. 

vSheffielcl Scientific School. 

Cornell University. 



83 



2)elta pbl 

mu (Tbapter. 

IReslDent /iRember. 

Harry Benjamin Charles Nitze. 

active /Iftcmbers. 

1897. 
Lawrence Rust Lee. 

1898. 

Horatio Francis Brown, 

Robert Edward Lee George, 
Went WORTH Greene Hare, 

Edmund Harrison Symington, 
William Bell Wood. 

1899. 
Rudolph Degener, 

Paul Gerhard Ludiger Hilken, 

John Read Pettit. 

1900. 
Alan Craig Dodson, 

Truman Monroe Dodson, 

Alexander Duffield Robb 

84 



Ip8i IDlpsilon. 



IRolI of active Cbaptere, 



Theta, 

Delta, 

Beta, 

Sigma, 

Gamma, 

Zeta, 

Lambda, 

Kappa, 

Psi, . 

Xi, 

Upsilon, 

Iota, 

Phi, 

Pi, 

Chi, 

Beta Beta, 

Eta, 

Tau, 

Mu, 

Rho, 



Union College. 

New York University. 

Yale University. 

Brown University. 

Amherst College. 

Dartmouth College. 

Columbia College. 

Bowdoin College. 

Hamilton College. 

Wesleyan University. 

University of Rochester. 

Kenyon College. 

University of Michigan. 

Syracuse University. 

Cornell University. 

Trinity College. 

Lehigh University. 

University of Pennsylvania. 

University of Minnesota. 

University of Wisconsin. 



85 



Ipsi XTlpsilon. 

leta Chapter. 

J- 

Hn jfacultate. 

Edmund Morris Hyde, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., B B^ 1873, 

Edward Higginson Williams, Jr., B.A., E M., B, 1872, 
Preston Albert Lambert, B.A., H., 1883, 

Lewis Buckley Semple, M.A., Ph.D.,i?, 1884. 

1fn Tllrbe. 

Rev. George Milton Brodhead, A.B., A.M., 3, 1882, 
Garrett Linderman Hoppes, C. E., if, 1883, 
Henry Oliver Duerr, K, 1890, 

Robert Sayre Taylor, B.S.,H, 1895. 



In TUniversitate. 

1897. 
Louis Diven, George Duncan Heisey, 

William Burke Brady, 



William Adams Megraw. 



James Ralph Farwell, Benjamin DeWitt Riegel, 

George Craig Leidy, George Loomis Robinson, 

Theodore Benjamin Wood. 



1899. 



Frank Elliott Bradenbaugh, 
Harry Edward Knight, 
Clark Miles Knight, 



James Burr Reddig, 
Theodore Cuyler Visscher, 
George Herbert Wood. 



1900. 
Morrow Chamberlain, 



Ubeta IDelta Cbi. 



FOUNDED AT UNION COLLEGE, I 847. 



^ 



IRoIl of active Chapters. 







Established, 


Beta, 


Cornell University, 


1890 


Gamma Deuteron, 


University of Michigan, 


. 1889 


Epsilon Deuteron, . 


Yale University, 


1887 


Zeta, 


Brown University, 


• 1853 


Eta, .... 


Bowdoin College, 


1854 


Theta, . 


. Kenyon College, 


• 1854 


Iota (1856), . 


Harvard University, 


1892 


Iota Deuteron, . 


Williams College, 


. 189I 


Kappa, 


Tufts College, 


1856 


Lambda, 


Boston University, 


. 1876 


Mu Deuteron, . 


Amherst College, . 


1885 


Nu Deuteron, 


. Lehigh University, 


. 1884 


Xi, .... 


Hobart College, 


1857 


Omicron Deuteron, 


Dartmouth College, 


. 1869 


Pi Deuteron, . 


College of City of New York, 


1881 


Rho Deuteron, . 


Columbia College, . 


1883 


Tau Deuteron, 


University of Minnesota, 


. 1892 


Phi, 


Lafayette College, . 


1866 


Chi (1867), 


University of Rochester, 


. 1892 


Psi, 


Hamilton College, . 


1867 


Sigma Deuteron, 


Wisconsin, .... 


• 1895 


Chi Deuteron, 


. Columbian University, . 
87 


1896. 



ITbeta 2)elta Cbl 

mil Beuteron Charge. 

TResiDent /iRembers. 
Harry T. Morris, Frank J. Myers, 

Horace A. Luckenbach, Archibald Johnston, 

J. George Lehman, Harry M. Ullmann, Ph.D., 

William B. Shober, Ph.D., Charles E. Pettinos, 

John Sidney Heilig, Walter R. Okeson. 

1Ilii&cr=(5raJMiate /iRembers. 

1897. 

Benjamin J. Drake, Harry S. Johnson, 

Samuel P. Senior, William S. Hiester, 

Frank P. Smith, O. Zell Howard, 

Frederick C. Wettlaufer. 

1898. 

Stuart J. Gass. 

1S99. 
Eugene G. Grace, J. Walter Gannon, 

Ray R. Hornor, J.Wesley Grace, 

Edward A. Keys. 

1900. 
Donald C. Fugitt, John H. Pomeroy. 



w 





Div^ka.Phan. 



Belta XDlpsilon. 



J- 



IRoll of active Cbaptere. 







Established. 


Williams, 


. Williams College, 


. 1834 


Union, 


Union College, 


1838 


Hamilton, 


. Hamilton College, 


1847 


Amherst, 


Amherst College, . 


1847 


Adelbert, 


. Adelbert College, 


■ 1847 


Colby, 


Colby University, . 


I«52 


Rochester, . 


. Rochester University, 


• 1852 


Middlebury, 


Middlebury College, 


1856 


Rutgers, 


. Rutgers College, 


■ 1858 


Brown, 


Brown University, . 


i860 


Colgate, 


. Colgate University, . 


• 1865 


New York, 


University of New York, 


1865 


Cornell, 


Cornell University, 


. 1869 


Marietta, 


Marietta College, . 


1870 


Syracuse, 


Syracuse University, . 


• f873 


Michigan, 


University of Michigan, . 


1876 


Northwestern 


, . . Northwestern University, 


1880 


Harvard, . 


Harvard University, 


1880 


Wisconsin, . 


. University of Wisconsin, . 


• 1885 


Lafayette, 


Lafayette College, . 


1885 


Columbia, 


Columbia College, 


. .885 


Lehigh, 


Lehigh Universitv, 


1885 


Tufts, . 


. Tufts College, / 


. 1886 


DePauw, . 


DePauw University, 


1887 


Pennsylvania, 


University of Pennsylvania 


. 1888 


Minnesota, 


University of Minnesota, 


1890 


Massachusetts 


, . . Mass. Institute of Technolo 


gy, . 189 1 


BOWDOIN, . 


Bowdoin College, 


1892 


Swarthmore, 


vSwarthmore College, . 


• 1894 


Leland Stanf 


3RD, . Leland Sanford, Jr., Unive 


rsitv, 1895 


California, . 


University of California, 


' • 1895 



89 



IDelta IHpsilon, 

Xebiab Cbapter. 

J. 

Ifn tbe ffacultg. 

Henry Storrs Webb. B.S. 

IRcsiDcjit /Hbcnibcrs. 

Joseph Weaver Adams, Henry Adams, 

Robert Myers Luckenbach. 

TUnDersGra&uate /nbembcrs. 

John Boyt, Lee Holmes Marshall, 

Charles Ford Carman, Charles Pease Matheson, 

Sinclair Wiggins Chiles, George Rohrer Morrow, 

Barton Olmsted Curtis, Frederick Jay Payne, 

Clifford George Dunnells, Carlos Nathaniel vScovil, 

Elliott Bosworth Kitchell, Henry Harger Scovil, 
Warren Worthington. 



QO 




l)rrh-ii Philf. 



Sioma flu. 



IRoU of active Cbapters. 















Established. 


Beta, .... University of Virginia, . . . 1870 


Delta, . 






South Carolina College, . 


. 1874 


Theta, 






L'niversity of Alabama, 






1S74 


Mu, 






University of Georgia, 






1872 


Iota, 






Howard College, 






1S79 


Kappa, . 






North Georgia College, . 






1881 


Lambda, 






Washington and Lee University. 






1882 


Zeta, 






Central University, . 






1883 


Eta, . 






Mercer University, 






1884 


Nu, 






Kansas State University, 








1884 


Xi, 






Emory College, 








1884 


Omicron, 






. Bethel College, 








1884 


Pi, . 






Lehigh University, 








1885 


R 0, . 






Missouri State University, 








1886 


Sigma. 








Vanderbiit University, 








1S86 


Upsilon, 








University of Texas,' 








1886 


Phi, . 








Louisiana State Univer-ity, 








1887 


Chi, 








Cornell University, . .' . 








1888 


Psi, . 








University of North Car -hiia, 








1888 


Beta Theta, 






Alabama A. & M. College, 








1890 


Beta Omicron, 






University of the South. 








1890 


Beta Beta, . 






De Pauw University, 








1S9O 


Delta Theta, . 






Lombard University, . 








1S9I 


Beta Nu, 






Ohio University, 








189I 


: eta Zeta, 






Purdue University, 








189I 


Beta Gamma, 






Missouri Valley College, . 








189I 


Beta Delta, 






Drake University, 








1S9I 


Beta Epsilon, 






Iowa University, 








1891 


Beta Chi, 






Leland Stanford, Jr., University 








1892 


Beta Eta, 






Indiana University. 








1892 


Beta Iota, 






Mount Union College, 








1892 


Beta Psi, 






University of California, 








1802 


Beta Kappa, 






Central College, . 








1802 


Beta Lambda, 






Southwest Kansas College, 








1892 


Beta Phi, 






Tulane University, 








1895 


Beta Rho, 






University of Pennsylvania, . 








1895 


Beta Pi, . 






Universitv of Chicago. 








1895 


Beta Tau, . 






. N. C. A. & M., . . 








1895 


Beta LTpsilon, 






Rose Polji:echnic Institute, 








1895 


Gamma Gamma. 






Albion College, 








1895 


Gamma Ch 


, 






University of Washington, . 








1896 



91 



Sigma IRiu 

1870. 

pi Chapter. 

ESTABLISHED 1885. 

Bctive /niembcrB. 

Frank Breckenridge Bell, 

Marshall Greene Candee, 
Ge(JRGe Ralph Coffin, 

Orrin Satterlee Good, 

Clarence Peter Kennedy, 

Sidney Burbank Merrill, 

Richard Ambrose Warner. 



92 



Ipbi 6amma IDelta* 



IRoll Of active Cbaptere. 



Alpha, 

Eta, 

Lambda, 

Xi, . . . 

Pi, . . . 

Tau, 

Upsilon, 

Psi, 

Omega, 

Alpha Deuteron, 

Beta Deuteron, 

Gamma Deuteron, 

Theta Deuteron, 

Delta Deuteron, 

Zeta, 

Omicron Deuteron, 

Delta Xi, 

Pi Deuteron, 

Delta, 

Rho Deuteron, 



Washington and Jefferson College. 

Marietta College. 

De Pauw University. 

Pennsylvania College. 

Allegheny College 

Hanover College. 

College of the City of New York. 

Wabash College. 

Columbia College. 

Illinois Wesleyan University. 

Roanoke College. 

Knox College. 

Ohio Wesleyan University. 

Hampden-Sidney College. 

Indiana State University. 

Ohio State College. 

University of California. 

Kansas University. 

Bucknell University. 

Wooster Universitv. 



93 



Sigma Deuteron, 

Sigma, 

Lambda Deuteron, 

Zeta Phi, 

Beta Chi, 

Epsilon, 

Kappa Nu, 

Gamma Phi, 

Nu Deuteron, 

Zeta Deuteron, 

Rho Chi, 

Kappa Tau, 

Mu Sigma, 

Omicron, 

Beta, 

Pi Iota, 

Beta Mu, 

Theta Psi, 

Nu Epsilon, 

Lambda Sigma, 

Tau Alpha, 

Mu, . . . 

Chi, 

Alpha Chi, 

Nu, . 



Lafayette College. 

Wittenberg College. 

Denison University. 

William Jewell College. 

Lehigh University. 

University of North Carolina. 

Cornell University. 

Pennsylvania State College. 

Yale University. 

Washington and Lee L^niversity. 

Richmond College. 

University of Tennessee. 

University of Minnesota. 

University of Virginia. 

University of Pennsylvania. 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 

Johns Hopkins University, 

Colgate University. 

. New York University. 

Leland Stamford, Jr., University. 

Trinity College. 

University of Wisconsin. 

Union College. 

Amherst College. 

Bethel College. 



94 



Ipbi (5amma 2)elta, 

Beta Cbi Cbaptcr. 

tin tbe jfacultB. 

H. Wilson Harding, M.A., A, 1854. 

William L. Estes, M.D., 0, 1876. 

IResiDent /iftembcr. 

Albert Geo. Rau, B.S., B X, 1888. 

Bctlvc /iRcmbecs. 

1896. 
Telford Lewis. 

1897. 
Thomas Micks Clinton, George Livingston Yates, 

John Lewis Gross, Jonathan Edward Slade, 

Arthur Perkins Jenks, Columbus William Thorn. 

1898. 

Jose Aristides de Obaldia, 

Edgar Davis Edmonston, Frederick Allen Perley, 

Herbert Myron Daggett. 

1899. 
Henry Ralph Palmer, Lewis Thomas Rainey. 

1900. 

Harry Ivins Magee, Martin Schwerin, 

Herbert Terry Greene. 

95 



Sigma pbl 



IRoIl of active Cbaptera 

Established. 

Alpha of New York, . Union College, . . . 1827 

Beta of New York, . Hamilton College, . . 183 [ 

Alpha of Massachusetts, Williams College, . . . 1834 

Delta of New York, . Hobart College, . . 1840 

Alpha of A'ermont, . University of Vermont, . . 1845 

Alpha of Michigan, . University of Michigan, . 1858 

Alpha of Pennsylvania, Lehigh University, . . 1887 

Epsilon of New York, Cornell University, . . 1890 



96 



stoma Ipbi. 



1827. 



aipba of ipenns^Ivania. 



IResiOent /llbembevs. 

Robert Packer Linderman, Edward Morton McIlvain, 

RoLLiN Henry Wilbur, Warren Abbott Wilbur, 

William Heysham Sayre, Jr., Ralf Ridgway Hillman, 
Garrett Brodhead Linderman, Robert Crittenden Segur, 
Charles Philip Coleman, Edgar Randolph Reets, 

Philip Sidney Webb, Elisha Packer Wilbur. Jr., 

George Goddard Converse, William Wheeler Coleman, 

Joseph Wharton Thurston. 

TUnDerseraDiiate /Bbembers. 

Henry Hamilton Seabrook, Charles Marshall Barton, 

Stuart Rhett Elliott, William Wharton Thurston, 

William Gummere, Edward Darling Hillman, 

James Cuthbert Holderness, George Reifsnyder Jackson, 

David Hastings Canfield, Ferdinand William Roebling, 

William Townsend White, David Graham McGavock. 



97 



pbi 

IRoIl 

Ohio Alpha, 
Indiana Alpha, 
Kentucky Alpha, 
Indiana Beta, . 
Wisconsin Alpha, 
Illinois Alpha, 
Indiana Gamma, . 
Ohio Beta, 
Indiana Delta, . 
Michigan Alpha, 
Ohio Gamma, 
Indiana Epsilon, 
Indiana Zeta, 
Virginia Alpha, 
Missouri Alpha, . 
Illinois Delta, 
Iowa Alpha, 
Georgia Alpha, 
Georgia Beta, 
Georgia Gamma, 
New York Alpha, 
Ohio Delta, 
Pennsylvania Alpha, 
California Alpha, . 
Michigan Beta, . 
Virginia Beta, 
Virginia Gamma, 
Ohio Epsilon, . 
Nebraska Alpha, 
Virginia Delta, 
Pennsylvania Beta, 



H)elta XTbeta. 

of active Cbaptere. 



Estabiished. 


Miami University, 


1848 


Indiana University, 


1849 


Centre College, 


• 1850 


Wabash College, 


1852 


University of Wisconsin, 


• 1857 


Northwestern University, 


1859 


Butler University, 


• 1859 


Ohio Wesleyan University, 


i860 


Franklin College, 


. i860 


University of Michigan, . 


1864 


Ohio University, 


. 1868 


Hanover College, 


1868 


DePauw University, . 


. 1868 


Roanoke College, . 


1869 


University of Missouri, 


. 1870 


Knox College, 


1871 


Iowa Wesleyan University, 


. 1871 


University of Georgia, 


1871 


Emory College, . 


1871 


Mercer University, . 


1872 


Cornell University, 


. 1872 


University of Wooster, . 


1872 


Lafayette College, 


• 1873 


University of California, 


1873 


Michigan Agricultural College, 


. 1S73 


University of Virginia, . 


1873 


Randolph-Macon College, . 


■ 1873 


Buchtel College, 


1875 


University of Nebraska, 


• 1875 


Richmond College, . 


1875 


Pennsylvania College, 


. 1875 


98 





Penxsvlvania Gamma, 
Tennessee Alpha, 
Mississippi Alpha, 
Virginia Epsilon, 
Illinois Zeta, . 
Alabama Beta, 
Pennsylvania Delta, 
Vermont Alpha, . 
Pennsylvania Epsilon, 
Missouri Beta, 
Iowa Beta, 

South Carolina Beta, 
Kansas Alpha, 
Michigan Gamma, 
Tennessee Beta, 
Ohio Zeta, . 
Texas Beta, 
Pennsylvania Zeta, 
New York Beta, 
New York Gamma, 
Maine Alpha, . 
New York Delta, 
New Hampshire Alpha, 
North Carolina Beta, 
Kentucky Delta, 
Massachusetts Alpha, 
Texas Gamma, . 
Alabama Gamma, . 
Virginia Zeta, . 
New York Epsilon, 
Pennsylvania Eta, . 
Massachusetts Beta, . 
Rhode Island Alpha, 
Louisiana Alpha, 
California Beta. 



Washington and Jefferson College, 1875 

Vanderbilt University, . . 1876 

University of Mississippi, . 1877 

Virginia Military Institute, . 1878 

Illinois Wesleyan University, . 1878 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute, . 1879 

Allegheny College, . . . 1879 

University of Vermont, . . 1879 

Dickinson College, . . . 1880 

Westminster College, . . 1880 

State University of Iowa, . 1882 

South Carolina College, . 1882 

University of Kansas, . 1882 

Hillsdale College, . .1882 

University of the South, 1883 

Ohio State University, 1883 

University of Texas, . . 1883 

University of Pennsylvania, 1883 

Union College, . . . 1883 

College of the City of New York. 1884 

Colby University, . . . 1884 

Columbia College, . 1884 

Dartmouth College, . . 1884 

University of North Carolina, . 1885 

Central University, . . 1885 

Williams College, . . .1886 

Southwestern University, . 1886 

Southern University, . . 1886 

Washington and Lee L^niversity, 1887 

vSyracuse University, . . . 1887 

Lehigh University, . . 1887 

Amherst College, . . . 1888 

Brown University, . . 1888 

Tulane University of Louisiana, 1889 

Leland Stanford, Jr., University, 1891 



99 



pbi 2)elta tlbeta. 



^ 



Pennsylvania lEta Cbaptcr. 



IReelDent /iRember. 
G. M. Harleman, C.E. 



*QlnJ>crs(3raDuates. 

Charles Schwartze Bowers, John Peake Reynolds, 

Woodford Royce, 
Arthur Harold Serrell, 
Martin Shaaff Stockett, 
Robert Maximilian Straub, 



AuGUSTE Leopold Saltzman, 
Daniel Franklin B. Shepp, 
Paul Beno Straub, 
Charles Parker Wagoner. 



Sigma Cbi* 

IRoll of Hctive Cbaptere. 



Alpha, 

Gamma, 

Epsilon, 

Zeta, 

Eta, 

Theta, 

Kappa, 

Lambda, 

Mu, 

Xi, 

Omicron, . 

Rho, 

Chi, 

Psi, 

Omega, 

Alpha Alpha, 

Gamma Gamma, 

Delta Delta, 

Delta Chi, 

Zeta Zeta, 

Zeta Psi, 



Miami University. 

Ohio Wesleyan University. 

Columbian University. 

Washington and Lee University. 

University of Mississippi. 

Gettysburg College. 

Bucknell University. 

Indiana University. 

Denison L^niversity. 

DePauw University. 

Dickinson College. 

Butler University. 

Hanover College. 

University of Virginia. 

Northwestern University. 

Hobart College. 

Randolph-Macon College. 

. Purdue University. 

. Wabash College. 

Centre College. 

University of Cincinnati. 



Eta Eta, 
Kappa Kappa, 
Lambda Lambda, 
Sigma Sigma, 
Alpha Beta, 
Alpha Gamma, 
Alpha Epsilon, 
Alpha Zeta, 
Alpha Theta, 
Alpha Iota, 
Alpha Lambda, 
Alpha Nu, 
Alpha Xi, 
Alpha Omicron, 
Alpha Pi, 
Alpha Rho, 
Alpha Sigma, 
Alpha Tau, 
Alpha Upsilon, 
Alpha Phi, 
Alpha Chi, 
Alpha Psi, 
Alpha Omega, 
Nu Nu, 



Dartmouth College. 

University of Illinois. 

Kentucky State College. 

Hampden-Sidney College, 

University of California. 

Ohio State University. 

University of Nebraska. 

Beloit College. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Illinois Wesleyan University. 

University of Wisconsin. 

University of Texas. 

University of Kansas, 

Tulane University. 

Albion College. 

Lehigh University, 

University of Minnesota. 

University of North Carolina. 

University of Southern California. 

Cornell University. 

Pennsylvania State College. 

Vanderbilt University. 

Leland Stanford, Jr., University. 

Columbia College. 



Sitjma Cbi jfraternit^, 

aipba IRho Chapter. 

J- 

1Re6ii?ent /llbembers. 

W. B. Myers, E. J. Lipps. 

William L. Pettit, Jr., Robt. E. Laramy. 

lp06ts(3raDuate /llb:mber. 

E. Williamson Miller. 

■ClnDecsQraDuate /Iftcmbers. 

EuGEXE Peronnean Roundey, 

Leonard Sherman Horner, 

Arthur Octavius Knight, 
Linden Erle Edgar, 

Clarence Albert Loomis, 
George Dayies, 

Percy Lawrence Reed, 

George Bassett Williams, 

George Augustus Horne, 
Robt. Farnham, Jr., 

Edmund Tro\vbridge Satchell, 
Louis Benjamin Abbott, 

Arthur Benjamin Anderson. 



Belta XTau Belta. 



jt 



Cbaptcr IR0IL 



Alpha, 

Beta, 

Gamma, 

Delta, 

Epsilon, 

Zeta, 

Iota, 

Kappa, 

Mu, 

Phi, 

Chi, 

Pi, 

Lambda, 
Rho, 
Upsilon, 
Nu, 

Omicron, . 
Beta Alpha, 
Beta Beta, 
Beta Gamma, 
Beta Delta, 
Beta Epsilon, 
Beta Zeta, 
Beta Lambda, 
Beta Mu, 
Beta Nu, 
Beta Xi, . 
Beta Omicron, 
Beta Pi, . 
Beta Rho, 
Beta Tau, 
Beta Upstlon, 
Beta Phi, 
Beta Chi, 
Beta Psi, 
Beta Theta, . 
Beta Eta, 
Beta Kappa, 
Sigma, 



Allegheny College 
Ohio University- 
Washington and Jefferson College 
University of Michigan 
. Albion College 
Adelbert College 
Michigan State College 
. Hillsdale College 
Ohio Wesleyan University 
Washington and Lee University 
Kenyon College 
. University of Mississippi 
. Vanderbilt University 
. Stevens Institute of Technology 
Rensselear Polytechnic Institute 
University of Pennsylvania 
University of Iowa 
Indiana University 
De Pauw University 
University of Wisconsin 
. University of Georgia 
Emory College 
Butler College 
. Lehigh University 
Tufts College 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Tulane University 
. Cornell University 
Northwestern University 
Stanford University 
University of Nebraska 
University of Illinois 
. Ohio State University 
Brown University 
. Wabash College 
University of the South 
University of Minnesota 
University of Colorado 
Williams College 



104 



'^^- 



A')-/i 



h- 



rirfka.PhtlM. 



Belta XTau 2)elta. 

J- 

36eta Xambba Cbapter. 

ESTABLISHED 1 888. 

IResiDent /nbember. 

John Taylor. 

mnDcrsGra&uatc /IRembers. 

1898. 
Hexry Bruner Hershey, 

George Kennedy McGunxegle, 

Samuel Augustus Yorks, Jr 

1899. 

Robert Hopkins Moffitt, Jr., 

Joseph DeWalt Wentling, 

Wright Youtsey. 

1900. 
Thomas Windle Lukens, Reginald Weller Bours. 



Beta ^beta pi 



IRoH of Chapters, 



Eta, 
Kappa, 
Upsilon, 
Beta Eta, 
Beta Iota, 
Alpha Omega, 
Mu Epsilon, . 
Sigma, 

Beta Delta, 
Beta Zeta, 
Beta Theta, 
Mu, . 

Alpha Alpha, 
Beta Epsilon, 
Alpha Sigma, 
Alpha Chi, 
Alpha Upsilon, 
Zeta, 
Eta Beta, 
Omicron, 
Phi Alpha, 
Epsilon, 
Mu, 

Beta Beta, 
Beta Lambda, 
Beta Omicron, . 
Alpha, . 
Beta Nu, . 



Harvard University. 

Brown University. 

Boston University. 

Maine State College, 

Amherst University. 

Dartmouth College. 

Wesleyan College. 

Stc en-; Institute of Technology. 

Cornell University. 

St. Lawrence University. 

Colgate University. 

Union College. 

. Columbia College, 

. Syracuse University. 

Dickinson College. 

Johns Hopkins University. 

Pennsylvania State College. 

Hampden-Sidney College. 

North Carolina University. 

University of Virginia. 

Davidson University. 

. Centre College. 

Cumberland University. 

Mississippi University. 

Vanderbilt University. 

Texas University. 

. Miami University. 

University of Cincinnati. 



io6 



Beta Kappa, . 

Beta, . 

Gamma, . 

Theta, 

Psi, 

Alph4 Gamma, . 

Alpha Eta. 

Alpha Lambda, . 

Beta Alpha, . 

Theta Delta, 

Delta, 

Pi, . . . 

Lambda, . 

Tau, . 

Iota, 

Alpha Xi, . 

Chi, 

Alpha Beta, 

Alpha Epsilon, 

Alpha Pi, . 

Rho, 

Beta Pi, 

Alpha Delta, 

Omega, 

Alpha Nu, 

Alpha Zeta, 

Alpha Tau, 

Zeta Phi, . 

Beta Chi, 

Beta Gamma, 

Phi Chi, . 

Lambda Rho, 

Lambda vSigma, 

Phi, . 



Ohio L^niversity. 

Western Reserve University. 

Washington and Jefferson College. 

. Ohio Wesleyan University. 

Bethany College. 

Wittenberg College. 

Denison University. 

Wooster University. 

Kenyon College. 

Ohio State L'niversity. 

De Pauw University. 

Indiana University. 

. University of Michigan. 

Wabash L'niversity. 

Hanover College. 

Knox College. 

Beloit College. 

Iowa State University. 

Iowa Wesleyan University. 

Wisconsin L'niversity. 

Northwestern University. 

University of Minnesota. 

Westminster College. 

University of California. 

University of Kansas. 

Denver University. 

Nebraska University. 

University of Missouri. 

. Lehigh University. 

Rutgers College. 

Yale University. 

Chicago L^niversity. 

Leland Stanford, Jr., University. 

University of Pennsylvania. 



Beta ^beta Ipi. 

1839. 

J- 

36cta Cbi Cbapten 

fln tbc dfacult^. 

Charles L. Thornburg, C.E., Ph.D. 

J. Grant Cramer, A.M. 

John Hutcheson Ogburn, C. E. 

IRcslOent /IReniber. 

George Francis Pettinos, M. E. 

"dnDcrs^raDuate /Iftembers. 

1S97. 
Harry Layfielb Bell, Francis du Pont Ammen, 

Barry MacNutt. 

1898. 
Frank Hammond Gunsolus, D'Arcy Wentworth Roper. 

1899. 
Bernard Todd Converse. 

1900. 
Hugh Banks Chapman, John Francis Benson. 

108 



Ikappa Hlpba- 



jfc 



IRoII of Chapters, 

New York Alpha^ . Union College, 

Massachusetts Alpha, Williams College, 



New York Beta, 
New Jersey Alpha, 
Virginia Alpha, 
New York Gamma, 
Ontario Alpha, 
Pennsylvania xA.lpha, 



Hobart College, 
Princeton University, 
University of Virginia, 
Cornell University, 
Toronto University, 
Lehigh University, 



Esti 


iblished 




1825 




1B33 




1844 


1852- 


-1855 


1857- 


-i860 




1868 




1892 




1894 



loq 



Ikappa Hlpba, 

1825. 

pcnne^Ivania aipba. 

J' 

•ffn J'acultate. 

William H. Chandler, Ph.D. 



THiiDers^raDuates. 

1897. 

Henry J. Biddle Baird, Lathrop Hutchings Baldwin, 

Harrison Ricord Van Duyne. 

1898. 

Charles Bartlett Warren, Charles Edward Webster, Jr., 
Edward Hileman Waring. 

1899. 
Russell Kimball, James Flanders Middledith. 

1900. 
John Ralph V^an Duyne. 



Cbi Ipsi. 



FOUNDED AT UNION COLLEGE, 1841. 



active Blpbae, 







Established. 


Alpha Pi, . 


Union College, . 


. 184I 


Alpha Theta, 


Williams College, . 


1842 


Alpha Mu, . 


Aliddlebury College, . 


. 1843 


Alpha Alpha, 


Wesleyan University, 


1844 


Alpha Phi, . 


Hamilton College, 


. 1845 


Alpha Epsilon, 


University of Michigan, 


1845 


Alpha Upsilon, 


Furman University, . 


■ 1858 


Alpha Beta. 


University of South Carolina, 


1858 


Alpha Chi, . 


Amherst College, 


. 1864 


Alpha Psi, 


Cornell University, 


1869 


Alpha Tau, 


Wofford College, 


. 1869 


Alpha Nu, 


University of Minnesota. 


1874 


Alpha Iota, 


University of Wisconsin. 


. 1878 


Alpha Rho, 


Rutgers College, . 


1879 


Alpha Xi, 


Stevens Institute, 


. 1883 


Alpha Alpha Delta, 


University of Georgia, . 


1890 


Alpha Beta Delta, 


Lehigh University, 


• 1894 


Alpha Gamma Delta, 


Leland Stanford University, . 


1894 


Alpha Delta Delta, . 


University of California, 


• 1895 



Cbi lp8i. 

aipba Beta 2)elta. 

ESTABLISHED I 894. 
J- 

irn jfacultate. 

Ralph McIntosh Wilcox, Ph.B. 



Iln "Universitate. 
Arthur Frost Loomis, B. Roland vSmoot, 

Harry Leigh Adams, Arthur Bradley Hanscom, 

Ambrose Everett Yohn, Paul Kline, 

Oscar Cooper Hannum, Arthur Rose Parsons, 

Carl Pivany Nachod, William Penn White, 

John Alvin vStrauss. 



Members of jFraternitiee bavino no 
Cbapter at Xebiob. 



Gilbert Case White, .... Phi Kappa Sigma. 

John Brown Lindsey, Jr., . . Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

Carl Edward Maeder, .... Kappa Sigma. 



^ 



Summary. 



No. 

Members. X$ ATfl J5> Wl'' &JX JT 2N $rJ 2<? fJ& 2X ATA BOn KA XW Chap. Total. 

Resident, 511383 1151411 44 

Faculty, 4212 311 14 

Post Graduates, i r 2 

Seniors, 21147426371 333 i 48 

Juniors, 1551313 2263 232 i 40 

Sophomores, 113652 23133121 34 

Freshmen, 453124434 33 215 i 45 

Total, 12 9 13 23 25 17 7 iS 27 II 18 10 12 10 12 3 227 



113 







{^-"^^^"^^/^h^^^ 



Qtnccve IS96=='97. 

President, 
Louis O. Emmerich, '82, Hazelton, Pa. 

Viec-Prcsidents, 

Charles E. Ronaldson, '69, New York City, 

Arthur E. Meaker, '75, Bethlehem, Pa. 

Secretary and Treasurer, 
Harry H, Stoek, '87, State College, Pa. 



114 



IF^onorar^ Hlumni trustees. 

Dr. Washington H. Baker, '73, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Term expires June, 1897.) 

Thomas M. Eynon, '81, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(Term expires June, 1898.) 

Dr. H. R. Price, '70, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
(Term expires June, 1S9Q.) 

W. Arthur Lathrop, '74, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
(Term expires June, 1900.) 



Executive Coinmittee. 

Louis O. Emmerich, '82, Chairman, 
Washington H. Baker, '73, W. Arthur Lathrop, '75, 

Thomas M. Eynon, 'Si, Charles E. Ronaldson, '69, 

H. R. Price, '70, Arthur E. Meaker, '75, 

Harry H. Stoek, '87. 



IT5 



Xocal Hluinni 
Clubs anb Hssociations. 

* tlbe Xebiiib IHniversit^ Club of tbc Cit^ of 
mew I^or!^. 

Robert G. Cooke, '84, ..... President. 

Dr. Henry R. Price, '70, . . . First Vice-President. 

Charles E. Ronaldson, '69, . . . Second Vice-President. 

Charles McK. Leoser, '91, . . Secretary. 

Robert B. Honeyman, '88, ..... Treasurer. 

\ (34 Beaver Street, New York City.) 

J- 

*^be Xcbiob Club of pittsbunj. 

Chas. L. Taylor, '76. . . . . . President. 

H. A. Porterfield, '83, .... First Vice-President. 

R. S. Masson, "92, . . . . . Second Vice-President. 

C. M. Tolman, '85, / 77 .• /- 

„_ ^ ^ , r • • • • Executive Committee. 

W. A. Cornelius, 89, ! 

E. H. Beazell, '90, . . . Secretary and Treasurer. 

f (Room 141 8, Carnegie Building, Pittsburg, Pa.) 

Cbe Xebiob ITluivcreit^ Club of Ma0biut3ton, 2). C. 

Felix Freyhold, '85, . . . . . . President. 

Alfred DooLiTTLE, '87, | .... Vice-Presidents. 

Ralph P. Barnard, '89, ) 

Ralph W. Lee, '87, .... Secretary and Treasurer. 

t (606 14th Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.) 



* These are the officers of last year; those for the present year could not be obtained in time for 
insertion. 

+ Secretary's address. 

116 



^be XebiGb ITlmvcreit^ Club of IRortbcastcrn 
Ipenns^lvania. 

W. H. Deax, '86, President. 

H. W. Rowley, '85, Vice-President. 

Arthur Long, '89, .... Secretary and Treasurer. 

* (Cor. West Market St. and Public Square, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.) 

^bc Xebitjb Tllnivcrsit^ Club of Cbicago, 

Charles L. Jenness, '84, ..... President. 

Richard Floyd, '94, ..... Vice-President. 

James H. Westcott, Jr., '89, . . Secretary and Treasurer. 

* (Suite, 513 Ashland Block, Clark and Randolph Sts., Chicago, 111.) 



^be Xebitjb "ITlnivcrsit^ Club of pbilabelpbia. 

Dr. Harry Toulmin, '86, ..... President. 

AlBAN EaYEXSON, '91, / rr- n • 7 

, T ^^ . r .... Vice- r residents. 

J. L. JNeufeld, 94, ) 

E. N. WiGFALL, '95, ...... Secretary. 

W. D. Beatty, '88 Treasurer. 

C. W. Haixes. '74. / 

Dr. W. H. Baker, '73, f Trustees. 

* (1S22 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa.) 



* Secretary's address. 

117 











Mk a D 



'I 



^(%- 



■y-s'e 



If 



^au Beta pi 

aipba of ipcnn0^1vania. 




aDvisorg JBoaro. 

E. H. Williams, Jr., '75, Joseph Barrell, '92, 

Geo. a. Jenkins, '70, Henry B. Evans, '93. 

tbonorarg /Iftembevs. 

Lester P. Breckenridge, Yale, S.S.S., '81, 
Thomas M. Drown, LL.D., Charles L. Doolittle, C.E., 

John J. Feather, Yale, S.S.vS., '85, 

Lionel R. Lenox, M.S., Joseph W. Richards, '86, 

James E. Talmage, '91. 

©tficers. 

A. E. YoHN, President. 

John Boyt, Vice-President. 

R. C. NoERR, . . Corresponding Secretary. 

Woodford Royce, . . . Recording Secretary. 
Wm. R. Binklev, .... Treasurer. 

119 



XTau Beta pi 

J- 

(Brabuatc riDcmbcrs. 



Allgaier, William A., '94, 
Arbenz, Herman L., '95, 
Atticks, Harry J., '93, 
Ayers, Hobart B. , '96, 
Baird, Robert L., '92, 
Barren, Joseph, '92, 
Barren, Robert W., '87, 
Bastress, John N., '92. 
Bastress, Rollin C, '95, 
Baton. Geo. W., '94, 
Bayard, Fairfax, '96, 
Beach, Harry W., '95, 
Beck, Herbert H., '96, 
Birney, Theo. W., '85. 
Bland, Geo. P., '72, 
Bleim, Daniel W., 96, 
Boyd, William I., '93, 
Briggs, Geo., '91, 
Bromer, Frank S., '96, 
Brooks, James E., '95, 
Brown, Eugene C, '95, 
Brown, Rezeau B., '94, 
Bucher, Maximilian J., '96, 
Bull, Charles, '78. 
Burley, James L,, '94, 
Butler. Chas N., '88, 
Buvinger, George A., '06, 
Carman, Francis J . 'Sg. 
Carrington, Malcolm, '96, 
Case, Chas M., '92, 
Case, Geo. P., '92, 
Chao, Emanuel, '91, 
Clerc, Frank L., '71, 
Clift, Arthur S., '95, 
Cobb, Philip L., '92, 
Coleman, Fred A., '92, 
Collier, W. J , '95, 



Cooke, Frank L. '96, 
Cressman, Warren F., '93, 
Cresson, Warder, '91, 
Cunningham, Benj. A., '87, 
Cushing, Sam'l D., '92, 
Davenport, Lewis B., '96, 
Davis, Wm. R., '92, 
Dean, Wm H., '86, 
DeMoyer, Jno. W., '90, 
Dessauer, Samuel M., '96, 
DeWitt, Philip H., '88, 
Domenech, Manuel V., '88, 
Duck, Geo. F., '83. 
Duncan, Murray M., '80, 
Durffee, Chas. H., '93, 
Eavenson, Alban, '01, 
Eckfeldt, Howard, '05, 
Eden, Timothy S., 'g'l, 
Evans, Henry B., '93, 
Fehnel, Milton H., '87, 
Ferriday, Robert, '94, 
Ferris, Walter, '95, 
Fisher, Frank R., 'go, 
Fisher, Fred E., '90. 
Flory, Curtis B., '96. 
Forstall Alfred E., '83, 
Forstall, Walton, '01, 
Gaston, Louis P., '88, 
Gibson, John J., '95, 
Glover, James B., '88, 
Goldsmith, Nat'l O., '83, 
Grammar, F. Louis, '89, 
Gray, Chas. W., '81, 
Griggs, John S., '91, 
Grissinger, Elwood A., '04, 
Grossart, Lewis J. H., '86, 
Hall, David, '96. 



Hall, Wm.McC, '94. 
Hallock, Fletcher D., '94, 
Hartshorne, Wm. D. , '74, 
Hanvi, Solomou J., '86, 
Hazleton, Simeon C., '86^ 
Heck, Robt. C. H., '93. 
Heikes, Erving A., '85, 
Heindle, Wm A., '91, 
Henderson, Lightner, '89, 
Henshaw, Arthur W., '94. 
Herr, Harry N., '96, 
Hersh, John F., '91, 
Hess, Howard ID. , '96, 
Hittell, John B.. '87. 
Holz, Matthias H., '94, 
Hopkins, Chas. C, '82, 
Houston, Fred'k K. , '90, 
Howe, Frank P., '78, 
Hudson, Clarence W., '89, 
Jackson, William S., '96, 
Jacoby, Henry S., '77, 
Jenkins, Geo. A., '70, 
Jessup, A. B., '95, 
Kappela, A. S., '95, 
Kavanaugh, Wm. A., '94, 
Keim, Warren B., '95, 
Kulp, Wm. V , '90, 
LaDoo, John W., '87, 
Lannon, Louis, E., '95, 
Lathrop, Wm. A., '75, 
Lawall, Elmer H., '82, 
Leoser, Chas. McK., '91, 
Lister, Alf. E., '92, 
Lockett, John, 89, 
McFarland, Walter A., '88, 
McKenzie, Chas. L., '93, 
McKenzie, S. T., '95, 
Marshall. Chas. D., '88, 
Masson, Raymond, '92, 
Maurice, Geo. H., '93, 
Meaker, Arthur E., '75, 
Merrick, Frank A., '91, 
Millar, Edw'd J., '92, 
Miller, Chas. H., '88, 
Miller, Chas H., '89, 
Miller, Edwin F., '83. 
Miller, Edward W., '96, 
Miller. John S., '95. 
Moffett, Chas. W., '89. 
Mora, Rafael de la, '96, 
Morris, Harry T , "91. 
Morgan, Charles H., '96, 



Mosman, Chas. T., '92, 
Myers, Harry K., '84, 
Mylander, Wm. F., '93, 
Neufeld, Julius L., '94, 
O'Neill, Chas. J., '93, 
Orth, Henry, Jr., '92, 
Osborne, Nathaniel M., '93, 
Parkhurst, Chas. W., '93, 
Payne, Wm. A., '94, 
Peale, Rembrandt R. , '83, 
Perkins, Wm. C, '90, 
Polhemus, James S., '72, 
Pratt, Mason D., '87, 
Price, John B., '85, 
Prindle, Edwin J., '90, 
Quier, Edwin A., '91 
Randolph, Raymond B., '93, 
Reinecke, AV. , Jr., '95, 
Reist, Henry G., 86, 
Rhodes, S. Arthur, '92, 
Richards, Henry, '76, 
Richards, Louden W. , '76, 
Rock, Miles, '69, 
Roller, Frank W., '94, 
Schmitz, Robert, '91, 
Scudder, Wallace M., '73, 
Shelby, Cass K., '92, 
Shero, John E., '95, 
Smith, Agustus P., '84, 
Snvder, Elmer E., '87, 
Spalding, Fred P.. '80, 
Spengler, John H , '86, 
Stackhouse, Edwin S., '86, 
Steinmetz, Edw. G., '95, 
Stevenson, Wm. A., 'go, 
Stilson, Horace T., '91, 
Stockett. Alfred W., 89, 
Stock, Harry H., '87, 
Surls, Joseph K., '86, 
Sykes, Fred G., '94, 
Taylor, Chas L., '76, 
Taylor, Edward E., '96, 
Taylor, Lester C. , '89, 
Thome, John M.. '7c, 
Thomson, John A.. '96, 
Troop, Augustus T., '89, 
Tompkinson, Chas. C, '90, 
Trout, Philip H., '94, 
Tucker, Richard H., '79, 
Turner, Charles P.. '89, 
VanCleve. Aaron H., '90, 
Walker, Clarence, '89, 



Warman, Frederic C, '93, 
Warner, Edward O., '94, 
Warr, Wm., '95, 
Watson, James A., '84, 
Wendle, George E., '91, 
Weymouth, Aubrey, '94, 
White, Harry A., '95, 
Wilkens, Henry A. J., '87, 
Williams, Edw. H., Jr., '75, 



Williams, Frank, '87, 
Wilson, John M., '95, 
Wilson, David W., Jr., '96, 
Wilson, Thomas, W., '94, 
Wolle, Lewis T., '77, 
Wood, Chas. O., '92, 
Wood, Harold L., '95, 
Wooden, Weldon B., '94, 
Wright, Edward A., '89. 



^ 



1Dinber*=(5rabuate flDembere. 



1897. 



Woodford Royce, 
Ambrose E. Yohn, 
Robert C. Noerr, 
William R. Binkley, 
Arthur F. Loomis, 
Samuel P. Senior, 
John Boyt, 
Wallace Treichler, 
Thaddeus Merriman, 



Gilbert C. White, 
Charles S. Bowers, 
Wm. E. Underwood, 
Ralph S. Griswold, 
Henry J. B. Baird, 
Paul B. Straub, 
Carl P. Nachod, 
Wm. B. Brady, 
Frank D. Mount. 



Harold J. Horn, 
Edw. H. Waring, 
John J. Eckfeldt, 



H. S. Zimmerman 
H. C. Paddock, 
L. C. Starkey, 
Wm. A. Dehm. 



Ipbi Beta IF^appa. 




IbonoracB ipresiDents. 

The Rt. Rev. M. A. DeW. Howe, D.D., LL.D., 
Of the Alpha of Rhode Island. 

©fficers. 

The Rev. Geo. PoMEROY Allen, D.D., . . . President. 

Harvey S. Kitchel, A.M., . . . . Vice-President. 

Edward H. Williams, Jr., A.B., A.C., E.M., . Secretary. 

Edmund M. Hyde, A.M., Ph.D., .... Treasurer. 

^bc Cbapter. 

George Pomeroy Allen, Preston Albert Lambert, 

Edmund Morris Hyde, William A. Robinson, 

Harvey Sheldon Kitchel, Lewis Buckley Semple, 

Edward Higginson Williams, Jr. 

/IRembers. 

1871. 
W. H. McCarthy. 

1878. 
Frank P. Howe. 



i88o. 
Thomas Hughlett Hardcastle. 

1882. 
Charles C. Hopkins. 

1883. 
John Daniel Hoffman, Rembrandt Richard Peale, 

Preston Albert Lambert, Henry Allebach Porterfjeld. 

1884. 
Robert Grier Cooke, Augustus Parker Smith, 

Robert Packer Linderman, Lewis Buckley Semple. 

1885. 
William Harvey Cooke. 

1886. 
George Rodney Booth, George Arthur Ruddle, 

Charles Ellsworth Clapp, William Patterson Taylor, 
M. Anthony DeW. Howe, Jr., Harry Toulmin. 

1887. 
Milton Henry Fehnel, Garrett Brodhead Linderman, 

Harvey Sheafe Fisher, Wade Hampton Woods, 

Alfred Kramer Leuckel, Charles Frederick Zimmele. 

1888. 
Charles Lincoln Banks, Albert George Rau, 

•William Lynville Neill, Charles McCombs Wilkens. 

1889. 
Samuel Irwin Berger, William Dolloway Farwell, 

Edgar Campbell, Sylvanus Elmer Lambert. 

1890. 
Aaron Howell Van Cleve, Ellis Anstett Schnabel 

1891. 
Frederick C. Lauderburn, Ira Augustus Shimer, 
William Sidney Topping. 

1892. 
William N. R. Ashmead 

1893. 
Walter Joseph Dech, Alfred Earnest Spiers, 

Charles Malcolm Douglas, George Stern 

1895. 
Elmer Augustus Jacoby, Fayette Avery McKenzie, 

William Allen Lambert, John Eugene Stocker, 

Robert vSayre Taylor. 

1896. 
Warren Joshua Bieber, Robert Edward Laramy, 

Toseph Wharton Thurston 

124 




TResiDent /Iftembers. 

F. W. B. Pyle, G. R. Booth, 

J. W. Thurston. 



Ibonorare iUbcmbers. 

Rev. G. Pomeroy Allex, J. Davis Brodhead, 

L. Clark Davis, Edward Fales Coward. 



active /nbembers. 
Henry T. Irwin, James R. Farwell, 

John B. Lindsey, Jr., E. Harrison Symington, 

Edward D. Hillman. 



126 




^^^tox, 



/Iftembers 

Francis DuPont Ammen, Charles Marshall Barton, 

Harry Layfield Bell, 

Louis Diven, Stuart Rhett Elliott, 

Henry Taylor Irwin, 

Charles Francis Scott, Henry Hamilton Seabrook. 

Harrison Ricord Van Duyne. 



127 




IResiCient /DNcmt'erB. 



C. P. COLEMAX, 
G. B. LiXDERMAN, 

E. M. McIlvaixe. 

W. W. C OLE-MAX, 



E. R. Reets, 
R. H. Wilbur, 
AV. A. Wilbur. 
J. W. Thurstox. 



H. L. Bell. 
S. R. Elliott, 

H. E. Hale. 



1S9; 



H. T. Irwix, 
J. ]\I. Jacksox, 
C. F. Scott. 



D. W. Roper, 

E. D. HlLLMAX. 

F. H. GuxsoLus, 



1898. 



W. GUMMERE. 

H. F. Browx, 

J. B. Lixdsev, Jr. 



12S 



WiMj 




n%jr^r 



Xlbeta IRu Bpsilon. 

ESTABLISHED 1886. 

*C. P. Coleman, *P. S. Webb, H. B. C. Nitze, 

R. R. HiLLMAN, R. H. Wilbur, 

W. A. Wilbur, E. M. McIlvaine, E. P. Wilbur, Jr., 

E. R. Reets, W. W. Coleman, 

J. W. Thurston. 



A. L. Saltzman, 



Ipost Seniors. 



C. P. Wagoner. 



A. H. Serrell, 
G. D. Heisey, 
W. B. Brady, 



Swtiiore. 



F. C. Wettlaufer. 



L. Diven, 

F. H. Gunsolus, 

H. F. Brown, 



^untois. 



James Ralph Farwell, 
Wentworth Greene Hare 
Harry Reese James, 
Ralston Rife Lukens, 
Frank Jacob Meyers, 
Richard Albert Turner, 
Theodore Benjamin Wood, Jr. 



Samuel A. Yorks. 



Robert Edward Lee George, 
Henry Bruner Hershey, 
Spencer Jackson Johnson, 
Sidney Burbank Merrill, 
D'Arcy Wentworth Roper, 
Clarence Barnard, 
William Bell Wood, 



Sopbomores. 



2goooKvco 5 II 
900 :X;^?3aboo 
P3XX — akmnzgl 
Bvit = n : — o4p(.) 
RATmooooZ + 89 
Ccb— |a}pqgt077 
Tun (:) = CO (a) : ? ! ! 

Z O CO 



♦Charter members. 



e y o b 6 k 4 



Za 9=1 

Yooot4.k*p:?! 
Ka=!olntz + : |b} 
9f T oohtz = 4CCS 
Qt — Sabllknnb 
Lb \c\ nt + Saxy : — 
3 a 4 ( : ) 9 t z = CO 1 1 
(a) + : a 



129 



Sociebab IFDispano Hmevicana 

De la 

■^nnivcrsi^at) ^e Xebiob. 

FUNDADA EL 14 DE OcTUBRE DE 1 893. 
J- 

2)irectiva. 

Jose Aristides de Obaldia, '98, . ' . . Presidentc. 

Jose M. Garza Galan, '98, .... Vice-Presidcnte. 

Carlos G. Newton, '98, Secrctario. 

Manuel de la Mora, 1900, ..... Tesorero. 

/Dbiembio Ibonoracio. 

Profesor William C. Thayer. 

/nbiembros Bctivos. 

RiCARDO Becerra, Jr., '98, Estebax a. Mercenario, '97, 

Jose F. Capriles, '99, Rafael de la Mora, '96, M.E., 

Luis Cuesta, Manuel de la Mora, 1900, 

Francisco M. Gallardo, '97, Carlos G. Newton, '98, 

Castulo M. Gallardo. Enrique H. Newton, '97, 

C.ASTULO Gallardo, Jose A. de Obaldia, '98, 

Jose M. G Galan, '98, Gustavo Rovelo, '99, 

Jose G. Gandia, Ricardo S. Landron, '99, 
Arturo Solorzano, 1900. 

/Dbfembros Correeponsales. 

Amado Cavazos, Michigan ^^lining- School. 

Yguacio Zertuche, E.M., Monterrey, Mexico. 

Andres Garza Gal.4n, C.E., Saltillo, Mexico. 

J. DE LA FuENTE, Columbia College, N. Y. 
Ernesto Lefevre, Ex-'96, Panama, Rep. of Columbia. 

J. DE D. Amador, Ex-'97, Panama, Rep. of Columbia. 

PoLiCARPo Melara, Nicaragua, Central America. 
Jose Blanco. Puerto Rico. 

131 



SopHonoRtC 



moit^. 



^f.v^" 



©fficers. 



Wright Youtsey, 
Rudolph Degener, 
R. F. Farnham, 
H. E. Knight, 

P. G. L. HiLKEN, . 



President. 

First Vice-President. 

Second V ice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Erecutivc Committee. 



j. C. ViSSCHER, 

J. B. Reddig, 

F. E. Bradenbaugh, 



G. H. Wood, 

J. F. Middledith, 

G. R. Jackson. 



F. E. Bradenbaugh, 

P. G. L. HiLKEN, 

H. E. Knight, 

R. H. MOFFITT, 

J. C. Visscher, 
W. Youtsey, 

G. B. Williams, 



/Hiembers. 

B. T. Converse, 
G. R. Jackson, 

C. M. Knight, 
J. R. Pettit, 

J. D. Wentling, 
R. F. Farnham. 
A. W. Klein, 



R. Degener, 

R. Kimball, 

J. F. Middledith, 

J. B. Reddig, 

G. H. Wood, 

G. L. Robinson, 

J. S. Viehe, 



j. W. Gannon, 



R. M. Strau] 



132 










©fficers. 



C. G. DUNNELLS, 
P. BUCHER, 
C. F. MORITZ. 



A. E Meaker, 
A. D. Badgley, 
A. Q. Bailev, 
L. W. Bailey, 

P. BuCHER, 

W. A. Dehm, 

C. G, DuNNELLS, 

E. R. Frisby, 



. President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 



/Iftenibers. 

Wm. Gratz, 
Herbert Hess, 
F. N. Kneas, 
T. Merriman, 
W. E. Magie, 
J. F. Morgan, 

C. F. MORITZ, 

J. R. Pettit, 



Wm. Piez, 
V. H. Reid, 
H. C. Schwecke, 
L. C. Starkey, 
W. P. Starkey, 
J. A. Thompson, 
H. S. Zimmerman. 



tournaments. 

Lehigh vs. Lafayette, April 22, 1896. 

Score — Lehigh, 9; Lafayette, 3. 
Lehigh vs. LTniversity of Pennsylvania, May 15, 1896, 

Score — Lehigh, 4; University of Pennsylvania, 8. 

ITcani. 

A D. Badgley, '96. J. A. Thompson, '96. 

D. W. Wilson, '96. C. G. Dunnells, '97. 

Wm. Piez, '99. 

133 



C. F. MORITZ. '( 




©fflcers 



H. J Horn, '98, 
H. H. Hess, '98, 
W. Treichler, '97, 
D. H. Childs, '98, 



President. 

^ice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 



Tan&er=(3raDuates. 

1897. 
T. C. Thomas, 
S P. Senior, 
W. Treichler, 
E. P. Shuman, 

1898. 
H. H. Hess, 
L. S. Horner, 
S. A. YoRKS, Jr., 
D. F. B. Shepp, 
H. J. Horn, 
1899. 
J. K. Ellenbogen, a. Shime 
1900. 
A. D. Heller, N. S. Powell, 

H. S. Stauffer, C. E. Rowe, 

A. H. Gill, C. M. Simmers, 

E. B. Kitchell, W. B. Grubbe, 

H. S. Lewis, W. G. Lessig, 

134 



W. R. BiNKLEY, 

R. N. Hood, 

T. Merriman, 

J. L, Sheppard, Jr., 

J. J. ECKFELDT, 

C. G. Newton, 
R. C. Becerra, 

D. H. Childs, 

H. M. Daggett, Jr., 



S. VV. Chiles, 
B. O. Curtis, 
H. R. Peck. 



V. C. Records, 
J. W. Stauffer, 
H. vS. Zimmerman, 
R. Hazel, 
R. F. Sanchez. 



R. 



L. Ortner, 

J. N. Reese, 
J S. Shultz, 
W. P. Starkey, 
T. K. Yasharian. 




©fficers. 



Lewis Cheston Starkey, '98, 
Wm. Lathrop Meaker, '99, 
Alanson Q. Bailey, '98, 
Wm. Gratz, '98, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 



135 



/iDetnbers. 

Hn jfacultate. 

Lewis Buckley Semple, M.A., Ph.D. 

Ifn XDlnivereitate. 



Clifford G. Dunnells, Ralph S Griswold, Frank D. Mount 
Ira D. Fulmer, Wm. Thos. Hanley, Robert C. Noerr. 



Alanson O. Bailey, Arthur O. Knight, Henry C. Schwecke, 
Paul Bucher, Basil G. Kodjbanoff, Henry H. Scoyil, 

Edgar R. Frisby, Chas. F. Moritz, Lewis C. Starkey, 
Wm. Gratz, Howard C. Paddock, E. H. Symington, 

Frank N. Kneas, Percy L. Reed, Lawrence Wooden, 

Warren Worthington. 

1899. 
Leon W. Bailey, James C. England, Chas. S. Padget, 
Maurice C. Benedict, Arthur W. Klein, Henry R. Palmer, 
Arthur K. Birch, Charles M. Masson, Victor H. Reed, 
John P. Croll, WxM. L. Meaker, Robert S. Shriver, 

Abram p. Steckel, Harry A. Wilcox. 



1900. 

Geo. W. Barager, Wm. B. Grubbe, John N. Reese, 

Albert W. Bayard, Elliott B. Kitchell, Joseph S. Shultz, 
Andrew T. Brice, Wm. G. Lessig, Clayton M. Simmers, 

John W. Fletcher, Wm. E. Magie, Wm. P. Starkey, 

Author H. Gill, Louis Ortner, H. A. Tobelman, Jr., 

John R. Van Duyne. 

136 



Ipenns^lpania IFnter^CoUetjiate 
©ratorical XHnion. 



Officers. 
Ross N. Hood, Lehigh, . . . President. 
John S. Able, Gettysburg, . . Vice-President. 
Wm. H. Kready, Franklin and Marshall, Secretary. 
W. E. Steckle, Muhlenberg, . . Treasurer. 

Erccutive Committee. 
Ross N. Hood, Ex-officio, 

Wm. H. Kready, Ex-ojfficio, 

F. G. Blair, Swathmore, 

John Schenck, Ursinus, 

, Gettysburg. 



jfourtb Hnnual Contest. 

College Hall, Swathmore, Pa., Friday Evening, 
March 20, 1896. 

First Prize — Frank Grant Blair, Swathmore. 
Second Prize — John Frederick Kramlich, Muhlenberg. 



137 




Zhc Seconb Hnnual]|2)ebate* 

Xafa^ettc V6. Xcbicib. 

Friday Evening, May 8, 1896. 
Hall of the Physical Lahoratory, Lehigh University. 

Debaters. 

Lehii::h. Lafayette. 

I. Ross Nathaniel Hood, '97, 2. John Dawson Pierson, '96, 
Duncannon, Pa. Blairstown, N. J. 

3. Le\vis Cheston Starkly, '98, 4. Harvey Klaer, '96, 

Busleion, Pa. Stroudsburg, Pa. 

5. RoiiERT E. Laramy, '96, 6. Samuel Martin. '96, 

Bethlehem, Pa. Altoona, Pa, 

Dr. Tho.mas M. Drown, . . . Chairman. 

JuOges. 
Dr. N. E. Schaeffer, Dr. T. L. Seip, Prof. S. N. Patten. 

Question. 

Resolved: — That the United vStates Government should own 
the Railroads. Zr/zzW^.— Affirmative. 

Lafayette. — Negative. 
The Debate was decided in the Affirmative. 

138 



/ 



) gm^ ^WK" 





James H. Pennington, '97, 
Frank H. Gunsolus, '98, 
Harry A. Wilcox, '99, 



President. 

l^ice President. 

Secretary. 



1897. 
William R. Binklev, James H. Pennington, 

Wallace Treichler, Gilbert C. White. 

1898. 

Frank H. Gunsolus, John B. Lindsey, 

Charles B. Warren. 



1899. 



William L. Meaker, 



Harry A. Wilcox. 



1900. 
David G. McGavock. 



139 



Xebiob XDlnivereit^ Cbristian 
Hesociation. 



©tflcers. 



Ralph S. Griswold, 
David W. Childs, 
Howard C. Paddock, 
Charles S. Padget, 
Arthur K. Birch, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Treasurer. 

Recording Secretary. 

Corresponding Secretary. 



Hctive /lOembers. 



ifacult^. 



Dr. T. M. Drown, 
Prof. W. A. Robinson, 
Prof. C. L. Thornburg, 
Prof. E. H. Williams, 
Mr. F. C. Biggin, 



Mr. J. H. Klinck, 
Mr. a. E. Meaker, 
Dr. J. W. Richards, 
Mr. R. M. Wilcox, 
Mr. C. W. Smith, 



Mr. R. C. H. Heck. 



lP>osts(3raDuates. 

E. S. Cunningham, 

Telford Lewis. 

1897. 

F. B. Bell, W. S. Hiester, 

F. J. Blickensderfer, D. Kennedy, 
S. W. Chiles, B. MacNutt, 

R. S. Griswold, Wm. Megraw, 

G. C. White. 



E. W. Miller, 



F. D. Mount, 
J. H. Pennington, 
F. B. Sheaffer, 
W. E. Underwood, 
T. C. Thomas. 



140 



A. Q. Bailey, 
A. K. Birch, 

P. BUCHER, 

D. W. Childs, 



1898. 

\V. A. Dehm, 
H. J. Horn, 

A. O. Knight, 

B. G. KODJBAXOFF, 



V. C. Records, 



C. F. MORITZ, 

H. C. Paddock, 

H. C. SCHWECRE, 

L. Watts, 



L. C. Starkev, 



L. W. Bailey, 
M. C. Benedict, 
C. F. Carman, 
G. A. Horne, 



1899. 

A. W. Klein, 
G. B. Luten, 
J. C. England, 
W. L. Meaker, 
G. B. Williams. 



C. S. Padget, 
W. H. Spiers, 

J. S. ViEHE, 

H. A. Wilcox, 



G. W. Barager, 
M. S. Black, 
J. W. Fletcher, 
J. Fuller, 
A. H. Gill, 



1900. 

C. F. Gross, 

E. B. Kitchell, 

W. G. Lessig, 

W. G. McVeigh, 

W. E. Magie, 

R. McX. Freeman. 



R. C. Morris, Jr., 
C. M. Simmers, 
\V. P. Starkey, 
H. A. Tobleman, 
T. K. Yasharian, 



R. N. Hood, 
R. C. Noerr, 
W. L. Pettit, 
M. H. Putnam, 



Bssociate /Ibembers. 
H. M. Daggett, Jr., J. F. Morgan, 



W. M. Gratz, 
L. S. Horner, 
L. Wooden, 



J. L. Sheppard, Jr., H. S. Zimmerman, 

J. ^IcVeigh. 



V. H. Reid, 
W. T. Drake, 
H. S. Lewis, 
W. T. McCarthy, 



141 



Xebiob Univev8it\> Supply; ffiureaiu 



ESTABLISHED, DEC. 9, 1892. 



Officers. 



Thaddeus Mekrimax, '97, 
J. Burr Reddig, '99, 
Wallace Treichler, '97, 
*Harrv a. Wilcox. '99, 
Ross X. Hood, '97, 
Harry S. Zimmerman, '98 



President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 
Manager. 
Manager. 
Assistant Manager. 



Bxxccloxs. 



Thaddeus Merrimax, '97, 
Wallace Treichler, '97, 
Ross X. Hood, '97, 
G. L. Yates, "97, 
F. A. Perley, 'q8. 



D. F. B. Shepp, '98, 
H. M. Daggett, Jr , ' 
J. W. Grace, Jr., '99, 
J. B. Reddig, '99, 
C. M. Simmers, 1900. 



♦ Resigned. 



142 




©fficers. 



Thaddeus Merriman, 
Woodford Royce, 
Wallace Treichler, 
Frank B. Scheaffer, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer. 



144 



Civil lEnGineerino Section. 



R. C. NOERR, 

Wallace Treichler, 



©fficers. 



Chairman. 
Secretary atid Treasurer. 



/IDeiubers. 

1897. 



C. M. Barton, 

J. BOYT, 

T. H. Clagett, 
S. W. Chiles, 

B. O. Curtis, 

C. G. Dunnells, 
W. T. Hanly, 

E. A. Mercenario, 
T. Merriman, 

F. D. Mount, 
R. C. Noerr, 



E. P. ROUNDEY, 

C. F. Sanders, 

F. B. Sheaffer, 
E. P. Shuman, 
J. E. Slade, 

M. T. E. Stack, 
T. C. Thomas, 
C. W. Thorn, 
W. Treichler, 
C. P. Wagoner, 

G. C. White. 



A. Barrientos, 
W. A. Dehm, 
J. R. Farwell, 

E. R. Frisby, 

F. H, Gunsolus, 
C. G. Newton, 



J. B. L1N11SEY, 
J. A. De Obaldia, 
H. C. Paddock, 
N. C. Records, 
D. F. B. Shepp, 
L. Wooden, 



H. S. Zimmerman. 



145 



nn^ecbanical Ent3ineeriiu3 Section* 







^ 








©fffcers. 




A. 


E. YOHN, 




Chairman. 


W. 


R. ROYCE, 




. Treasurer. 


H. 


H. Newton, 




Secretary. 



Ibonorar^ /iRembere. 



Joseph F. Klein, D.E., 
Robert C. H. Heck, M.E., 



Leopold O. Danse, M. E., 
Barry H. Jones, E.M. 



F. D. Ammen, 
L. H. Baldwin, 
F. B. Bell, 

A. A. FiNKH, 

F. M. Gallardo, 
J. L. Gross, 



1S97. 

O. Z. Howard, 
H. T. Irwin, 
L, R. Lee, 
H. H. Newton, 
H. R. Peck, 
M. H. Putnam, 



J. P. Reynolds. 

S. S. RiEGEL, 
W. R. ROYCE, 

J. L. Sheppard, 
W. E. Underwood, 
A. E. YoHN. 



J. Ballard, 
H. F, Brown, 
G. Davies, 
J. J. Eckfeldt, 
W. G. Hare, 



A. O. Knight, 

B. G. KODJBANOFF, 

L. H, Marshall, 
B. D. Riegel, 
D. W. Roper, 



E. H. Symington 
E. H. Waring, 
C. B. Warren, 
T. B. Wood. 



146 



XTbe Electrical Enoineerintj Society* 



©fficers. 



W. R. BlXKLEY, . 

A. F. LooMis, . 

I. D. FUL.MER, 

O. S. Good, 



President. 

J ^ice- President. 

Secretary. 

. Treasurer. 



H. L. Bell, 

W. R. BiNKLEY, 

C. S. Bowers, 
T. M. Clinton, 

I. D. FULMER, 

O. S. Good, 

R. S. Griswold, 



Bcttve /lRembei-0. 

W. S. Heister, 
R. N. Hood, 
A. P. Jenks, 
H. S. Johnson, 

A. F, LooMis, 

B. MacNutt, 

C. P. Nachod, 



H. H. Seabrook, 
A. H. Serrell, 
A. R. Sterner, 
C. V. Livingston, 
H. R. Van Duyne, 
G. L. Yates. 



1898. 



H. M. Daggett, Jr., 
W. Gratz, 
H. H. Hess. 



L. S. Horner, 

D. Kennedy, 

T. H. Laavrence. 



A. K. Birch, 



associate /Bbcnibers. 

1899. 



W. E. Arrison. 



148 




©tttcers. 



Charles S. Padget, 
Robert S. Shriver, 



President. 
Secretary and Treasurer. 



Ibonorarg /iftembeie. 

Prof. Mansfield ]\Ierrlman, Ph. D., 
Mr. F C. Biggin, B. S. 

active /Iftenibers. 

Charles S. Padget, '99, David H. Canfield, 1900, 

Robert S. Shriver, '99, Albert D. Hollingsworth, 1900, 

William H. Speirs, '99, Truman M. Dodson, J900, 

George B. Williams, '99, William T. McCarthy, 1900, 

William T. White, 1900. 

149 




Ibonorarg /IRembere. 

W. H. Chandler, Ph.D., F.C.S., F. W. Spanutius, M.S., 

W. B. Shober, Ph.D., H. M. Ullman, Ph.D., 

N. Thurlow, A.C. 
H. H. Beck, '96, M. J. Bucher, '96, 

R. E. Kresge, '96, V. E. Masson, '96, 

L. A. Olxev, '96. 

Bctive /Iftembers. 

B. F. Borhek, '97, P. E. DiNAN, '97, 

R. C. Becerra, '98, H. N. Thatcher. '98, 

vS. B. ;Merrill, '98. W. Ulrich, '98, 

W. GUMMERE, '98, B. SmOOT, '98, 

F. C. Fettlaufer, '98, G. K. McGunnegle, '98. 



150 




A. F. LooiNiis, 

R. C. NOERR, 

W. E. UXDERWOOD, 



I\Ir. p. a. Lambert. 

A. E. YoHN, 
T. Merri-max, 

J. BOYT, 



J. B. LiNDSEY, 

W. A. Dehm, 



/Iftcmbers. 



1897. 



1898. 



. President. 

Vice-Presieient. 

. Seeretarv. 



Mr. H. a. Foering. 

W. R. BlNKLEY, 

G. C. White, 
R. N. Hood. 

H. Horn, 

J. J. ECKFELD'J', 



H. S. Zimmerman. 



151 







*:\?-^^>^^fc"^^«^^s^^^ 







IPT ♦>LEMK3& 



■^*:x^^^ 




iS-i ft' V^ 



I 



k. 



Mm. 



Toot.-;- "^iCK- - - <Bf?.\r=i-\T^Y~i 




JL^ 



/ 



i 




T'F ^^1 






1="! - toEi-Mot-^ico . lYY - rr-t-lr - 








t^tr. 



>-- JL 




JoHx Lewis Gross, 

ESTEBAN A. MeRCIXARIO, 

Henry Taylor Irwix, 
Jonathan Ed\vard Slade, 
Arthur Perkins Jenks, 
Columbus William Thorn, 
Edgar Davis Edmonston, 
Jose Aristides de Obaldia, 



/Dbembers. 

Richard Charles Becerra, 
Frederick Allen Perley, 
Henry Ralph Palmer, 
Percy Lesley Reed, 
Harry Ivins Magee, 
John Kenelm Digby, 
Gavin Hogg Dortch, 
Walter Henry Rodney, 



D. L. Munsen. 



153 




" Pop " Smith, 
"Sleepy" Sheaffer, 
"Colonel" White, 
" Roots " Daggett. 



"T" Lewis, 
"Bull" Rainey. 
" Eva" Greene, 
" Cal " Maeder, 



"Toby" Tobelman. 



154 




Louis Divex, 
George D. Heisev, 
William A. Megraw, 
Willi A-M B. Brady, 
James R. Farwell, 
T. B. Wood, 
G. C. Leidy, 
George L. Robinsox, 



Bexjamix D. Reigel, 
Harry E. Kxight, 
Clark M. Kxight, 
Frank E. Bradenbaugh, 
G. Herbert Wood, 
Theodore C. Visscher, 
J. Burr Reddig, 
Morrow Chamberlaix. 



155 




'pe;-a Jl>q^^ du\. 



{/lEf/iSi^T^-^. 



JOHX HUTCHESON OgBURN, 

Francis DuPoxt Ammen, 
D'Arcy Wentworth Roper, 
Hugh Banks Chapman, 



Harry Layfield Bell, 
Frank Hammond Gunsolus, 
Bernard Todd Converse, 
John Francis Benson. 



156 



IATZn/\A 




Ambrose Everett Yohn, 
B. Roland Smoot, Arthur Frost Loomis, 

Paul Kline, Carl Pivany Nachod, 

Arthur Rose Parsons, Harry Leigh Adams, 

William Penn White, Arthur Bradley Hanscom, 

Oscar Cooper Hannum. 



157 



TLhc Starvation Club. 



Wallace Treichler, '97. . . . . President. 

Paul Bucher, '98, Vice-President. 

H. A. Wilcox, '99, Secretary. 

T. H. Lawrence, '98, ...... Treasurer. 

A. Q. Bailey, '98, Steward. 

1897. 

W\ Treichler, C. F. Scott, T. H. Clagett, 

G. L. Yates, T. C. Thomas, R. N. Hood, 

R. C. NoERR, W. R. BiNKLEv, R. S. Griswold, 

T. M. Clinton. 

1898. 

D. F. B. Shepp, H. S. Zimmerman, P. Bucher, 

W\ A. Uehm, T. H. Lawrence, A. Q. Bailky. 

1899. 

C. E. Masson, G. B. Luten, J. T. Morgan, 

A. P. Steckel, H. a. Wilcox. 

1 900. 

C. C. Coutant, J. Fuller, J. G. Ross, 

J. J. Reamer, J. W. Fletcher, A. W. Bayard, 

E. Hug gins. 

ISP 




/Dbembers. 



S. M. Dessauer, 



F. O. DUFOUR. 



F. B. Bell, H. R. Peck, 

I. D. Fulmer, C. F. Sanders, 

W. T. Hanly, M. T. Stack, 

W. E. Underwood, 



D. H. Childs, 
W. Gratz, 
R. Hazel, 

F. X. Kneas, 

B. G. Kodjbanoff, 

L. W. Bailey, 
'M. C. Benedict, 

G. W. Barager, 
A. T. Brice, 

J. \y. Burke, 



1S98. 



1899. 



1900. 



H. C. Paddock, 
V. C. Records, 
H. C. Schwecke, 
L. C. Starkey, 
L. Wooden. 

j. C. England, 
R. S. Shriver. 



T. F. Bell, 
J. J. Brice, 
W. T. Drake. 



160 




CAMPUS IN SUMMER. 



CHE usual order of events of University week, were, last year, 
carried out with little variation from the usual order. The 
Cremation of Calculus and Concert Promenade given by 
Ninety-Eight, on Saturday evening, was the beginning of the 
festivities and was enjoyed by the immense number present. The 
Senior banquet was held on the evening before, at the Summit 
House, Reading, and was a complete success. The Baccalaureate 
sermon was delivered on Sunday, the fifteenth, by Rev. William B. 
Bodine, D.D. The Class Day exercises were held on the campus, 
Monday and were attended by a large number of the Alumni, 
Under-graduates and friends of the out-going class. The Junior 
Hop in the evening was also a great success, and was very largely 
attended. On Tuesday evening President Drown gave a farewell 
reception to the Senior class, which was thoroughly successful and 
greatly enjoyed by the ladies of the Bethlehems and commence- 
ment visitors, as well as by the under-graduates present. On 
Wednesday, the eighteenth, the University Day exercises were 
held in the chapel before a large assemblage of friends. All 
the orations were carefully prepared and finely delivered and the 
day closed one of the most interesting and pleasant commence- 
ment weeks ever seen at Lehigh. 

i6i 



Senior Banquet* 

Class of '90. 

Summit House, Reading, Pa., June i2Th, 1896, 

tToaste. 

Toastniaster — " Bob " Lara.my. 

Ninety-Six, "Jim "Given. 

Retrospect, " Joe " Thurston. 

The Faculty, " Jake " Pool. 

The Ladies, . . . . . . " Billy " Dickerman. 

Reunions, . . . ' . . . . " Dave " Wilson. 

Lacrosse, " Babe " Bartles. 

The Pope *" Busky " Graff. 

Reading, Pa., " Cully " Daboll. 

Committee. 

W. G. Whildin, Chairman. 
W. T. HuTCHiNs, C. C. W. Bauder, 

E. T. Belden, E. S. Cunningham. 

• Deceased. 

163 



ITbe Sopbomore Cremation of Calculus, 

CEHIGH has always been noted for the number of her old and 
time-honored customs, but in the last few years most of these 

have been relegated to the past; however, of those that re- 
main, the Cremation of Calculus by the Sophomore Class is the 
oldest, most novel, weird and interesting. This celebration is 
usually the opening of the festivities of University week and is 
looked upon as one of the social events of the college year. 

For twenty long weeks the Sophomores suffered the most 
direful agonies at the hands of Olney and Courtenay, so is it much 
wonder, then, that at the end of this time, when they have con- 
quered these arch-fiends, that they should take delight in giving 
vent to those cravings for revenge so deeply rooted in our ancestors 
but which have remained dormant from generation to generation ? 

The custom of a parade through the Bethlehems, one of the 
most pleasant features of the celebration, had been abandoned 
during the past few years, owing to a lack of funds, but was 
revived by the Class of Ninety-Eight. This parade has many 
advantages and disadvantages, but the former do, without ques- 
tion, greatly outweigh the latter, and in Ninety-Eight's celebration, 
it played a very conspicuous part. 

The campus was beautifully decorated with thousands of 
Japanese lanterns; and a delightful band added gayety to the 
performance that was witnessed by a large and fashionable 
audience. During the intermission of the promenade, the Sopho- 
mores tried and found guilty the most outrageous tormentors of 
their college course ; and in the presence of eight thousand 
spectators, burned in effigy Olney and Courtenay, while all joined 
in the celebration of the expiation of these arch-heretics. 

Thus we see that Ninety-Eight did all in her power for the 
continuence of this interesting celebration and it is hoped that 
succeeding classes will be successful in their efforts to perpetuate 
this old and time-honored custom. 

164 



Cremation of Calculus* 

Sopbomorc Class, Xcbiob ITlniversit^. 

June 13TH, 1896. 

Synopsis. 

CHIS world has seen many mysteries, but the greatest mystery 
of all was the strange conglomeration of matter, in the brains 
of the mathematical firm of Courtenay & Olney. An analysis 
of these brains, made by means of the brainioscope, showed the 
following: Hyperbolas, 18 per cent.; Parabolas, 21 per cent.; 
Ellipses, 22 per cent.; Partial Differential Coefficients, 11 per 
cent.; Formulas A, B, C and D, 11 percent.; Integration, 16.999 
per cent. ; Common Sense, o.ooi per cent. Total, 100 per cent. 

As little boys, they first saw light in the town of Minima, on 
the banks of the River Maxima. When mere babies they showed 
the tendency of their minds by constructing a hyperbolic parabo- 
loid across the Maxima. This structure still remains, and is 
pointed out to tourists with pride by the good people of Minima. 

When only eleven years old, they published a paper demon- 
strating the Laws of Gravity, suggested by a hill, slate pavements, 
and half an inch of ice. 

Six years later their respective works on Calculus were pub- 
lished by the firm of Sine, Cosine & Co. The same day the axis 
of the earth shifted 27.35° from its former position. How their 
works ever came to Lehigh is a mystery, whose equation is 

X-+ A}^dyJogs/— 3. 

History relates how the earth trembled and the vials of the 
Signal Service's wrath wxre poured out on that day, when the 
Lord High Mathematician announced to the terrified Sophomores 
that thereafter the works of these two would be the instruments 

166 



of torture throi;gout the department of mathematics. Three 
hours later 1 1^ of the class died. 

Mounted on bicycles (ponies being prohibted), Ninety- Eight 
began her lesson in the riding academy. Day after day the in- 
structions continued, and day after day we became better riders. 
It is true that many were thrown, especially those who tried to 
ride with a Conjugate Hyperbola saddle, or inflated their tires 
with an Asymptote. 

Many were thus badly injured, and others, weary with the 
strife, sat down to rest. Fatal mistake, thrice unfortunate blunder, 
for they could not mount again. Daily more and more took 
"headers, " until affairs came to such a pass that we found it nec- 
essary to use violent measures. 

A conspiracy was formed, the entire class joined, and plans 
for a trial of Courtenay and Olney were drawn up. To-night we 
will give them a fair chance to plead, but the evidence is so strong 
against them, and owing to the hatred of Ninety-Eight for them, 
we think their Cremation is assured. 

lproce66ion. 

At 7.30 P.M., the Procession, headed by His Satanic Majesty, 
will start from the Cave of Misery (Athletic Grounds), and pro- 
ceed through the Campus to New Street, by way of New Street 
to Church, to High, to Market, to New, to Broad, to Main, thence 
across the Old Bridge, to Fourth, to New, thence to the Judgment 
Seat. 

HDueical programme. 

Part ist. 
I. Stradella. 

2. Pilgrim's Chorus. Tamihaiiser. 
3. Kansas Two-Step. 

4. The Yacht Race. 

5. Hungarian Symphony. 

167 



©r&er of Bjerciscs. 

Scene — Hades. Judgment Throne of Satan. 

Bramatts ipcrsoiia:. 

Satan. 

Attendant I nips. 

Shade of Olney, Shade of Courtenay, 

Accuser of Olney, Accuser of Courtenay, 

Defender of Olney, Defender of Courtenay. 

ArriYal of the Spirits, Opening of Trial. 

Accusation of Olney and Courtenay, 

Defense, Sentence, 

Cremation. 

Part 2D. 
6. Cosmos. 

7. ]\IiLL IN the Forest. 
8. El Capitan. 

9. Magnolia Blossoms. 

10. Alma Mater Song. 

Committee. 

William B. Wood, CJiairnian. 

L. E. Edgar, H. M. Daggett, Jr., 

D. W. Roper, F. H. Gunsolus, L. S. Horner, 

J. B. Lindsey, Jr., T. B. Wood, Jr. 



168 



June 15, 1896. 
J- 

Baccalaureate Sermoix. 

Delivered by the Rev. William B. Bodine, D.D., of Phila- 
delphia, IN Packer' Memorial Church. 

J' 

Class 2)a\). 

Monday, June 16, 1896. 
J. 

program. 

ON THE CAMPUS. 

Music. 



Toast, 
Poem, 

Presentation Oration, 

Cup Contest, 
Prophecy, 
Memorial Oration, 

Ivy Oration, 
Tablet Oration, . 



Music. 



D. W. Bliem. 
W. S. Avars. 

M. W. Pool. 



Music. 

R. E. Laramy, President of Class. 

Music. 

S. M. Dessauer. 

. D. W. Wilson. 



Music. 



AT THE CHAPEL. 



. H. H. Beck. 
J. W. Thurston. 



Committee. 

B. M. McDonald, Chairman. 
F. R. Bartles, D. M. Bliem, G. R. Enscoe, J. R. Wilson. 



'96 Class poem. 



>IS said by those who've looked the matter up 
In classic, storied Greece's palmy days 
The greatest iuspiration to the bard, 

The theme of all his deepest, mightiest lays, 

Was ever some great hero; one perforce 
Who'd triumphed bravely o'er some worthy foe ; 

Who'd won his laurels in some stern affray, 
Some contest or of weal or woe. 

So would I sing to-day of victory — 

The glorious termination of a weighty fray ; 

Of Ninety-Six the victor, safely through. 

And fixed at last where none can say her nay. 

Yet, though the road seemed steep and hard to climb 
When viewed from far below the cloud-capped crest 

Still is it pleasant at the stage's end 
To pause, before the march is onward pressed. 

These times we've spent in quaint old Beth'lem town, 
Under the wings of Alma Mater — and the Dutch, 

Paying the one our fond allegiance, and again 
Paying the other every dollar they could touch. 

The difficulties that beset our path 

Now softened by the azure mist of years 

Are scarce perceived ; while still stand clearly forth 
Sweet memories, the plainer as the parting nears. 

Four years ! but still it seems but yesterday 
When first we trod upon this classic sward; 

Four years — of toil and pleasure mixed; 
But as the full, sonorous chord 

170 



Is all the deeper in its harmony 

For one sweet touch of pathos there entwined 

So fares it now with us; we would not if we could, 

Efface the memory of the sadder part 

Of these four years ; the memory of two 

Who are not here to-day; two noble souls 

Who left us, both within these last few weeks. 



But yet a few short days and '96 

Is but a name ; no more old Packer Hall 
Shall be our morning goal ; and ne'er again 

Shall terror thrill through every nerve at stentor call 
Of, "Fill the boards"! 

Another memory sad 

Will rankle long; who does not drop a tear 
And hang his head in shame at bitter thought 

At Lafayette's five vict'ries in one year ? 
But this is past, and future hopes are bright 

As well for Lehigh as for us who go away. 
Another year shall see the tables turned again, 

With interest, no doubt, we shall this debt repay. 

Our undergraduate days are past; we go 

To till in other fields, and take our stand 

In the broad battle-field of life as Lehigh's sons; 

But as we leave, we feel it deeper still, 

There is not one, around whose heart there shall not cling 

Still closer than the ivy to these rugged walls, 

Fond memories of these years of college life; 

And reverently we breathe our fervent college prayer — 

God save old Lehigh and the Class of '96! 

June 13, 1896. WILLIAM STEWART AYERS, M.E. 



171 






':;^', ^ 



.1 r- 

'I ^ 




Committee on Hrrauyements. 



Harry Sackett Johxsox, Chairman. 



Harry Layfield Bell, 
Stuart Rhett Elliott, 
Eugene P. Roundly, 
Erle Reiter Hannu-m, 



Arthur Perkins Jenks, 
Charles Francis Scott, 
Samuel Palmer Senior, 
Arthur Harold Serrell. 



Harrison Ricord Van Duyne. 



Mrs. Charles M. Dodson, 
Mrs, C. Minor Dodson, 
Mrs. T. M. Drown, 
Mrs. B. W. Frazier, 
Mrs. F. W. Leinbach, 



patronesses. 

Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 



R. P. Linderman, 
E. CoppEE Mitchell, 
W. B. Myers, 
W. A. Robinson, 
E. A. "Wilbur. 



IDlniversit^ 2)av- 



J* 

JEjercises. 

On June 17, 1S96. 

Reading of Scripture and Prayer 

By the Rev. Elwood Worcester, Ph.D., Chaplain of the University. 

MUSIC. 

Sa/ufaiorj' Orah'on—" Citizenship," . Robert Edward Laramy. 

Ora/'/tfw— "True Education." . . . Hobart Bentley Ayers. 

MUSIC. 

Oration — " America's Place in Mining Science," Edward Williamson Miller. 
6>r«//tf;?—" War and Civilization," . . . Henry Neff Herr. 

music. 
Oration — " Applications of Electrical Science," Charles Howard Morgan. 
Valedictory Oration, .... Warren Joshua Bieber. 

Award of the Wilbiir Scholarship to 
Harold John Horn, ...... South Bethlehem. 

First in Rank in the Sophomore Class. 

The Wilbur Prizes were awarded as follows : 

Freshman Class, Mathematics, to 

John Wesley Grace, Jr., ..... Goshen, N. J. 

Eugene Gifford Grace, ..... Goshen, N. J. 

Freshman Class, French, to 
G. Fred Allen, ...... Florida, N.Y. 

Freshman Class, German, to 
Arthur Warner Klein, ..... Bethlehem. 

Freshman Class, Themes, to 
Maurice Clark Benedict, ..... Altoona. 

Freshman Class, Rhetoric, to 
Charles Ford Carman, ..... Cedarville, N. J. 

Freshman Class, Freehand Drawing, to 
Russell Kimball, ...... New York City. 

Freshman Class, General Chetnistry, to 
George Reifsnyder Jackson, .... Scranton. 

174 



The following Degrees were conferred by Dr. Thomas Messinger Drown, 
LL.D. , President of the University: 

Ph.D. 
Herman Eugene Kiefer, A.C, M.S. 

E.M. 

Wtluam Henry Brown, B..S., Albert Beardsley Jessup, B.S., 

John Thomas Callaghan, Jr., B.S., Arthur Hughes Lewis, B.S., 
Howard EcKiELnT, B.S., Joseph Philips, Jr., B.S., 

Carlos Yglesias, B S. 

B.A. 

Warren Joshua Bieber, Robert Edward Laramy, 

Joseph Wharion Thurston. 

B.S. 
Howard Franklin Boyer. 



Albert Doane Ayres, 
Lewis Warrington Baldwin, 
Springfield Baldwin, 
Frederick Rawdon Bartles, 
Fairfax Bayard, 
Edgar Tweedy Belden, 
Moriz Bernstein, 
Daniel William Bliem, 
Edward Elisha Bratton, 
Frederic Allyn Daboll, 
Frank Oliver Dufour, 
Edward Miall Durham, Jr., 
George Ramsey Enscoe, 

Frank 



C.E. 

Henry Neff Herr, 
Robert Parsons Howell, 
Victor Witmer Kline, 
John Buckley MacBride, 
John Henry Myers, 
Walter Raleigh Okeson, 
Horace Lucius Palmer, 
Homer Austin Reid, 
George Homer Ruggles, 
Clement Clarence Rutter, 
John Cornelius Sesser, 
Luther D. Showalter, 
Ulysses Grant S. Walters, 
Thomas Weiler. 



William Stewart Ayars, 

HOBART BeNTLEY AYERS, 

Hasell Wilson Baldwin, 
Frank Shepard Bromer, 
George Amandus Buvinger, 
Eckley Samuel Cunningham, 
Sa.muel Philip Curtis, 
John William Dalman, 
William Carter Dickfrman, 
Edward Hiram Dutcher, Jr., 
Charles Victor Ferriday, 

Harry Dallam 



M.E. 

Thomas Joseph Gannon, 
William Heald Groverman, 
Howard Drysdale Hess, 
Caleb Wheeler Lord, 
Rafael de la Mora, 
Morris Wright Pool, 
James Lee Rankin, Jr., 
*Arthur Yeager Shepherd, 
Henry Shriver, Jr , 
Edward Stewart Taylor, 
Harry Conklin Tripp, 
Webster. 



♦Died June 5. having completed the work required for graduation. 



175 



George Pomeroy Bartholomew, 
William Alvin Evans, 
Victor Albert Johnson, 



B.S. 



John Scofield Wallace. 



Edward Williamson Miller, 
John Augustus Thomson, 
Edward Coppee Thurston, 



£.£. 



William James Adams, Jr., 
Arthur Davison Badgley, 
Francis Hoskins Baldwin, 
Charles Champlin Walker Bauder, 
Aaron Beaumont Carpenter, 
Malcolm Carrington, 
Frank Leslie Cooke, 
Timothy Sharpe Eden, 
Curtis Bertram Flory, 
Clarence Richard Fountain, 
James Brown Given, 
John Savage Graff, 



David Hall, 
William Steell Jackson, 
Bruce Emerson Loomis, 
Clifford Sherron MacCalla, 
Charles Howard Morgan, 
William Hitz Mussey, 
Franklin Oberly, 
Henry Paul Reed, 
William Bailey Taylor, 
Curtis Edwards Trafton, 
Job Roberts Wilson, 
Alfred Mahlon Worstall. 



Herbert Huebener Beck, 
Maximilian Joseph Bucher, 



A.C. 



Robert Edwin Kresge, 
Victor Emanuel Masson, 



Louis Atwell Olney. 



Samuel Moses Dessau er, 
Jacob Grafius Petrikin, 



B.S. 



Davis Sanno Williams, 
David William Wilson, Jr. 




176 




THURSDAY, OCTOBKR 8, 1896. 

Address, , . . "Citizenship and Techincal Education. 

Delivered by John H. Converse, of Philadelphia. 

Ifounber's 2)a^ Ibop. 

Committee. 

Charles F. Scott, '97, Chairman. 
Henry H. Seahrook, '97, Horatio F. Brown, '98, 



James F. Middledith, '99, 



Truman M. Dodson, 1900. 



Ipatroiicsses. 



Mrs. Charles M. Dodson, 
Mrs. Benjamin W. Frazier, 
Mrs. William B. Myers, 
Mrs. Robert P. Rathbun, 



Mrs. Thomas M. Drown, 
Mrs. E. Coppee Mitchell, 
Mrs. G. Reginald R. Radford, 
Mrs. Elisha P. Wilbur. 



177 



Junior ©ratodcal Contest. 

Class of '98, 

Monday Morning, Februray 22, I'Spy. 
10.30 o'clock. 

J- 

proorainme. 

processional hymn. 

PRAYER. 
NATIONAL HYMN. 

Oration — " The Political Duties of the College Graduate," 

Herbert Henninger Hess. 

Oration — " Labor Unions are a Benefit to the Workingman of the 

United States," . Frank Norman Kneas. 

Oration — " Labor Unions not a Benefit," Louis Cheston Starkey. 

HYMN AMERICA. 

Oration — "The Labor Union as the Future Educator of the 

American Masses," . David Hope Childs. 

Oration — " The Educational Test as a Check upon Immigration," 

Basil George Kodjbanoff. 

hymn washington. 

reading of the roll of honor of the senior class. 

decision of judges. 

First Prize, $25, . . . Louis Cheston Starkey 

Second Prize, $15, . . Basil George Kodjbanoff 

Third Prize, $10, .... David Hope Childs. 

doxology. 
benediction. 

JuDges. 

Mr. John D. Hoffman, '83, Mr. Albert G. Rau, '88, 

Mr. H. T. Morris, '91. 

'Clsbcrs, 

J. R. Farwell, F. H. Gunsolus, J. B. Lindsey, Jr., 

E. H. Symington, C. E. Webster, Jr., 

T. B. Wood. 

17S 



IRoll of Ibonor. 



OF THE 



Senior (Blaes. 



jt 



r. Walter Everette Brown, 

2. William Ragan Binkley, 

3. Ambrose Everett Yohn, 

4. Woodford Royce, 

5. Arthur Frost Loomis, . 

6. Carl Pivany Nachod, 

7. William Edward Underwood, 

8. Robert Collyer Noerr, 

9. Thaddeus Merriman, 

10. Wallace Treichler, 

11. Ralph Scofield Griswold, 

12. Gilbert Case White, 

13. Thomas Cedwyn Thomas, 

14. Charles Schwartze Bowers, 

15. Paul Beno Straub, 

16. John Peake Reynolds, Jr., 



Stamford, Conn. 

Hagerstown, Md. 

Saxton, Pa. 

Willimantic, Conn. 

Oneida, N. Y. 

Glenside, Pa. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Washington, D. C. 

South Bethlehem, Pa. 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Madison, N. J. 

Richmond, Va. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 

Charleston, S. C. 



179 



Hn nDetnoriam. 

1Ricbar^ Bllan HDarris, 

Class of '99, 
Died at Syracuse, N. Y., December 18, 1896. 

Jocicpb Ikibboo Siuis, B,nD„ 

Class of '86, 
Died at Colorado Springs, Col., October 15, 1S95. 

Ertbur IDeagcr Sbcpbert), HD.iE., 

Class of '96, 
Died at South Bethlehem, Pa., June 5, 1896. 

3obn Savacjc 6raff, iB,£,, 

Class of '96, 
Died at Bowman's Station, Pa., September 7, 1896. 



180 




Lehigh University, Incorporated by the Legislature of Pennsylvania in 1866 

Founder, A.sa Packer. 

Christmas Hall, First used as abuilding for recitations, chapel, and dormitories. 
Competition Scholarships, . . . Awarded from 1 866 to 1870. 



Foundation Scholarships, 

The First Literary Society, the Junto, 

Observatory, . . . Erected by R. H 

Packer Hall, ..... 

Tuition made free, and scholarships annulled. 

Chemical Society, 

Wilbur Scholarship and Engineering Society, 

Saucon Hall, .... 

Athletic Association, 

First Epitome, appeared in 1875, 

Libraiy, 

The Btcrr^ 

First Junior Oratorical Contest, 

Gymnasium, 

Chemical Laboratory, 

Wilbur Prize, 

Packer Memorial Church, 

Electrical Engineering Society, 

The Henry S. Haines Memorial Scholarship, 

Lacrosse Championship, 

The Lehigh (luarierly^ ... 

Free Tuition^ ..... 

Cane Rushes, .... 

Physical Laboratory, .... 

First Freshman-Sophomore Inter-Class Contest, 



From 1S67 to 1870. 

Established in 1868. 

Sayre, Esq., in 1S69. 

Completed in iS6g. 

. In 1871. 

Established in 1871. 

Established in 1872. 

Erected in 1873. 

Founded in 1874. 

Issued by Class of 1878. 

Erected in 1878. 

Established in 1881. 

1883. 

Opened in 1883. 

Completed in 1885. 

Established in 1887. 

Completed in 18S7. 

Established in 1B87. 

Established in 1889. 

1890. 

Founded in 1891. 

Abolished, September, 1892. 

Abolished in 1S92. 

Erected in i892-'93. 

i8q2. 



Supply Bureau, 
Lacrosse Championship, 
Brown and White ^ 
Honor System, 

Athletic Advisory Committee, 
Fraternity Night, . 
Students' Club Room, . 
Lacrosse Championship, . 
Lacrosse Championship, 
Week-day Chapel, . 
The Fornm, 



Ipl•C8i^cnts of tbc IHnivcrsit'? 



Henry Coppee, LL.D., 
John M. Leavitt, D.D., 
Robert A. Lamberton, LL.D., 
*Henky Coppee, LL.D., 
*WiLLiAM H Chandler, Ph.D., 
Thomas M. Drown, LL.D., . 



Established m 


1892 




1893. 


Established in 


1894. 


Adopted in 


1894. 


Organized in 


1894 


Established in 


1894. 


Opened in 


1895- 




1895. 




1896 


Abolished in 


1896 


Established in 


1S96. 


1865- 


1875. 


. 1875- 


1S80. 


1880- 


1893. 


. 1893- 


i8q5. 


1895- 


1895. 


. iSq5 





1869. 


M. Rock, 


tSyg 


WaleMctorians. 

R. H. Tucker, 


889 


J. Lockett, 


1870. 


W. R. Butler, 


1880 


T. H. Hardcastle, 


1890 


W. V. Gulp, 


1871. 


W. H. McCarthy, 


t88i 


L. Stockton, 


[891 


W. Forstall, 


1872. 


G. P. Bland, 


1882 


C. C. Hopkins, 


[892 


W. R. Davis, 


1873. 


W. M. Scudder, 


18S3 


A. E. Forstall, 


[893 


R. C. H. Heck, 


1874. 


W. D. Hartshorne, 


1884 


A. P. Smith, 


[894 


I. L. Neufeld, 


1875. 


E. H. Williams, Jr., 


1885 


I. A. Hcikes, 


1895 


W. Ferris. 


1876. 


C. L. Taylor, 


1886 


S. J Harwi, 


[896 


W. J. Bieber. 


1877. 


G. M. Heller, 


188- 


M. B. Fehnel, 


897 


W. E. Brown. 


1878. 


R. H. Reed, 


i888 


S. W. Frescoln, 
Salutatorians. 






i86g. 


J. M. Thome, 


879 


J. K. Paddock, 


889 


S. E. Berger, 


1870. 


W. G. Clapp, 


880 


H'. P. Spalding, 


8go 


H. A. Peering, 


1871. 


F. L. Clerc, 


881 


H. F. Haldeman, 


891 


W. S. Topping, 


1872. 


F. R. C. Degenhart, 


882 


E. H. Lawall, j 


892 


W. N. R. Ashmead 


1873. 


R. B. Cla.vuin, 


883 


P. A. Lambert, 


893 


H. B. Evans, 


1874. 


H. C. Wilson, 


884 


L. B. Sample, 


894 


R. B. Brown, 


1875. 


E. W. Sturdevant, 


885 


W. H. Cooke, 


895 


W. B. Keira, 


1876. 


R. W. Mahon, 


886 


H. Toulmin, 


896 


R. E. Laramy, 


1877. 


].. T. Wolle, 


887 


H. H. Stoek, 


897 


W. R. Binkley. 


1878. 


H. F. [. Porter, 


888 


A. G. Rau, 







Xaiilbur Scbolars. 



1874. 


W. D. Hartshorne, 


882. 


C. C. Hopkins, 


iSji. 


W. Forstall, 


1875. 


A. E. Meaker, 


883. 


P. A. Lambert, 


1892. 


A. E. Lister, 


1876. 


C. L. Taylor, 


8S4. 


L. B. Semple, 


1893. 


H. B. Evans, 


1877. 


H. S. racoby, 


885. 


W. H. Cooke, 


1894. 


]. L. Neufeld, 


1878. 


L. J. Barr, 


886. 


J. K. Surls. 


1S95. 


W. B. Keim, 


1879. 


R. H. Tucker, 


887. 


H. S. Fisher, 


1896. 


W. I. Bieber, 


1880. 


M. M. Duncan, 


888. 


S. W. Frescoln, 


1897. 


W. E. Brown, 


I88I. 


A. P. Crilly, 


889. 
890. 


J. Lockett. 

A. H. VanCleve, 


1898. 


H. J. Horn. 



* Acting President. 



182 



i893. 



1897. 



First. 

A. P. Smith, 
H. L. Bowman, 
C. A. Luckenbach, 
G. T. Richards, 
A. G. Rau, 
W. D. Farwell, 
H. A. Foering, 
E. Dodge, 
S. B. Knox, 
W. C. Anderson, 
Wm. Warr, 
H. N. Herr, 
L. C. Starkey. 



junior ©ratorical Contests. 
Second. 

H. H. HiUegass, 
J. H. Wells, 
W. P. Taylor, 
H. S. Fisher, 
G. R. Baldwin, 
P. Atkinson, 
R. K. Neumeyer, 
H. W. Dubois, 
J. C. Ballou, 
R. C. Warriner, 

A. S. Clift. 
H. A. Reid, 

B. G. Kodjbanoff. 



Third 



K. B. Wiseman, 
J. T. Morrow, 
E. J. Prmdle, 
W. R. Davis, 

E. C. Reynolds, 
R. Ferriday, 

F. A. McKenzie, 
F. A. Daboll. 
D. H. Childs. 



Ipresi&ents of tbc Hlumni Bssociation. 



1876- 


77. 


C. 


E. Donaldson, 


1877- 


78. 


c. 


E. Donaldson, 


1878- 


79- 


W 


. R. Butler, 


1879- 


8u. 


H 


S. Drinker, 


1880- 


►■I. 


C. 


W. Haines, 


I88I- 


82. 


C. 


1 .. Taylor, 


1882- 


83. 


R. 


W. Mahon, 



85. 



H. F. J. Porter, 
E. H. Wilhanis, Jr., 
E. H. Williams, Jr., 
W. M. Scudder, 
W. M. Scudder, 
Chas. Bull, 
Chas. Bull, 



1895- 



'qi. 


G. 


A. 


Jenkins, 


'92. 


R. 


P. 


Lindernian„ 


'93. 


W 


H 


. Baker, 


'94. 


T. 


M 


Eynon, 


"95- 


F. 


P. 


Howe, 


-■96. 


H 


B 


Reed, 


-'97. 


L. 


0. 


Emmerich. 



prcsibents of tbe Engineering Society. 



l872-'73. 
i873-'74. 
1874-75. 
i875-'76. 
i876-'77 
i88i-"82. 
i882-'83. 



R. Fj. Ca.xton, '73, 
A. A. Herr, '74, 
A. E. Weaker, '75. 
E. H. Williams, Jr., '; 
L. T. Wolle '77, 
L. O. Emmerich, '82, 
N. O. Goldsmith, '83, 



1884- 


85. 


F. 


B. 


Petersen, '85, 


1891- 


92 


1885- 


86. 


H 


G 


Reist, '86, 


1892- 


93 


1886- 


87. 


J. 


W 


LaDoo, '87, 


1893- 


94 


1887- 


88. 


G 


H 


Davis. '88, 


1894- 


95 


1888- 


89. 


J. 


R. 


Villalon, '89, 


1895- 


96 


1889- 


90. 


T 


C. 


J. Bailey, '90, 


1896- 


97 


1890- 


91. 


C. 


E. 


Coxe, '90, 







F. A. Coleman, '92, 
C. L. McKenzie, '93, 
W. H. Kavanaugh, '94,, 
W. B. Keim, '95, 
E. S. Cunningham, '96, 
T. Merriman, '97. 



ffiresifecnts of tbe Btblctic Bssociation. 



i884-'85. 


C. Whitehead. '85, i 


i885-'86. 


C. E. Clapp, '86, I 


i886-"87. 


R. K. Polk, '87, I 


i887-'88. 


G. H. Davis, '88.* i 


i887-'88. 


W. Bradford, '88, i 



Since the Reorganization. 

888-'89. G. Ayres, '89, 

889-' go. F. R. Coates, '90, 

8go-'9i. J. De La K. Barrios, '91,* 

Sgo-'gi. P. B. Winfree, '91, 

89i-'92. L. W. Walker. '92, 



893 



C. W. Gearhart, '93, 
K. D. Floyd, '94, 
N. P. Massey,''95, 
J. W. Thurston, '96,. 
G. L. Yates, '97. 



J. McK. Graeff, '85, 
C. A. Junken, '85, 
H. H. Bowman, "85, 
B. A. Cunningham, '87, 
B. A. Cunningham, '87, 
H. H. McClintic, '89, 



36aseball Captains. 

88g. W. Butterworth, '89,* 

889. C. Walker, '89, 

890. H. W. Biggs, '91, 
Sgi. E. O. Robinson, '91,* 

891. C W. Throckmorton, '92, 

892. B. E. Woodcock, '92, 



893. 



897. 



C. W. Gearhart, '92, 
J. G. Petnkin, '95, 
C. H. Thompson, '94, 
S. P. Senior, '97, 
J. W. Gannon, '98,* 
C. F. Carman, '99. 



J. S. Robeson, '86, 
H. W. Frauenthal, '8 
W. R. Pierce, '87, 
W. Bradford, 'SS, 
C. W. Corbin, '89. 

♦Resigned. 



jFootball Captains. 

888. C. Walker, '89, 

889. S. D. Warriner, 'go, 

890. D. Emory, '91, 

891. W. W. Blunt, '92. 

892. M. McClung, Jr., '93, 

893. M. McClung, jr., '93, 



183 



G. Ordway, '94, 
C. E. Trafton, '96. 
C. E. Trafton, '96, 
F. H. Gunsolus, '98 
F. H. Gunsolus, '98 



i886. C. P. Coleman, '86, 
i887-i8<)o. A. K. Reese, '8i 
i8qi. H. C. Banks, '92, 



lacrosse Captains. 

1892. C. 1. Mosman, "92, 

1893. T. H. Symington, '93, 

1894. G. (Jrdway, '94, 



1895. J. C. Dick, '95, 

1896. F. Bartles, '96, 

1897. T, Merriman, '97. 



'78. 
H. F. I. Porter, 
i\l. P. Paret, 
F. P. Howe. 

'79- 
M. M. Duncan, 
J. H. Paddock, 
H. R. Linderman, Jr. 

•80. 
F. P. Spalding, 
\V. H. Bradbury, 
F. C.Wooten. 

'81. 

B. F. Halderaan, 

F. S. Pliillips, 
R. S. Lee, Jr. 

'82. 

C. C. Hopkins, 
J. D. Ruff, 

J. W. Reno. 

'83. 
W. Briggs, 
R. R. Peale, 

G. Leighton, 

N. O. Goldsmith, 
W. T. Wilson. 
•84. 
A. P. Smith, 
S. D. Morford, 
R. P. Linderman, 
H. P. Douglass, 
J. A. Watson. 

'85. 
C. M. Tolman, 
H. W. Rowley, 
1 . W. Eirney, 
W. H. Cooke, 
C. F. Zimmele, 
G. W. Snyder, Jr. 

'86. 
C. E. Clapp, 
J. K. Surls, 
S C. Hazleton, 
M. A. DeW. Howe, Jr. 
R. H. Da%'is, 
W. H. Dean, 
W. P. Taylor, 
R. S. Breinig. 

A rtist. 
H. A. Luckenbach, 
Year of 1885.* 

H. B. Douglas, '84. 
G. H. Cobb, '86, 
W. H. Cooke, '85, 
R. H. Wilbur, 85, 



Epitome 
H. L. Bowman, '85, 
G. W. Petiinos, '87, 
M.A.DeW.Howe,Jr.'86, 
H. S. Fishei, "87. 
A rtists. 
H. W. Rowley, '85, 
K. F'razier, '87, 
L. A. Round, "83, 
G. L. Lara, '86. 

'87. 
Editor-in-Ch ie/. 
G. T. Richards. 

Bust)! ess Manager. 
C. F. Zimmele. 
H. S. Fisher, 
W. A.McFarland, 
H. H. Stock, 
F. S. Smith, 
L. B. Stillwell. 

A rtists. 
K. Frazier, 
J, A, Morrow, 
H. A. J. Wilkens. 
'38. 
Editor-iu-Chief. 
L. R. Zollinger. 

Business Manager, 
A. G. Rau. 
C. N. Butler, 
H. S. Miner, 
W. H. Stokes, 
E. H. Shipman, 
W. A. Stevenson. 

A rtists. 
C. L. Addison, 
W. ^L Webb, 
J. B. Glover. 



Editor-i n-Chie/, 
W. D. Farwell. 

Business Manager. 
A. Johnson, 
A. T. Throop, 
W. Bulterworth, 
C. H. Deans, 
C. Walker. 

A rtists. 
H. M.Carson, 
I. Lockett, 
"W. E. Howe, 
L. A. Round. 
'90. 
Editor-in-Ch ie/. 
C. H. Miller. 

Business Manager. 
R. S. Mercur. 



3E^itors. 

T. T. C. Bailey, Jr., 
W.V. Kulp. 
W. C. Riddick, 
F. Clarke, Jr. 

A rtists. 
F. K. Houston, 
W. A. Stevenson. 



Editor-in-Ch ie/, 
H. T. Morris. 

Business Manager. 
G. S. Hayes. 
P. ^L Paine, 
F. C. Lauderburn, 
H. W. Myrick. 
J. Z. Miller, 
R. R. Hillman, 
J. R. Barrios, 
E. H. Coxe, 
M. D. SohoD. 
'92. 
Editor-in-Ch ie/. 
W. W. Blunt. 

Business Matiager, 
R. J. Snyder. 

E. Dodge. 
P. H. Smith, 

J. Y. Bassell, Jr., 
C. M Case, 
H. W. DuBois, 
R. R. Kitchell, 
H. Orth. Jr., 
C. K. Shelbv, 
L. W. Walker. 

'93- 
Editor-i n-Chie/. 
C. H. Durfee. 

Business Manager, 

F. P. Fuller. 

R. C. H. Heck, 
H. R. Blickle, 
C. W. (learhart, 
S. B. Knox, 
H. D. McCaskey, 
C.J. O'Neill, 
N. M. Osborne, 
C. W. Parkhurst. 

'94. 
Editor-i n-Chie/. 
A. Weymouth. 

Business Manager. 
W. C. .Anderson. 

E. A. Grissinger, 
T. J. Bray, Jr., 
J. L. Burley, 



M. L. Cooke, 
T. P. Elmore, 
T. G. Empie, 
C O. Luckenbach, 
G. Ordway. 

'95- 
Editor-in-Chie/. 
F. Baker. Jr. 

Business .Manager. 
C. H. Yansant. 
A. S. Clift, 
J. J. Gibson, 
AY. H. Groverman, 
C. F. Maurice, 
B M McDonald, 
J. L. Poultney, 
C. F. Townsend, 
Wm. Warr. 



Editor-in - Ch ie/. 
W. S. Ayars. 

Business .Manager, 
J. B. Given. 

H. B. Ayers, 

C. W. Lord, 
F. A. Daboll, 

D. S. Williams, 

D. W. Wilson, Jr., 
J. W. Thurston, 
W. C. Dickcrman, 
R. E. Laramy. 

'97- 
Editor-in-Chie/, 

E. R. Hannum. 
Business Manager. 

C. W. Thorn. 

F. D. Ammen, 
John Boyt, 
H. T. Irwin, 

B. O. Curtis, 

C. S. Boweis, 
C. (;. Dunneils, 
A. L. Saltzman, 
W. S. Hiester. 



Edit 07-i n-Chie/. 
J. B. Lindsey, Jr. 

Business Manager. 
H. M. Daggett, Jr. 

D. W. Roper, 

C. E. Webster, Jr., 

E. H. Symington, 
W. C. Hare, 

W H. (lunsolus, 
I. R. Farwell, 

D. F. Castilla, 

E. D. HiUman. 



* Issued by the whole University. 



36iirr EMtors. 



Monthly. 



1881-1882. 
Editor-in- Chii'f. 
C. C. Hopkins, '82. 

Business Manager. 
N. O. Goldsmith, "'83. 
J. D, Ruff, '82, 
S. U. Morford, '84, 
H. B. Douijlas, '84, 
R. R. Peale, '83, 
A. P. Smith, "84. 
1882-1883. 

Managing Editor. 
N. O. Goldsmith, '83. 

Business Manager. 
J. A. Watson, '84. 
F. H. Purnell. "83, 
H. A. Butler, '82, 
A. P. Smith, '85. 
H. B. Douglas, '84, 
R. H. Davis, '86, 
C. M. Tolman, '85, 

F. W. B. Pile, '85. 

1883-1884. 
Managing Editor. 
A. P. Smith, '84. 

Business Manager. 
R. H. Wilbur, '85. 
H. B. Douglas, '84, 
R. H. Davis, "86, 
M. DeW. Howe. Jr., '8 
J. A. Watson, '84. 
C. O. Haines, "84, 
W. H. Cooke, -85, 
I. A. Heikes, '85. 
Wm. Wirt Mills. '87. 
1884-1885. 

Jt/anagin^ Editor. 
W. H. Cooke, '85. 

Business Manager. 
C. E Clapp, '86. 

G. W. Snyder, Jr., '86, 
R. H. Davis, '86, 

M. DeW. Howe, Jr., '8( 
Wm. Wirt Mills, '87. 
1885-1886. 

Managing Eaitor. 
M. DeW. Howe, Jr., '81 

Business Manager. 
Wm. Wirt Mills, '87. 
C. E. Clapp, '86. 
W. H. Stokes, '88, 



Business Manager. 
A. S. Ross. '86. 
I. A. Heikes, '85, 
H. G. Reist, '86, 



K. Frazier. '87, 
G. M. Richardson, '86, 
R. McA. Loyd, Elec. 
1886-1887. 

Managing Editor. 
F. S. Smith, 87. 

Business Manager. 
C. P. Coleman, '86. 
A. Doolittle, '87, 
H. S. Fisher, '87, 
K. Frazier, '87, 
W. H. Stokes, '88, 
W. E. Howe, '8q, 
H. M. Carson, '89, 
W. D. Farwell, "89. 

1887-1888. 
Managing Editor. 
W. H. Stokes, '88. 

Business Managers. 
L. P. C'laston, '88, 
C. Walker, '8q. 
M. V 
W. D 
H. L. 
W. E 
W. A 
C. E. 
H. S. 
J. W. 
C. H. 
A.M. 
H. M 
T. C. 



Domenech, '88, 
. Farwell, '8g, 

Mcllvain, "88, 
. Howe, '89, 
. Stevenson, '88, 

Coxe, '90. 

Miner, '88, 

Stone, Jr., 'go, 

Boynton. '89, 
, Masser, '90, 
. Carson, '89, 
J. Bailey, Jr., '90. 



Managing Editor. 
W. D. Farwell, '89. 

Business Manager, 
C. Walker, '89. 
S. E. Berger, '89, 
C. E. Coxe, '90. 
A. T. Throop, '89, 
H. M. Carson, '8g, 
(i. E. Lefevre, '91, 
T. C. J. Bailey, Jr., '90. 
F. C. Lauderburn, 'gi, 
A. E. Phillips, 'go, 
C. H. Boynton, '8g, 
J. S. Riegel, '90. 
1889-1890. 
Editor-in-Ch ief. 
A. E. Phillips, '90. 

Business Managers. 
C. H. Miller, 'gi. 



E. Vander Horst, 'gi. 
J. S. Riegel, '90, 
E. I. Prindle, 'go, 
W. Forstall, 'gi, 
C. McK. Leoser, Jr., '91, 
P. S. Camp, '92, 
C. W. Meade, '92. 
1890-1891. 
Editor-in-Cli ie/. 
W. Forstall, '91. 

Business Managers, 
E. Vander Horst, '9?, 
G. P. Case, '92. 
A. E. Jesbup, '92, 
C. W. Meade, '92, 
S B. Knox, 'g3. 
i8gi-i8g2. 
Editor-in-Chie/. 
A. E. Jessup, ■g2. 

Business Manager. 

E. Dodge, '92. 
G. P. Case, '92, 

R. R. Kitchell, '92, 
S. B. Knox, '93, 
H. D. McCaskey, '93, 
G. H. Frost, '93, 
M. I,. Cooke, '94. 
A. Weymouth, '94. 
1892-1893. 
Editor-in- C/i icy. 
H. D. McCaskey, '93,* 
S. B. Knox, '93. 

Business Manager. 
C. H. Durfee, '93. 
G. H. Frost, '93, 
H. D. McCaskey, '93, 
C. W. Parkhurst, '93, 
T. J. Bray, '94, 
M. L. Cooke, '94, 
A. Weymouth, '94, 

F. Baker, Jr., '95, 
J. J. Gibson, '95. 

1893-1894. 
Edito r-in-Cli ief. 
T.J Bray, '94. 

Business !\Ianager, 
W. J. Douglas, '96. 
.Assistant 
Business Manager, 
E. C. Ferriday, "95 



Resigned. 



3E^itor8 of tbc Enginccrinij Journal. 

B. A. Cunningham, '87. B. A. Cunningham, '87, 

1886-1887. L. R. Zollinger. '88. 
Business Manager. 1887-1888. 

C. C. Jones, '87. Corresponding 'Editor. 
E. Stackhouse, B. .M. '86, H. S. Jacoby, '87. 



185 



H. Schneider, 'g4, 

A. Weymou h, '94, 

F. Baker, Jr.. '95, 

R. E. Chetwood, jr., '95, 

I. J. Gibson, '95, 

"F. A. DaboU, '96, 

C. W. Lord, '96. 



Editor-in-Chief. 
J. J. Gibson, '95. 

Business .Manager. 
H. W. Baldwin, '96. 
F. Baker, Jr., '95, 
F. A. Daboll, '96, 
R E. Chetwood, Jr., '95, 
C. W. Lord, '96, 
W. C. Dickerinan, 'g6, 

E. R. Hannum, '97. 

1895-1896. 
Edito r-in- Ch ief. 
W. C. Dickerman, 96. 
Business Manager. 
H. W. Baldwin. '96,* 
J. R. Wilson, '96. 
Assistant 
Business .Manager. 

C. F. Scott, '97. 

F. A. Daboll, '96, 

E. R. Hannum, '97, 
H. H. Beck, '90, 

A. AL Worstall, '96, 
H. L. Bell. '97, 
H. T. Irwin, '97, 

D. S. Williams, 'g6. 

1896-1897. 

Edito r-in- Ch ief. 
H. L. Bell, '97,* 

F. D. Ammen, 'g7. 
Business Ma n age r, 

C F. Scott. '97.* 

C. S. Bcwers, '97. 

A ssista nt 

Business Ma t/ager, 

H. F. Brown, '98. 

H. T. Irwin, '97, 
A. L. Saltzman, '97, 
H. L. Adams. '98, 
J. B. Lindsey, '98. 
W. G. Hare, '98, 
W. B. Wood, "98, 
J. R Pettit, '99. 



Business Manager. 
L. R. Zollinger, "88. 
J. B. Glover, '88, 
A. T. Throop, '89. 



Editor-in-Chief. 
H. S. Jacoby, '87. 

Business Manager. 
C. H. Deans, '89. 



1891. 
Business Managers. 
H. K. Landis, 'go, 
H. H. Davis. '94. 
G. S. Hayes, 'gi, 
F. C. E. Landerburn, '91 
H. T. Morris, '91, 
P. M. Paine, 'gi. 
1891-1892. 
Chairman. 
J. V. Bassell. Jr., '92 



G. F. Duck, '88, 
P. Atkinson, '89, 
W. V. Kulp, 'go, 
A. T. Throop. 'SB. 



Editor-in- Ch ief. 
J S. Riegel, 'go. 

Business Manager, 
C, E. P'ink, '90. 



EMtors of tbc Xcbigb Quarterly. 



Business Managers. 
H. H. Davis. '92, 
C. W. Gearhart, g3. 

F. A. Coleman, '92, 
C. K. Shelby, '92, 
L. W. Walker, '92, 
P. H. Smith, '92. 



Chairman. 
R. C. H. Heck, '93. 



Business Managers. 
C. \V. Gearhart, '93, 

F. D. Hallock, 'g4. 
N. C. Banks, '93, 

G. E. Chamberlain, '93, 
R. W. Heard, '93, 

E. C. Reynolds, '93, 
A. B. Sharpe, '93, 
T. Jt. Symington, '93. 



H. S. Jacoby, '87, 
L. Breckenridge, Ph.B. 
H. Kemmerlin, '81, 
A. E. Phillips, 'go. 



Chairman. 
B. H. Jones. 

Business Managers. 
F. D. Paddock, 
J. E. Brooks. 

J. L. Burley, 
E. A. Grissinger, 
W. S. Maharg. 
W. V. Pettit, 
E. G. Rust. 



EMtors Of JBrown an^ TULIbitc. 



Edito r- in - Ch ief. 
W. C. Anderson, 'g4.+ 
W. S. Merrill. '94. 

Business Manager. 
E. A. Grissinger, '94. 

Assistant 
Business Manager. 



1S94-1805. 
Editor-in- Ch ief. 
Wra. Warr, 'g5. 

Business Manager. 
D. H. Kautz, '95, 

Assistant 
Business Manager. 



J. W. Thurston, '96. J. W. Thurston, '96. 



W. C. Anderson, "94, 
J. L. Burley, '94, 
T. P. Elmore, '94, 
A. L. Ware, '94, 
A. B. Jessup, '95, 

D. H. Kautz, "95, 
C. F. Maurice, "95, 

E. A. McKenzie, '95, 
Wm. Warr, '95, 

W. S. Ayars, "96, 
R. E. Laramy, '96, 
M. W. Pool, '96. 



F. A. McKenzie, '65, 
C. F. Maurice, '95, 
C. T. Ayres, '95, 

H. DeHuiT, '95, 
W. S. Ayars, '96, 
S. M. Dessauer '96, 
R. E. Laramy, '96, 
M. W. Pool, '96, 

B. O. Curtis, '97, 
L. Diven, '97, 

G. H. Sharrer, '97, 

C. W. Thorn, '97. 



Editor-in- Ch ief. 
M. W. Pool. '96,+ 
J. W. Thurston, 'g6. 

Business Manager. 
J. B. Given, '96. 

Assistant 
Business Manager. 

C. W. Thorn, '97. 

W. S. Ayars, '96, 
S. M. Dessauer, '96, 
David Hall, '96. 

D. W. Wilson. Jr., '96, 
John Boyt, '97, 

B. O. Curtis, '97, 
J. L. Sheppard, Jr., '97, 
W. E. Underwood, '97, 
G. H. Chasmar, '98, 
H. M. Daggett, Jr., '98, 
G. D. Heisey, '98. 



1896-1897. 
Edito r-in - Ch ief. 

B. O. Curtis. '97,+ 
John Boyt, '97. 

Business Manager. 

C. W. Thorn, '97,+ 
Wra. E. Underwood, 'g7. 

Assistant 
Business Manager. 
H. M. Daggett, Jr., 'g8-+ 
R. G. Griswold, 'g7, 
J. L. Sheppard, Jr., '97, 
Wallace Treichler, '97, 
T. R. Farwell, '98, 
G. D. Heisey, '98, 
Harold J. Horn. 'g8, 
J. B. Lindsey, Jr., '98, 
Lawrence Wooden, '98, 
C. S. Padgett. '99, 
L. T. Rainey, '99, 
T. C. Visscher, '99, 
J. Burr Reddig, 'gg. 



* Publication suspended. 
+ Resigned. 





DR. PAUL J. DASHIEI.L. 

PAUL J. DASHIELL was born July i6, 1867, at Annapolis, 
Md. He was a student at the Johns Hopkins University 
six years, receiving the degrees of A.M. and Ph.D. from that 
institution. Dr. Dashiell was an instructor in Organic Chemistry 
at Lehigh for two years, and during the last four years has held 
the Professorship of Chemistry at the Naval Academy. 

Dr. Dashiell played on both the Eighty- Nine baseball and 
football teams at Lehigh. The Football Guide for 1894, in 
giving a short history of Dr. Dashiell, says: " His team at Lehigh 
in 1889 was a remarkable one, inaking in the neighborhood of 
three hundred points against their opponents seventy-seven, scoring 
on the Princeton team of that year and defeating Pennsylvania in 
one of the two games played." 

Dr. Dashiell is recognized everywhere as an authority in foot- 
ball, having been a member of the Rules Committee. He has 
also officiated many times in the past few years in the big games, 
and is noted as being a perfectly fearless and impartial official. 




MATTHEW MC CLUNG. 



mATTHEW McCLUNG was born December ist, 1868, at 
Knoxville, Tenn. He entered Lehigh, and received the 
degree of B.S. in 1894. 

Mr. McClung played on the '90, '91, '92 and '93 baseball and 
football teams, and was also Captain of the Eleven in '92. 
" Divy," as he is popularly known at Lehigh, was one of the very 
best football players Lehigh has ever developed. His position 
was at quarter, and he filled that position in a manner that ranked 
him easily as one of the best quarter-backs in the country. Mc- 
Clung could and still can raise more spirit and enthusiasm in 
Lehigh teams than any player we have ever had, and the college 
will ever remember him as one who has done much to advance her 
athletic interests. In the last two years his services have been 
sought as an official in some of the most important games of the 
season, these demonstrating that his ability is highly appreciated 
abroad as well as at home. 



Htbletics* 



OUR cut for Athletics presents a figure that we feel sure needs 
no introduction to any one here at Lehigh. Who has not 
heard of " Chimmie," the mascot of our diiTerent teams ? A 
more earnest or enthusiastic "rooter" no college team has ever 
had; no matter how disagreeable the weather may be, "Chimmie," 
enveloped in half-a-dozen sweaters, with a foot ball under his arm 
and " Specker" at his heels, is always present on the side lines, 
causing general amusement by his antics. 

Last year's Lacrosse season was very successful in every 
sense of the word. Several new teams were put in the field by 
other colleges, and a more general interest was shown in the 
game. Har\'ard was represented by a team that Lehigh defeated 
by the score of four to one. We easily defeated the team from 
Johns Hopkins University; and finally, by our close and exciting 
victory over Stephens, won the Inter-collegiate Championship of 
the United States. Our last game was played with Toronto; and, 
although, Lehigh's team work was nearly perfect, we were, never- 
theless, defeated by the older and more experienced team from 
Canada. Caspar Whitney, in commenting on the Toronto game, 
said: "It was entirely becoming Lehigh should represent this 
country in Lacrosse, for none has played the game longer or so 
well." Much credit is due Captain Bartles for the brilliant show- 
ing his team made. 

The Baseball Nine had many difficulties to contend with at the 
beginning of the season. Captain Senior, on account of the many 
vacant places on the Nine, had practically to pick a new team out 
of the material on hand. We were especially weak in pitchers, 
and the results of the games during the first part of the season 
were very discouraging to all supporters of the team. Two years 
ago Lehigh won the series of three games from Lafayette, and last 
year Lafayette returned the compliment by defeating us in all 
three games; the last game, however, was very close, and showed 
that our nine had greatly improved during the season. Our timely 
victory over Virginia restored general confidence in the team; and 
we wound up the season by defeating the University of Pennsyl- 
vania in a close and exciting game played at Philadelphia. AH 
but two men of last year's nine are back this year and all look for- 
ward to a successful season. 

And now we come to football, the game that receives the most 

190 



attention at Lehigh as well as at most other American Colleges. 
The call for candidates last fall brought out only five 'Varsity- 
players of the previous team, and not much new material from 
which to select the eleven. Our team had games with several of 
the strongest elevens in the country, and we had few games on the 
home grounds where the team could have the College to cheer 
them on to victory. Notwithstanding these difficulties, the eleven 
played a good hard game of football, and, though the season was 
not as successful as usual, the team deserves the gratitude of the 
College for its hard, earnest work. We all wish Captain Gun- 
solus every success with his team next fall. 

Our relations with Lafayette were severed early in the season by 
a dispute that arose over the eligibility of one of their football 
players. Lehigh was fully sustained in her position by Caspar 
Whitney. That authority on amateur sport said : " In my judg- 
ment, based on the evidence before me, Lehigh was fully justified 
in protesting Barclay, and of subsequently cancelling the game 
with Lafayette, when the latter insisted on playing him." 

Tennis is receiving more attention this Spring than heretofore; 
and we hope soon to see so much interest shown in this fine game, 
that we will be able to send good players to the College Tourna- 
ments. 

Track Athletics have never received the attention at Lehigh that 
they deserve. We undoubtedly have plenty of material to form a 
team, but the poor condition of the track accounts for the lack of 
interest in this branch of Athletics. We are happy to be able to 
state, however, that the plans for the improvement of the baseball 
diamond, and football field, and putting in a good cinder track, 
are soon to mature into definite action. The Alumni generovisly 
offered to duplicate any sum that the students might raise for the 
renovation of the field. Although the total sum needed for the 
complete improvements including new grand stand and bleachers, 
has not yet been raised, over one-half is in the hands of the Ath- 
letic Committee, and the day is doubtless not far distant w^hen 
Lehigh will have first-class fields and tracks for her teams. 



^Qt. 



191 








CAPTAIN GUNSOLUS. 



CAPTAIN BARTI.ES. 




CAP IAIN SENIOR. 



Xebiob lanivevsit^ Etbletic 
Hssociation. 



©tftcere. 



Geo. L. Yates, '97, 

G. B. LiXDERMAN, '87, 

John Boyt, '97, 



President. 
Treasurer. 
Secretary. 



Committee. 



Dr. W. H. Chandler, 
Prof. W. A. Robinson. 
Prof. E. H. Williams, 

F. P. Howe, '78, 
R. H. Wilbur, '85, 

G. B. Linderman, '87. 



A. Johnston, '89, 
G. L. Yates, '97, 
John Boyt, '97, 
L. S. Horner, '98, 
R. R. HoRNOR, '99, 
W. White, 1900. 



Bjecutive Committee. 

R. H. Wilbur, '85, Chairman. 
Prof. W. A. Robinson, L. S. Horner, '98, G. L. Yates, '97, 

A. Johnston, '89. 



193 



ILebiob XTlniversit^ Zvnch Xteam, 



i895-'96. 



• Mr. C. W. Smith, Manaj^er. 

V. W. Kline, '96, Captain. 

S. J. Gass, '98, B. E. LooMis, '96, 



G. L. Yates, 97, 



R. R. HORNOR, '99. 



"Best XebUib IRecorDs. 



Event. 

40 Yards Dash, 
100 Yards Dash, 
220 Yards Dash, 
440 Yards Dash, 
One-Half Mile Run, 
One-Mile Run, 
One-Half Mile Walk, 
One-Mile Walk, 
Two-Mile Walk, 
Three-Mile Walk, 
120 Yards Hurdle, 
220 Yards Hurdle, 
Standing High Jump, 
Standing Broad Jump, 
Running High Jump, 
Running Broad Jump, 
Throwing Hammer, 
Putting Shot (16 lbs.), 
Pole Vault, 
Running High Kick, 
Fence Vault, 



Hohier. 
H. H. GODSHALL, '93, 

M. M. Duncan, '80, 
M. M. Duncan, '80, 

E. O. Warner, '94, 
H. Toulmin, '86, 
C. H. Miller, '88, 

F. R. Coates, '90, 

F. R. Coates, '90, 
L. O. Emmerich, 
R. B. Read, '79, 
R. B. Morrow, '82, 
H. L. Arbenz, '95, 
W. S. Murray, '95, 
W. J. McNULTY, '80, 

G. L. Yates, '97, 
G. L. Yates, '97, 

C. H. Detweiler, '90, 
C. H. Detweiler, '90, 
S. D. Warriner, '90, 
G. L. Yates, '97, 
W. S. Murray, '95, 



Date. 

Feb. 27, i8gi, 
May 12, 1879, 
May 3, 1879, 
May 20, 1893, 
May 19, 1883, 
May 14, 1887, 
Feb. 28, 1890, 
May iS, 1891, 
May 3, 1S79, 
May 26, 1877, 
May 14, 1881, 
May 13, 1893, 
Mar. 16, 1895, 
Oct. II, 1876, 
Feb. 27, 1897, 
May 15, 1895, 
May 10, 1890, 
May 10, 1890, 
May 18, 1889, 
Feb. 22, I896, 
Mar. 16, 1895, 



Record. 

4^ sec. 
loi sec. 
23X sec. 
54f sec. 

2 min. 85^ sec. 
4 min. 52 sec. 

3 min. 28 sec. 
7 min. 18 sec. 
17 min. 2 sec. 
27 min. 46 sec. 
x8 sec. 

29I sec. 

4 ft. 9 in. 

9 ft. 10 in. 

5 ft. 7 in. 
20 ft. 7^ in. 
93 ft- 5 in. 
36 ft. 2,y2 in. 

10 ft. 

9 ft. 1 ^ in. 
6 ft. 10 in. 



194 



fourteentb Minter riDectino 

OK THE 

Xebujb ITlniversit^ Btbletic Hesociation. 

IN THE GYMNASIUM, FEBRUARY 27tb, 1897. 

TRcferce. 

Mr. C. W. Smith. 



Mr. R. M. Wilcox, 



Mk. J. P. Brooks, 



Mr. a. E. Meaker. 



/n^easurerg. 

F. H. GuNsoLus, T. Mkkriman. 

Scorer. 

John Boyt. 



Cominiitee. 



Mr. C. W. Smith, 
G. L. Yates, '97, 
John Boyt, '97, 

* Running High Jump, 
Fence Vault, 
Standing High Jump. 
Running High Kick, 
t Running Broad Jump, 
Feather Wt. Boxing, 
Light Wt. Boxing, 
Middle Wt. Boxing, 
Heavy Wt. Boxing, 
Feather Wt. Wresthng, 
Light Wt. Wrestling. 
Heavy Wt. Wrestling, 
Horizontal Bar, 
Parallel Bar, 

* Lehigh Record Broken. 

t Lehigh Indoor Record Broken. 



L. S. Horner, '98, 
R. R. Horxor, '99, 
W. T. White, 1900. 





H^hnifr. 


Record. 


G. 


L. Yates, '97, 


5 ft. 


7 in. 


0. 


Sanchez, '99 (h'dc'p.S in.) 


6 ft. 


6i in 


M. 


H. Putnam, 97, 


4 ft. 


6^ in 


G. 


L. Yates, '97, 


8 ft. 


8^ in 


ij. 


L. Yates, '97, 


19 ft. 


10 in 


A. 


J. Brice, 1900. 






G. 


H DoRTCH, 1900. 






J. 


E. Slade, '97. 






R 


C. Becerra, '98. 






H 


. E. Knight, '99. 






J- 


E. Slade, '97. 






P. 


L. Reed, '98. 






J. 


J. Reamer, 1900. 






J- 


J. Rea:\ier, 1900. 







196 



1[ntev==(IolIeQtate Hssociation 
of Hmateur Htbletes of Hmerica^ 



Amherst, 

Brown, 

U. of California, 

Columbia, 

Cornell, 

Dartmouth, 

Fordham, 

Georgetown, 

Harvard, 



Colleges of tbe Bssoctatfon. 

U. of Iowa, 

Lafayette, 

Lehigh, 

U. of Michigan, 

C. C. N. Y., 

U. C N Y., 

U. of Pennsylvania, 

Princeton, 

Rutgers, 



©tficers. 



G. T. KiRBY, Columbia, 

R. D. Douglas, Georgetown, 

A. D. Call, Brown, 

F. B. Vermilya, C. C. N. Y., 



3£recuttv»e Committee, 



Stevens, 

Syracuse, 

Swarthmore, 

Trinity. 

Union. 

Wesleyan, 

Williams, 

Yale. 



President. 

Vice-Presiden t . 

Secretary. 

Treasurer, 



Howard Bill, N. Y. Univ., S. M. Kexdrick, Univ. of Pa., 

J. R. BowEN, Cornell., L. P. Sheldon, Yale., 

A. H. Bullock, Harvard. 



IRecorDs qX tbe 1Inter*Collegtate a. B. B. ^l B. 



Event, 

lOO Yards Dash, 
220 Yards Dash, 
440 Yards Dash, 
SSo Yards Run, 
Mile Run, 
Rung Broad Jump, 
Run'g High Jump, 
Putting Shot, 
Throwing Hammer, 

Pole Yault, 



Record. 
gi sec. 

Wld'sR.2iisec. 
49^ sec. 

I min. 564 sec. 
4 min. 23f sec. 
22 ft. 11^ in. 

6 ft. I in 
42 ft. \\\ in. 
135 ft. i\ in. 

II ft. 2f in. 5 



120 Yards Hurdle, 15* sec. 



220 Yards Hurdle, 
Mile Walk, 



24! sec. 
6 min. 5: 



sec. 



B. J. Wefers, Georgetown, May 29, '96 

B. J. Wefers, Georgetown, May 29, '96 
J. B. Shattuck, Amherst, May 30, 'gr 
E. Holister, Harvard, May 29, '96 
G. W. Orton, U. of P., May 25, '95 
Victor Mapes, Columbia, May 30, 'gi 
J. D. Windsor, U. of P., May 29, '96 
W. O. HicKocK, Yale, May 25, '95 
W. O. HicKocK, Yale, Mav 25, '95 

C. T. BUCKHOLTZ.U. ofP., ) VT„' 2, - , 

W\ W\ HoYT, Harvard, \ '^^^ ^^> 95 
H. L. Williams, Yale, / May 30, 'gi 
S. Chase, Dartmouth, ) May 25, '95 
J. L. Bremer, Harvard, May 25, '95 
F.A.BoRCHERLiNG,Princet'n, May 28, '92 



197 




Frank H. Gunsolus, 'q8, 
AuGUSTE L. Saltzman, '97, 
Edward D. Hillman, '98 , 



1896. 



Captain. 

Manager. 

Assistant Manager. 



J. G. Mason, '97, Right End. 
F. H. Gunsolus, '98, Right Tackle. 
R. C. Becerra, '99, Right Guard. 
S. J. Gass, '98, Quarter-Back. 
W. T. White, 1900, Left Half-Back. H. R. Van Duyne, '97, Right Half-Back. 
J. C. HoLDERNESS, '99, Full Back. 



W. B. Brady, '97, Left End. 
D. C. FuGiTT, igoo, Left Tackle. 
S. P. Senior, '97, Left Guard. 
W. T. McCarthy, 1900, Center 



Substitutes. 

W. Treichler, '97, H. S. Johnson, '97, L. S. Horner, '98, 

H. E. Knight, '99, M. Chamberlain, 1900. 





©ames plagcD 1896. 










Score. 


opponents. 


Date. 


Place. 


L. U. Opp. 


Princeton, 


Oct. 10. 


Princeton, N. J., 


16 


Rutgers, 


Oct. 14. 


So. Bethlehem, 


40 


Univ. of Pennsylvania, 


Oct. 17. 


Philadelphia, 


34 


Brown, . 


Oct. 2J. 


Providence, R. L, 


16 


Univ. of Michigan, 


Oct. 31. 


Detroit, Mich., 


40 


Annapolis, 


Nov. 14. 


Annapolis. . 


10 20 


Maryland Athletic Club, 


Nov. 30. 


Baltimore, 


25 


Total Number of Poin 


ts. 




75 126 




a 



& S 



z x 

OHO 

. < O 
-J UK 



Q . 



3 «: 



BASE 




BALL 



/llbanager. 

W. C. DlCKERMAN, '96. 



assistant /iRanager. 

G. C. White, '97. 



Captain. 

S. p. Senior, '97. 



Seam. 



J. G. Petrikin, '96, 2b, and s.s. 
P. L. Reed, '9S. l.f. 
L. S. Homer, 'qS, c. 

A. L SXVDEK, '99, 3b. 

J. W. Gannon, '99, p. and r.f. 

J. W. Grace, Jr., '99, ib. 



W. B. Taylor, '96, l.f. 



r. J. Gannon, '96, s.s. and 3b. 

G. if. Chasmar, '98, c.f 

C. K. Carman, '99, c 

S. P. Senidr, '97, p. lb. and 2b. 

E. G. Grace, '99, l.f. and b.s. 

H. K. Peck, '97, s.s. and 3b. 





Games ipIa^eO. 


Scorp 


Opponetits. 


Da/e. 


Place. 


L. U. 


opp. 


University of Virginia, 


Apr. 2, 


Charlotteville, 


3 


25 


Boston League 1 earn, 


Apr. 3, 


Charlotteville, 


6 


9 


Univ. of N. Carolina, 


Apr. 3, 


Chapel Hill, . 


4 


7 


Columbia University, 


Apr. 5, 


Washington, D. C, 


17 


7 


AUentown A. C, . 


Apr. II, 


Rittersville, 


7 


15 


Rutgers, 


Apr. 15, 


Kittersville, 


20 


8 


Pennsylvania, 


Apr. 18, 


Philadelpha, 


I 


■9 


Lafayette, 


.A.pr. 22, 


Easton, 


6 


27 


Trinity, 


Apr. 25. 


Rittersville, 


9 


10 


Princeton, 


Apr. 29, 


Princeton, 


I 


19 


New York University, 


May 6, 


Rittersville, 


14 


3 


Lafayette, 


May 9, 


Rittersville, 


b 


21 


Pennsylvania, 


May 13, 


Kittersville, 


8 


13 


U. S. N. A., . 


May 16, 


Annapolis, 


23 


12 


University of Virginia, 


May 20, 


Kittersville, 


10 


6 


West Point, 


. May 23, 


West Point, . 


7 


1 


Lafayette, 


May 30, 


Easton. 


4 


5 


Pennsylvania, 


June 6, 


Philadelphia, 


9 


8 


Total Number of 


Points 




155 


215 




_^ . w 

. Ci) ^ 

- < as 
<: as 






'J . ?-. 

• z ° - 

->« :? Si 

a - 2 



Ifnter^CoUegiate Hssociation of the 
ITlniteb States, 

Johns Hopkins University. 
Stevens Institute. Lehigh UnivePvSitv. 

©fficecs, 1 897. 

W. H. Maddren, Johns Hopkins, ..... President. 

R. S. Scott, Jr., Stevens, ...... J'ice-President. 

Thaddeus Merriman, Lehigh, . . . Secretary and Treasurer. 

JEjecuttve Committee. 

W. E. Mallalieu, Stevens. S. P. Harwood, Johns Hopkins. 

Henry T. Irwin, Lehigh. 





^^yes^-CQhbe,CiAf€. 



Ghahpiqks 



1S96. 



F. R. Bartles, '96, 
C. C. W. Bauder, '96, 

C. G. DUNNELl.S, '97, 



Captam. 

Manager. 

Assistant Manager. 



Ccam. 



J. H. Pennington. '97, . Goal. 
"G. B. Williams, '99, . Point. 

E. W. Miller, '96, . Cover Point. 
C;. R. Enscoe, '96, . First Defence. 
I. Boyt, '97, . Second Defence. 

B. M. McDonald, '96, Third Defence. 
H. Shriver, '96, . . . Center. 

E. P Roundev. '97, . First Attack. 
T. Merriman, "97, Second Attack. 



F. R. Bartles, '96, . Third Attach. 
H. W. Baldwin, '96, . Outside Home. 



opponents. 

Crescent A. C. , 
A. C. S. N , . 
Harvard, 
Crescent A. C , 
*Johns Hopkins, 
*Stevens, 
Toronto, 



Date. 
Apr. 2?, 
May 2, 
May 4. 
May 9, 
May 16, 
May 23, 
May 27, 



H. F. Boyer, '96, 


. I 


iside Home. 


V. W. Kline, '96, 






T. G. Mason, '96, 






D. W, Wilson, '96, 




Substitutes. 


E. H. Symington, ' 


98,' i 




William Gummere, 


•98. J 




eD, 1S96. 




Score. 


Place. 




L. U. Opp. 


South Bethlehem, 




3 3 


South Bethlehem, 




6 


South Bethlehem, 




4 I 


Brooklyn, 




3 8 


Baltimore, 




10 I 


South Bethlehem, 




4 3 


South Bethlehem, 




6 9 



Total number of goals. 
Games won, 4; games lost. 2 ; games tied, i. 

♦ Chamfiion.'ihip Ga>n,s. 

204 



36 



25 




5 2 A 



s H d 



& n 



t/T u 
S 



a 5 




H. I. Magee, 

G. H. DORTCH, 
M. SCHWERIN, 

F. J. Payne, 
J. N. Reese, 



jfresbman jfootbalL 



Class of 1900. 



J- 



G:eam. 



Right End. 

Right Tackle. 

. Right Guard. 

Center. 

Right Half-Back. 



R. A. Warner, 
J. R. Van Duyne, 
C. E. Maeder, 
M. Chamberlain, 
J. W. Burke, . 



N. S. Powell (Captain), Quarter-Back. 



Left End. 

Left Tackle. 

. Left Guard. 

FuU-Back. 

Left Half-Back. 



Substitutes. 

W. B. Grubb, J. G Ross, H. L. Lewis, R. J. Borhek. 

Game. 

Founder's Day, October S, 1S96, (Cane Spree.) 
'99 vs. 1900 — 3 to 4. 



206 




W H K 






OS 2 ? 




" Specker," the Phi Gamma Delta dog, and " Chimmie 

j^oun^er'0 Da^. 

October 8, 1S95. 
IVmner. 



the College Mascot. 



Event . 
Baseball Game 
Football Game 
Tug-of-War, 



Sophomores. 
Jackson, 
Carman, . 
Wentlino (Riegel), 

PlEZ, 

Hannum, 

YOUTSEY, . 

Gledhill, 
Knight (Capt.), 
James, 

HORNOR, 

Wood, 



Sopliomort 

Gannon, 

Carman, 

W. Grace, 

Wood, 

Farnham, 

E. Grace, 

Reddig, 

Hailey, 

Gledhill, 



Score. 






. 


Sophomores, 


3 


Freshmen, 


. 


jfootball. 






Freshmen. 


. Right End. . 


Grubbe. 


Right Tackle, . 


DORTCH. 


. Right Guard, 


Schwerein. 


Center, 


Payne. 


Left Guard, . 


Maeder. 


Left Tackle, 


Van Duyne. 


. Left End, 


Magee. 


Quarter Back, 


Powell (Capt.) 


. Right Half-Back, . 


Reese. 


Left Half-Back, . 


Burke. 


. Full-Back, . 


Chamberlain. 


JBascball. 






Freshmen. 


Pitcher, 


White (Capt). 


. Catcher, 


Fugitt. 


1st Base, 


Barager. 


. 2d Base, 


Chamberlain. 


3d Base, 


Cortright. 


. Short Stop, 


Po>IEROY. 


Right Field, 


Reese. 


. Center Field, . 


HOLLINGSWORTH. 


Left Field, 


Van Duyne. 



208 




A. O. Knight, 'gS, 
C. G. DuNNELLS, '97, 
L. E. Edgar, 'q8, 



©fHcers. 



President. 

]'ice-President. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 







/iRembers. 




F. 


C. Biggin, 


s. 


S. Clakke, 


II. 


B. Webb, 


c. 


G. Dunn ells, '97, 


H. 


T. Irwin, '97, 


c. 


P. Nachod, '97, 


R. 


C. NoERR, '97, 


J- 


L. Sheppard, Jr., '97, 


H. 


C. TscHUDY, '97, 


c. 


P. Wagoner. '97, 


W 


. WORTHINGTON, '98, 


L. 


E. Edgar, '98, 


L. 


S. HORNER, '98, 


A. 


0. Knight, '98, 


H. 


M. Daggett, '98, 


S. 


B. Merrill, '98, 


G. 


B. Williams, '99, 


T. 


C. Visscher, '99, 


H, 


, A. Wilcox, '99, 


M 


. Chamberlain, 1900, 


J- 


R. Van Duyne, 1900, 


R. 


A. Warner, 1900, 


D. 


H. Canfield, 1900, 


R. 


W. BouRS, 1900, 


T. 


W. Lukens, 1900, 


R. 


M. Cortright, 1900, 


E. 


R. Zalinski, 1900, 


A. 


B. Anderson, 1900, 


D. 


B. Abbott, 1900, 


II 


. B. Chapman, 1900, 


E. 


T. Satchell, 1900, 


H 


. I. Magee, 1900. 



2og 




From "Outing." 



Xebiob lUniversit^ (5un Club* 



J- 



J. Grant Cramer, 
C. L. Thornburg, 
T. M. Clinton, . 
R. E. L. George, 



President. 

Vice President. 

Secretary &^ Treasurer. 

Warden. 



C. W. Thorn, 
H. M. Daggett, Jr., 
E. R. Zalinski, 
J. M. Galan, Jr., 



/llbembers. 

J. E. Slade, 
H. T. Green, 
H. R. Palmer, 
E. H. Waring, 



L. R. Lee, 
J. R. Van Duyne, 
W. G. Hare, 
J. L. Melxell. 



Scores of jfootball, Baseball anb 
Xacrosse (3ame8- 

Played i;y Lehigh Teams up to the Year 1896. 











IfootbalU 
















1884. 








Oct. 


25- 


Lafayette vs 


Lehigh, 


50- 


Nov. 


12. 


Lafayette vs. Lehigh, 


34- 4 


Nov. 


I. 


Rutgers 


'' 


61- 




22. 


Haverford " 


36-12 










1885. 








Oct. 


TO. 


U. of P. vs. 


Lehigh, 


54- 


Nov. 


14- 


Rutgers vs. Lehigh, 


5-10 


'' 


17- 


Haverford 


" 


24- 8 


. 


iS. 


U. of P. 


35- 


•' 


3r- 


Lafayette 


' 


0- 


' • 


21. 


Lafayette 


6- 6 


Nov. 


7- 


Stevens 




20- 4 


















1886. 








Oct. 


9- 


U. of P. V-. 


Lehigh, 


26- 4 


Nov. 


13- 


Stevens vs. Lehigh, 


0-14 


" 


16. 


Dickinson 


'' 


0-26 


" 


17- 


U. of P. 


28 


" 


30. 


Stevens 


■' 


0- 


•' 


20. 


Haverford 


4-18 


Nov 


6. 


Lafayette 




f2- 


" 


24. 


Lafayette 


0- 










1887. 








Oct. 


8. 


Sw'thm'e vs. 


Lehigh, 


0-24 


Nov. 


12. 


U. of P. vs. Lehigh, 


6- 4 


" 


15- 


Princeton 


" 


So- 


•' 


23- 


Lafayette " 


6- 


" 


22. 


Dickinson 




0-20 


" 


24- 


Cornell '' 


10-38 


■' 


29. 


Lafayette 


" 


4-10 


















18S8. 








Sept. 


29. 


Princeton vs 


Lehigh, 


75- 


Oct. 


27. 


U. of P. vs. Lehigh, 


36- 


Oct. 


6. 


Swarthmore 


" 


8-12 


Nov. 


9- 


State College " 


0-32 


" 


13- 


Rutgers 


■' 


0-30 


" 


10. 


Stevens " 


O-IO 


" 


17- 


Haverford 


'■ 


6-16 


'• 


17- 


Lafayette '' 


4- 6 


" 


20. 


Swarthmore 


" 


0-50 











lO. 

I6. 
19. 
30. 



Oct. 5. Princeton vs. I.ehigh, 
" 10. 

Haverford " 

U. of P. 

Lafayette " 

Nov. 2. Columbia " 

Oct. 9. Sw'thm'e vs. Lehigh, 

II. Yale 

18. U. of P. 

" 25. Princeton 

Nov. I. Lafayette 

" 4. Rutgers 

Sept. 26. Bucknell vs. Lehigh. 

Oct. 3 State Col. *' 

" 8. Princeton '' 

" 10. F. and M. 

" 14. Princeton '' 

" 17. Rutgers '' 

" 24. U. of P. 



Oct. I. Sw'thm'e vs. Lehigh, 

'• 5. Princeton '' 

*' 15. Orange A. C. '" 

*' ig. Princeton '' 

" 22. Cornell " 

Sept. 30. Dickinson vs. Lehigh, 

Oct. 7. Princeton " 

14. U. S. M. A. 

18. U. of P. 

" 25. Princeton '' 

Sept. 29. Rutgers vs. Lehigh, 

Oct. 6. Princeton '' 

" 10. Swarthmore '' 

■' 13. Yale " 

" 17. U. of P. 

" 20. Indians '' 

*' 24. Princeton 



4- 
16. 
20. 
22. 

28. 



Nov. 



8. 

15- 
22. 



29. 



)l. 



Oct. 
Nov. 



18S9. 
16- o Nov. 
16- 4 

0-60 

6- 4 
10-16 

6-51 
I 

0-50 
26- o 

8- o 

50- o ! 
0-30 

2- 4 

] 

4-62 

2-4 

18- o 

0-22 

30- o 

0-22 

42- o 

IS92. 

0-51 I Nov 
16- o 1 '' 

8-4 '• 

50-0 " 

76- o 1 " 
1S93. 

0-52 
12- o 

0-18 

32- 6 

28- 6 

1894. 
0-24 , Oct. 27. 



Oct. 
Nov. 



5- 
8. 

12. 

19. 

26. 

28. 

4- 
II. 



State Col. vs. Lehigh, 0-106 

Lafayette '' 6-6 

U. of P. " o- 8 

Wesleyan ' ' 1 1 - 1 1 

U. S. N. A. " 6- 26 



Col. A. C. vs. Lehigh, 6-60 

Lafayette " 6 66 

U. of P. " 17-14 

U. S. N. A. " 4-24 

Col. A. C. " 6-34 



Yale vs. Lehigh, 38- o 

Lafayette " 4-22 

Cornell '' 24- o 

Lafayette '' 2-6 

U. of P. " 32- o 

Lafayette " 2-16 



Lafayette vs. Lehigh, 4- o 

U. of P. " 4-0 

Temp. A. . " 4 32 

Lafayette " 6-15 

Pittsburg A. C. " 0-21 

U. S. N. A. vs. Lehigh, 6 12 

Lafayette '' 6 22 

Cornell '' u-14 

Lafayette " 0-10 

Univ. of N. C. " o 34 

Orange A. C. vs. Lehigh, 14- o 



8- 


'' 


31- 


Univ. of N. 


C. 


6-24 


0-33 


Nov. 


3- 


U. S. N. A 




10- 


34- 


f ( 


10. 


Yale 




' 50- 


30- 


" 


16. 


Lafayette 




' 28- 


12-22 


> ( 


24. 


Lafayette 




8-11 


32- 


'' 


29. 


Cornell 




4- 6 



1895. 



Sept. 28. Rutgers vs Lehigh, 

Oct. 14. U. of P. 

" 19. Princeton " 

Nov. 2. Orange A. C. " 

Oct. 10. Priiceton vs. Lehigh, 

" 14. Rutgers '' 

17. U. of P. 

" 24. Brown " 



0-25 
54- o 
16-0 

2- o 



Nov. 



g. Lafayette vs. Lehigh, 21-12 

16. U. S. N. A. '• 4- 6 

23. Lafayette '' 14- 6 

28. Baltimore A. C. '' o 10 



1896. 



16- o 

0-44 

34- o 

16- o 



Oct. 31. U. of .M. vs. Lehigh, 40- o 

Nov. 14. U.S. N. A. '• 24-10 

'■ 26. Maryland A. C. " 026 



asaseball. 

18S5. 



Apr. 25. Allentown vs. Lehigh, 

May 2. Lafayette '' 

" 9. Rutgers " 

" 16. U. of P. 

Apr. 3. U. of P. vs. Lehigh, 

" 10. Picked Nine " 

'' 17. Lafayette " 

Apr. 22. Johns Hop. vs. Lehigh, 

" 23. Dickinson 

" 30. Lafayette " 

May 6. Reading " 

Apr. 7. Allentown vs. Lehigh, 

" II. Lafayette '• 

" 21. Dickinson " 

" 28. St. John " 

Mar. 23. Allentown vs. Lehigh, 

'' 29. " " 

Apr. 6. Haverford '' 

" 24. Reading "' 

May I. Trinity " 

" 3. Cornell " 



13- 2 


May 


20 


•2- 5 


" 


30. 


1- 5 


June 


b. 


21- 9 






1886. 




21- 5 


May 


I. 


7-12 


(I 


3- 


23- 4 


' * 


7- 


1887. 




22-20 


May 


7- 


I-.- 6 


" 


13- 


12- 6 


" 


14. 


12- 2 







22- 

22- 
14. 

4- 



1888. 

6 

5 

7 

5 

1889. 



May 



6- I 
2- 3 
»5-24 
13- 3 
14-19 
22- I 



May 



29. 



Allentown vs. Lehigh, 22- 3 
Rutgers " 2r-i5 

Lafayette " 6-2 



Wilkesbarre vs. Lehigh, 20- o 
Columbia " 25- 3 

Trinity " 8-4 



Dickinson vs. Lehigh, 10- g 
Star '' 1 7-3S 

Rutgers " S-12 



St. John vs. Lehigh, 13- i 
Kensington " 8- 11 

Lafayette " 8-5 



4- 


Cornell vs. 


Lehigh, 


18-11 


10. 


U. of P. 




7 7 


II. 


P'ottstown 




14- 4 


18. 


Lafayette 




6- 8 


25. 


U. of P. 




16- 2 


28. 


Lafayette 




10- 



213 



1890. 



Mar. 26. Muhlenb'g vs. Lehigh. 

" 27. Actives 

Apr. 2. Philadelphia 

'' 3. Washington 

4. U.ofVa. 

5- 

" 7. Johns Hopkins 

" 8. Georgetown 

" 12. Princeton 

16. U. of P. 



0- 


15 


3- 


5 


13- 





20- 


7 


6- 


ro 


6- 


9 


10- 


7 


6- 





13- 


1 


7_ 


1 1 



Apr. 



May 



19. 


Princeton vs. 


Lehigh, 


8- 4 


22. 


Trinity 






3-10 


23- 


Easton 






II- 6 


3- 


Lafayette 






0- 2 


Q- 


Muhlenberg 






I-2I 


14- 


Lafayette 






4- 4 


16. 


U. of Va. 






4- 6 


22. 


St. Johns 






117 


23. 


U. of P. 






8- 7 



Apr. 4. Williams vs. Lehigh, 

6. So. Beth. A. C. 

" 9. Philadelphia 

' 15. U.ofP. 

" 18. St. Johns 

" 25. Yale 

May 2. Lafayette 

'' 6. Ursinus 



Apr. 8. 

9- 

" 12. 

■' 15- 

" 16. 

" 20. 

" 23. 

" 27. 

'■ 30- 



Apr. 5. 

" 12. 

■' 15- 

•' li 

" 26. 



Dartm'th vs. Leh 
Princeton 
Harvard 
U. of Va. 

Swarthmore 
Princeton 
Lafayette 
U. of P. 



Harvard vs. Lehigh, 
Dartmouth " 

Princeton 
Trinity 
Allentown 
•' 29. U. of P. 
May 6. Cornell 



3- 


10 


4- 


16 


II- 


2 


7- 


2 


2- 





13- 


3 


9- 


5 


4- 


T4 ; 



May 9 

" 12 

■' 20 

■' 27 

•• 29 

'• 30 

" 30 

June 3 



1893. 



14- 2 

12- 5 

16- 2 
3 21 
5- 6 

17- 4 

7- 3 

7- 4 



1892. 

4- 7 ' May 

lo- 1 " 

16- I 

6- 9 

8- 6 

6-13 

10- 6 

3- 9 

I- 7 



II. 
18. 
20. 
24. 
25- 

27- 

30. 



May 13 

" 17 
' 20 
24 
" 29 
" 30 
June 13. 



Lafayette vs Lehigh, 

U. of P. 

Lafayette 

Cornell 
S. L A. C. 

U. of P. 



Lafayette vs. Lehigh, 
Wesleyan 

U. of P. 

It 

Cornell 

U. of Mich. 
Lafayette 
U. of P. 
Yale 



U. of P. vs. 
Lafayette 
U. S. M. A. 
Lafayette 
Yale Law S. 
Lafayette 



Lehigh, 



15- 5 

2- I 

3- 2 
3-15 
5- 7 
9- 4 

13- 9 
i-ii 



3-18 
2-10 
3- 4 
9- 4 
9- I 
12- 4 

5- 4 
2- 2 
1- 2 



18- 7 
3- 5 
3-10 
7- 2 
4-14 
4-10 

11-17 



214 



1 894. 



Mar. 22. 
" 23. 
" 24. 
" 26. 

" 31- 
18. 
21. 
28. 



Apr. 



May 



Apr. 6 

10 
II 

12 
13 
15 
17 
20, 

24 

27 



Apr. 



2. 

3- 

3- 

5- 

II. 

15- 

18. 
22. 
25- 



U. of Va. vs. Lehigh, 

Richmond " 

U.ofN. C. 

If (I 

Williams 

Temperance " 

Columbia " 

Allentown " 

Princeton "' 

Columbia vs. Lehigh, 

Georgetown 

U. ofVa. 

Trinity (N. C.) " 

U. of N. C. 

Allentown 

U. of P. 

State College "' 

Lafayette ' ' 

U. of Va. vs. Lehigh, 

Boston L. T'm " 
U. of N. C. 

Columbia " 

Allentown A. C. " 

Rutgers " 
Pennsylvania 

Lafayette ' ' 

Trinity ' ' 



11- 4 

13- 7 

12- 7 

6- I 
6-12 
3-14 

10-10 

9- 2 

12- 5 

lE 

12-22 

14- 5 

14- 9 

7- 9 
2- I 

6- 3 
16-14 

24- 3 

15- 7 

7- 9 
1$ 

25- 3 
9- 6 

7- 4 
7-17 
15- 7 
8-20 
19- I 
27- 6 
10- 9 



May 



5 


Lafayette 


vs. Lehi 


gh, 7- 5 


9 


Princeton 


' 


•3- 3 


16 


U. of P. 




17- 9 


19 


Cornell 


' 


6- 


23 


Lafayette 




5-II 


26 


U. S. M. 


A. 


3- 5 


30 


Lafayette 




14- 6 


9 


' ' 


*■ 


5- 9 



Tune 



May I. Princeton vs. Lehigh. 10- i 

" 4. Lafayette '" 1-3 

•' II. U. S. N. A. " 13-15 

15. U. of P. " 10- 8 

•' t8. U. S. M. A. " 5-12 

22. Lafayette " 8-1 1 

" 25. Carlisle Indians " 2-1 

June I. Elizabeth A. C. " 3-6 

" 3. Brown ' 14-3 

" 12. U. of P. '• 16- 8 
16. 

Apr. 29. Princeton vs. Lehigh, 19- i 

May 6. N. Y. Univ. " 3-14 

" 9. Lafayette " 21-6 

" 13. U. of Pa. " 13- 8 

" 16. U. S. N. A. •' 12-23 

" 20. U. of Va. '" 6-10 

" 23. West Point " i- 7 

" 30. Lafayette ' 5-4 

[une 6. U. of Pa. '• 8- 9 



1885. 
May 9. Stevens vs. Lehigh, 

Apr. 30. Stevens vs. Lehigh, 
May 7. N. Y. Univ. " 
" 18. Rutgers " 



Xacrosse. 



4- o 



1886. 



May 15. Stevens vs. Lehigh, i- o 



1887. 



4- 2 
0-12 



May 19. Allentown vs. Lehigh. i- 6 
" 21. Brooklyn " 2-3 



Apr. 23. M. Leaves vs. Lehigh, 2- 1 

" 30. Druids " 6-0 

May 7. Rutgers " o- q 



May 12. 

" 19- 

'• 30. 



1889. 



Apr. 27. Johns Hop. vs. Lehigh, 

'' 30. Philadelphia " 

May 8. Rutgers " 

" II. Princeton '' 

Apr. 26. Brooiciyn vs. Lehigh, o- 

May 3. Stevens " i- 

" 10. Johns Hopkins " 2- 



6- o 

7- I 
3-12 
6- o 

iS 



Apr. 17. C. C. N. Y. vs. Lehigh, 

" 25. N.Y. A. C. 

" 30. U.ofP. 

May 2. S. L A. C. " 

Apr. 16. P. A. S. C. vs. Lehigh, 

" 30. N. Y. A. C. 

May I. Druids " 

May 4. Cornell vs. Lehigh, 

6. S. L A. C. 

" 10. A. C. S. N. ■' 

" 13. Stevens " 

May 5. Cres. A. C. vs. Lehigh, 

" 12. 

" ig. Johns Hop. " 

Apr. 27. Cres. A. C. vs. Lehigh, 

May I. N. Y. Univ. 

" 4. Cres. A. C. 

" 8. N. Y. Univ. 

" II. Cornell 



189 
o-ii I 
4- 6 
o- 6 
2- 2 I 

i8g 



May 18. 
" 25. 
" 30. 



May 17. 

" 24. 

" 30. 
I. 

May 7. 

" 9- 

" 16. 

" 20. 



1- 8 

5- I 

2- 6 
1893. 



May 21. 
" 28. 



0- 


5 


May 29 


0- 


8 


" 31 


2- 


5 


June 3 


3- 


6 






18 


94- 



May 23. 
" 26. 



6- 4 

1895. 

3- 4 ; May iS. 

" 25. 

" 30. 

June 5. 



4- 3 
4- 2 
3- 2 

3- 8 



1896. 



Apr. 25. Cres. A. C. vs. Lehigh, 3- 3 

May 2. A. C. S N. " o- 6 

'■ 4. Harvard " 1-4 

'• 9. Cres. A. C. " 8- 3 



May 16. 

" 23. 

" 27. 



Princeton vs. Lehigh, 3- i 

Harvard '' 8-0 

Stevens " 2-3 

C. C. N. Y. vs. Lehigh, o-ii 

Harvard " 0-3 

Brooklyn " 6-4 



Brooklyn vs. Lehigh, 3- 2 
Princeton " 1-3 

Philadelphia " 3-3 



Druids vs. Lehigh f)- 

Stevens " 4- 

Johns Hop. " 5- 

N. Y. A. C. " 8- 



Johns Hop. vs. Lehigh, 3- 6 
Stevens '' 3-0 



Johns Hop. vs. Lehigh, 3- 6 
A. C. S. N. " 5- 5 

Univ. of Tor. " 9- 3 



Crescent A. C.vs. Lehigh, i- i 
Stevens " 3-2 



Johns Hop. vs. Lehigh, o- 5 

Stevens " 1-6 

Cornell " 3-4 

Toronto '' 6-4 



Johns Hop. vs. Lehigh, i-io 
Stevens '' 3-4 

Univ. of Toronto " 9-6 



216 



Z\^c Ibon. lEcl^lep B. Coye. 

eVERY one who studies the history of our country must be struck with 
the vast influence which personal character exerts in a republic like 
ours. The monarchies of the old world rejoice to honor men whose 
ancestrj^ is their only claim to distinction. There the possession of 
inherited estates unaccompanied by personal merit can exalt mediocrity, and 
this condition of things also tends to hold back from proper recognition and 
encouragement the men of the people whose capabilities are far beyond 
those of the aristocrats who occupy the proud places in society and state. 
With us birth and the opportunities afforded by inherited wealth greatly 
aid the aspirant to fame and influence, but they can only be, in the long 
run, the steps whereby .the noblemen of the Great Republic climb to their 
honorable stations They smooth the way to success, but they do not furnish 
the credentials, for these can come from personal merit alone We who have 
known the history of Lehigh University, can point with pride to one whose 
interest in our Alma Mater has caused us to recognize both in his written and 
spoken words, and still more by his kindly presence and generous actions, 
that loftiness of .soul which distinguished him in all the varied activities of his. 
long career of usefulness and honor, and which marked him as possessing the 
highest qualities of modern chivalry. 

Eckle}' Brinton Coxe, was born in Philadelphia on the fourth of June, 
1839. His fa'Mily had come to this country about 1700, and in the latter part 
of the century had acquired large tracts of land in the neighborhood of Drifton 
where coal was soon after discovered This splendid domain was thus waiting 
for some one to develop its wealth. Mr. Coxe entered the University of Penn- 
sylvania in 1854, graduated in 1858, and then pursued advanced courses in sub- 
jects that seemed of value to his future career. This same year he took part 
in a topographical survey of the coal region, and, in 1S60, he went to Paris and 
studied for two years in the celebrated " Ecole des Mines."' In this great 
school and latter at Freiberg, in Saxony, he made himself perfectly familiar 
with the science of mining engineering, and came home with a splendid 
mental equipment for his life-work. His first undertaking after his return to 
his native land was the translation into English of the first part of the monu- 
mental work of his teacher at Freiberg, Prof. Julius Weisbach. This volume 
upon Theoretical Mechanics was published in 1S70, and served to introduce 
Mr. Coxe to the engineering profession in America. His interest in science 
was further displaved by his activity in the organization of the American In- 
stitute of Mining Engineers in 1871. He took a leading part in this important 
association in which he held the office of Vice-President for ten years, and was 
twice elected its President. Its transactions contain many papers from his 
pen, and his generous aid was given at all times to support and develop this, 
useful society. 

The great achievement of his life was the organization and development 
of the extensive mining industries upon his ancestral estates which finally 
covered over 35,000 acres. These were equipped in the best manner and con- 

217 




ECKLEY B. COXE. 



nected with four different railroad systems by tracks constructed and operated 
under his direction, and this connecting line transported in 1894 over 2,000,000 
tons of anthracite. The corporation controling these enterprises is known as 
the Cross Creek Coal Company, and has exerted a most beneficent influence in 
the coal regions, because not only are its business arrangements characterized 
by sound commonsense, but its relations to its operatives have been based 
upon a proper recognition of their physical, mental and moral needs. Nowhere 
can one find more comfortable homes for the miners, nowhere are the sick and 
wounded more kindly cared for; while the night school which Mr. Coxe estab- 
lished, now "The jMining and Mechanical Institute of the Anthracite Coal 
Region of Pennsylvania.'' at Freeland, Luzerne County, has enabled worthy 
young men to attain to positions of trust, and his generosity made it possible 
for some to go through a complete course at Lehigh University. A free 
library and reading-room afforded to all improvement and healthy amu.sement. 
Employers seldom calculate the real weight of the influence for good which 
they might exert if they only would. But when the hosts of his friends 
gathered at Drifton, on May i6th, 1895, to pay the last tribute of respect to 
his remains, it was very touching to see the evidences of deep grief and real 
affection and to hear the many stories of his sympathy and helpful regard for 
those under his charge. If some one of those awful accidents which now and 
then occur at the mines took place at Drifton he was on the spot to lead and 
plan the rescue or comfort the afflicted. Here was no soulless corporation 
with heart of steel, but a noble man whose constant effort was to elevate and 
ennoble the toil and travail of his fellow-men. 

His devotion to science was untiring, and he surrounded himself with able 
assistants, .so that he constantly made additions to the stock of useful knowl- 
edge, and by his inventions, especially in his improvements directed towards 
the use of the smaller sizes of coal which heretofore had been wasted, he 
made possible a great saving in this important commodity. For his own use 
and that of his engineers, he gathered a superb library, which comprised that 
of Professor Weisbach, and also the various scientific works and periodicals 
which appeared after his teacher's death. This collection, through the gener- 
osity of Mrs. Coxe, has recently been presented to Lehigh University, and will 
be consulted by many scientific men in its new repository. 

This University owes much to the wise counsel and generous support of 
Mr. Coxe, who was a member of its Board of Trustees from 1S71 until his 
death. During the last years of his life he took an active part in all move- 
ments for its advancement, and was ever ready to do all in his power to 
strengthen its equipment and to encourage its officers. We have listened with 
pleasure to his brilliant discussions, and our young investigators have gained 
inspiration from his earnest enthusiasm. It is a great gain to have met in the 
course of our career one so genuine and noble, so thoroughly conscientious and 
high-minded, for it shows us that our own day and the avocations of business 
and science can be ennobled and transfigured by character and religion, so 
that the knight of modern civilization is grander and more beneficent than the 
heroes of the past. E. M. H. 



219 




PROF. MERRIMAN. 

Z\K Civil lEnginccring Course. 

TTilTH that usual amount of greenish tinge which characterizes all Fresh- 
141 men, those who had allied themselves to Course I. immediately began 
%%^ to journey together in perfect unison and harmony. In the first year we 
became intimately acquainted with " My Letter Hook," the most brill- 
iant and exhaustive treatise on the art of lettering ever published. 

The Sophomore year was quickly passed with nightmare memories of 
Math, and Mechanics. Some passed and some didn't. Our course in Delsarte 
was augmented by a class in mountain climbing Many a time and oft did we 
toil painfully up the steep sides of '■ Shanty Hill." forcing our way through the 
luxuriant growth of tomato cans, armed only with three-legged telescopes and 
twelve-foot barber poles to protect ourselves from the ferocious two-horned 
beasts that roam wild over their native heath. 

As Juniors we entered upon the more practical side of our college course. 
One short struggle, and we left the dreaded Math, behind us forever. As 
antiquarians, we one day trudged six miles and back, over dusty roads (our 
instructor rode on a bicycle) to inspect a lime kiln built by the ancients many 
years previous to the conquest of Pennsylvania by the Dutch. Other trips of 
this sort went far to break the monotony of recitation and drawing room. 

Thus we have passed the first three years ; the fourth and final still lies 
before us, and in it we expect to complete that knowledge which will enable us 
to go out in the world and carve our names and that of Lehigh University 
deep in the monuments of civil engineering science. 




PROF. KLEIN. 



riDecbanical jenGineeiin^ doursc^ 

•rwS FRESHMEN we came, and alas! some returned as such, but the 
rm bravest remained. We faltered at Chemistry, and many were pre- 
J I ciPiTATED into the depths of despair, but soon there came a reaction, 
and we again pushed forward. German, we did find rather difficult, but 
we soon thought nothing of such words as " Unterscheidungszeichendringen." 
In Machine Design, 'tis true we may have designed three-quarter mch bolts 
to enter one-half inch holes; but experience we know is a hard teacher, and 
yet she is a conscientious old lady, and one soon forgets that his back is lame 
and his fingers aching in his efforts to please her. Then there was Strength 
of Materials, upon which such great stress is laid. She beamed forth m all her 
splendor, and from shear love for her, one often went so far as to say, "I 
really can-ti-lever until she has told me everything." And the Shops, how 
sweet the memory ! We often found warm friends in even the twisted steel 
shavings; but alas! many of us dropped their acquaintance on short notice. 

'Tis a course in which there is hard work, but at the same time, there is 
oft and ever a flow of jollity and wit, and why should there not be. "All 
work and no play makes Jack a dull boy," and are not the words of our great 
forefather sufBcient in their quaint simplicity ? , r u 

May our course with her kind and ever helping chief stand forth as a 
bright and never-fading star among her sisters. 









I'ROF. FRAZIER. 

^he flDininG lEnoincering Coureee. 

TTlHAT would Lehigh be without her courses in Mining and Mining En- 
iAI gineering ? This is a question which could not be very well answered. 
%%^ It would be absurd to have a technical school in the Lehigh Valley, 
where mining and metallurgical industries are so flourishing, without 
courses to fit young men for these fields. It follows from this that the E. M.'s 
and Metallurgists constitute an important factor at Lehigh. Although lacking 
the numbers of the other courses, they more than make up for it by their mag- 
nificent stature, good qualities, and achievements. In scholastic lines, the 
miners and metallurgists stand way ahead ; the rigor of the courses demands 
this, for the most difficult subjects are combined to constitute them. For 
the first two years and a half, it is difficult to tell what we will become. 
Some would say chemists, others mechanicals or civils, and some might .say 
students of theology. However, at the end of the first term Junior, the more 
specific studies are taken up. Naturally, it is found necessary to throw in a 
little chemistry and steam engine just to keep one's hand in, and keep the 
student from enjoying any leisure. Up to the end of the Junior year, our .sleep 
is disturbed by French or " Dutch," but after this time they are buried away 
deep, never more to be resurrected. 

The two studies of which we are particularly proud are Mineralogy and 
Metallurgy. In the former subject, we have with us the chemists and civils, 
and here is where their '' fiends" strike their first condition if they have not 




PROF. WILLIAMS. 

already flunked Crystallography. In Metallurgy the mechanicals dabble 
and they share a fate similar to that of the chemists and civils. But what ot 
the metallurgist ? He has been so trained from his early Freshman days that 
these things have no terror for him. He simply "goes, sees, and conquers. 

These courses, however, have more than one pleasmg teature ihey 
simplv abound with trips of inspection to the " Bethlehem Iron \A orks, 
Catasauqua, and Hokendauqua, and these are generally taken during vaca- 
tion The last trip of the Senior Metallurgists occured durmg the sprmg 
vacation, and they went all the way to Lebanon. They went, they were not 
taken ; they paid their own fare, and hence the party consisted of an instructor 
and three students. They had a very pleasant time, during which they got 
their lungs filled with sulphurous gases, and hunted m the snow for fossils or 
glaciers or something. During this latter period of the trip, the party had 
dwindled down to the instructor and one student. Such is the endurance ot 
the Senior Metallurgists. . , i ^ foi,^^ 

In athletics and musical affairs, the mining engineers have always taken 
a prominent part. The section football team of the Senior class was never 
beaten, each man playing two positions at the same time, and often three or 
four positions when occasion demanded. As to music, it can be truthfully said 
that there never was a more musical set of fellows, barring perhaps the 
Junior Mechanicals. ,,, „ ^ a ,. v,^ fv,^ 

The courses in Mining Engineering and Metallurgy are reputed to be the 
best and most difficult in college; and to any one who is fortunate enough to 
get a diploma, it can be said: "Well done, thou good and faithful servant! 



223 




DR. MACFARLANE. 



^be Course in lEIectncal jEnGineerina. 

CHE Electrical Department ? O, yes ! that's the part of the University in 
which the students known as •' Bum Electricals," are interested. Some- 
thing of the sort might have been heard two or three years ago had a 
.,u^ , question been asked about this department, but the answer can no longer 
be the above, for the Department of Electrical Engineering has grown rapidly 
in the past few years and established itself among the best in the University 
(regardless of the decision of the debatmg societies). 

In this course of Electrical Engineering, unlike some of the others, the 
student must have among many virtues, that of patience, especially if he is am- 
bitious. For so long a time is spent in preparation for the work to come, be- 
fore the student actually begins his work in Electricity, that he sometimes 
almost loses sight of his course, and is apt to think himself a draughtsman, 
chemist, or something of the kind. But in due time the trouble of chemistry 
having ceased, machine design, projection and freehand drawing and 
lettering having been worried through with, and the vexation of qualitative 
analysis having spent themselves in vain attempts to ruin the Electrical Engi- 
neer's moral character, he starts his true course with lectures in Electricity 
and Magnetism. About these lectures it might be fair to say that they excite 
the hearer's curiosity, he learns a little, he fails to learn a great deal more, but 
on the whole, cannot he blamed, as his imagination has not yet been sufficiently 



224 



cultivated. That only comes when he studies Calculus and Mechanics. These 
names, due to ancient traditions clinging to them, carry great weight and in- 
spire the beginner with awe; but soon he begins to see their real object, 
the cultivation of the imagination and memory. Now after two or three 
months spent in class four, or that other class without a name, and a hard 
struggle to reach class three, his embryo imagination begins to e>pand and 
grow until when he starts the study of alternating currents, second term 
Junior, he is able to imagine all sorts of things in space, and can locate the 
lines of force of a magnetic field so accurately as to place an earth coil per- 
pendicular to them at sight and tell you exactly how many are threading the 
circuit. 

But we had almost overlooked his course in the Physical Laboratory; and 
that would have been an unpardonable neglect, for it is here that he spends 
some of the most profitable and pleasant days of his course. He learns to 
make and read verniers, to correct and use a balance, to squint through a 
telescope all day without having the tears cour.se down his face, and completes 
his studies with a day spent on the mountain-side herding goats and taking 
barometric readings. 

At last, after a year of patient study of dynamo-electric machinery, tele- 
phones and telegraphs, and many experiments in the electric laboratory both 
interesting and otherwise, he reaches the goal of his ambition which has con- 
fronted him every day for nearly three years whenever he entered the physical 
laboratory, the dynamo-room. Ah! There indeed life begins, and the degree 
E. E. seems to approach. What can be compared to the throwing in and out 
of dynamos and alternators, to the reading of volt meters and ammeters, to 
this' life in a real atmosphere of magnetic lines of force amid the buzz and 
hum of electrical machinery. Now, truly is the life of the Electrical Engineer 
worth living, at least for a while, for finally we find this energetic E. E., after 
a dreamj' gaze about the room in search of the instructor, slipping off to one of 
the little rooms across the hall where benches are provided for the wean,-. On 
these he ma}' shortly be found lulled to sleep by the busy hum of the 
machinery, and smiling over pleasant dreams of his future doings in the world 
at large when he has passed the goal and left his Alma Mater with his much 
treasured sheep-skin safely tucked away under his arm. 



^ 



225 




PROF. CHANDLER. 



^be Cbcmistr^ doursc. 



OF the departments of the University, the chemical is probably the most 
thoroughly equipped, and any man who thinks we have an easy time — 
simply because we have no mathematics after our Freshman year — 
would quickly change his mind if he were to visit the chemical building 
and poke his nose into the H^S room of the Qualitative Lab., or watch the 
Sophomore A. C.'s make titrations in the Quantitative Lab., and listen to the 
aforesaid Sophomore's language when he can't find a certain shade of pea- 
green purple, or because he can't hoist some particular odor from a villianous 
looking compound. 

Chemistry, taken as a whole, is a very interesting study, but the most 
interesting part of it consists in speculating as to how much of the original 
" Lab. Deposit'' will eventually come home to roost, and as we progress from 
Qualitative to Quantitative, from Quantitative to Organic, and then to 
Industrial Chemistry, this question of '' Where in the thunder did all my Lab. 
Deposit go " ? becomes of more and more importance. 

The first subject pertaming to Chemistry that occupies the Freshman's 
attention is what is known as Theoretical ChemLstry. This consists in filling out 
one hundred and forty-seven pages of an 8x9 inch note-book with as much 
sense as can be gathered (between naps) from a series of lectures. (N. B. — 
Give Mrs. Lucas three pages). After the first term Theoretical Chemistry 

226 



is dropped and the Freshmen (those who have not been included in the 
dropping process) are then introduced to the Qualitative Laboratory, where 
they spend a term learning to flip pennies scientifically in order to determine 
what is contained in substances given to them to analyze. 

During the whole of the Sophomore year and the first term of the Junior 
year, the Chemist works in the Quantitative Laboratory (with the exception of 
a few leisure moments spent out of doors smoking a cigarette) and toys with 
the metric system of weights and measures, doctoring his calculations to make 
them fit his immediate wants. Quantitative Conference and Mineralogy 
cause some deep thinking and one or two flunks. 

We now come to the life of the Senior Chemist, which is not by any means 
a bed of roses. We find him working away in the Industrial Laboratory and 
trying his hand at assaying, agriculture and sanitary chemistr\^; anj-thing, in 
fact, which is needed to polish him and make him a full-fledged chemist. In 
his Senior year, the Chemist also begins the preparation of his Thesis and 
delves around sewers and plumber's shops in order to accomplish his purpose. 
This Thesis is merely meant to show that he has learned something in spite 
of the predictions of the Instructors and Professors to the contrary. 

We have endeavored to show (and we hope we have succeeded) that when a 
man obtains his degree of A. C. and makes his bow to our small college world, 
he goes forth into life's battles fully equipped with an education that will 
entitle him to a place in the front ranks of professional men and enable him to 
make a name for himself and to be a credit to his Alma Mater. 






227 




TROF. MERRl.MAX. 

^he Brcbitcctural Course, 

CHIS department, like an infinitesimal quantit}', may be relatively insig- 
nificant ; yet is often exceedingly in evidence at inopportune moments. 
That it may not be so decidedly apparent when least desirable, it has 
been relegated to a loft with easy exits to the outside world. The 
Lehigh graduate will not have left the old walls without fond recollections of 
that top floor where, in his Freshman year, he was led into deciphering the 
cryptograms of "'My Letter Book." Many bits of valuable information are 
here imparted to the guileless mind, as: "Drawing boards are made of 
wood, and are of different sizes," "Drawing paper may be bought of any 
stationer" (not blacksmith ;. 

Last winter a senes of lectures on the archaeological remains of Egypt was 
announced. 

The Browfi and White Hot being in need of ancient history-, nor wanting 
copy badly, overlooked the occasion, but was soon notified that these excellent 
efforts were at a premium, and if people were to be instructed in the gene- 
alogies of the Pharaohs, and if they would or could not avail themselves of this 
opportunity, then our college journalists must enlighten them. 

It is not a Utopian dream, nor a Grecian myth, that we shall one day ap- 
preciate these efforts of a genius who has an unmeasured capacity for doing 
things to please evervbod}-. So while we wait for things unexpected and im- 
probable, we can thank Fate that here we learned patience ; and is not 
patience a virtue in the Architectural Department ? 






School of General Xitcrature. 

TN the School of General Literature of the University there are three 
courses: First, the Classical Course ; second, the Latin-Scientific course; 
and third, the course in Science and Letters. The second and third 

courses are designed for those men who want a scientific as well as a 
classical education. 

Although there are but few who appreciate the Classical Course, yet it is 
an advantage to that few that the course does not comprise a large number of 
students. One falls directly under the eye of the head of one's department, 
and the instruction is always complete as there is never an opportunity of es- 
caping a recitation, and every one in the class must perform his part of the 
day's lesson. 

Until the second term of the Sophomore year, the studies are almost 
identical with the Technical courses, but from that time the student of the 
classical course, unfettered by the bonds of mathematics and physics, soars 
through the clear atmosphere of philological delight. 

In Greek, we read something of nearly all kinds, and this, when combined 
with Greek Antiquities and History, learned partly from text-books and partly 
from lectures, presents us with a thorough understanding of the Greek life 
and character. Latin claims much of our attention from the earliest part of 
our college course. The student is given reading in large quantities, History 
and Antiquities in no scant measure, and the History of Roman Literature is 
kept as one of the final pleasures. Physiological Psychology is taught in a 
series of most interesting lectures and in the Senior year to this are added 
Constitutional Law and Political Economy. The advanced course in English 
takes much of our time from the beginning of the Junior year; the forms 
under which it appears to us vary from Anglo-Saxon to English Verse, and 
from Chaucer to Philology of English. These studies are made more interest- 
ing and pleasant by a series of lectures by the Professor and Instructors of the 
Department. Logic is taught in the first term Junior, and serves as intro- 
ductorj* work for the reading of more formal logical authors. 

When considered merely from the point of one's enjoyment, the Classical 
Course is the most pleasant, while from the utilitarian standpoint it forms a 
preparation for advanced studies in any direction and a firm basis on which 
more practical, if not more delightful, knowledge may be placed. 



22g 



Seconb Bnnual Banquet. 

Class of '99, 
Sun Inn, April, 1897. 

J- 

Coasts. 

Toastmaster, .... "Scape" Grace. 

Our Class, . "Bob" Farnham. 

The Red Cross Society, "Harry" Palmer. 

The Damn Freshman, ... . " Boyle" Bradenbaugh. 

Athletics of '99, "Rain" Hornor. 

The Ladies, "Colonel" Youtsey 

Lectures in Physics, " Tramp " Pettit. 

" Das Bier, " "Woosy" Knight, 

Perfect Ladies, " Buckey " Knight. 

Society, As I Found It, "Count" Degener 

College Spirit, "Pop" Klein. 

Through Church Windows, " Rastus" Keys 

The Future of '99, ........ "Speed" Visscher 

Committee. 

G. H. Wood, 
P. G. L. Hilken, J. B. Reddig, R. R. Hornor, W. Youtsey. 

Ifirst annual Banquet 

Class of 1900. 

Hotel Allen, Allentown, Wednesday, Nov. 4, 1S96. 

J- 

Eoasts. 

Toastmaster, . . . . H. B. Chapman. 

Greetings from '98 J. R. Farwell. 

Class Politics, W. B. Wood. 

Our Honored Instructors, T. B. Wood. 

Athletics, • W. T. White. 

South Mountain, J. R. Digby. 

The Class of 1900, D. G. McGavock. 

Guests of the evening 

J. R. Farwell, 'q8, T. B. Wood, '98 W. B. Wood, '98. 

Committee. 

W. T. White, 
T. M. Dodson, C. a. Emerson, M. Chamberlain, J. R. Van Duyne. 

230 




IT is not our purpose to give a long or extended history of the Musical 
Organization here at Lehigh, as the subject has been so thoroughly treated 
in former Epitomes. Our Banjo Club, since 1892 when Mr. Pettinos be- 
came leader, has been recognized as one of the best Clubs in the country, 
and as long as we have "Charlie" with us we should be able to uphold our 
reputation in the musical world. 

Unfortunately, the organization of the Banjo and Glee Clubs has been 
delayed until so late in the college year that it will be impossible for many 
concerts to be given this season. The Banjo Club is now having regular re- 
hearsals, and is fast getting in shape for a concert that is to be given here soon 
after Easter. The plan of giving a Commencement Concert is being con- 
sidered, and it is to be hoped that this excellent scheme will be carried out, as 
such a concert will no doubt be a great success, both socially and financially, 
and will add materially to the gayeties of Commencement Week. We hope 
to see the Clubs organized early in the season next year, and an extensive 
concert tour arranged by the management. 



232 




W. A. Megraw, '97, E. D. Hillman, 'gS, 

E. W. Miller, '96, A. O. Knight, '98, 

F. D. Mount, '97, L. S. Leopold, '99. 

M. S. Stockett, 98, F. J. Payne, 1900, 

E. H. Waring, '98. 



aSassos. 



C. P. Nachod, '97, 

B. O. Curtis, "97, 

M. H. Putnam, '97, 

F. N. Kneas, 'c 

B. G. KODJBANOFF, '98, 

H. C. Paddock, '98, 

D. F. B. Shepp, '98, 



T. B. Wood, '98, 

G. R. Jackson, '99, 

V. H. Reid, '99, 

G. L. Robinson, '99, 
J. N. Reese, 1900, 

N. S. Powell, 1900, 

R. W. BouRS, 1900, 



C. M. Simmers, 1900, 



W. T. White, 1900. 



233 




C. E. Pettinos, Pa. 



T, M. Clinton, Md. 



XeaOer. 

Charles E. Pettinos, Pa. 

/Iftanager. 

Frederick C. Wettlaufer, N. Y. 

assistant /nbanager. 

George H. Wood, Pa. 

:©anjeauiines. 

B. H. Jones, Pa. 

Ipiccolo JSanjo. 

J. G. Lehman, Pa. 

Secon& JBanjos. 

L. S. Leopold, Pa. 

JSass JBanjo. 

J. L. Gross, Pa. 



A. Q. Bailey, N. Y. 



J. S. ViEHE, Ind. 



R. F. Sanchez, Cuba. 



/llbaiiOoUns. 

L. H. Marshall, Pa. 



T. Weiss, Pa. 



T. F. Forbes, Ga. 



G. H. Wood, Pa. 



(Suitars. 

E. D. Hillman, Pa. J. B. Lindsey, Jr., Ky. L. E. Edgar, Pa. 

H. B. Hershey, Pa. R. H. Moffitt, Jr., Pa. 

234 



i\^M\B 







©fticers. 

H. H. Seabrook, President. 

F. H. GUNSOLUS, ...... J'ice-F}-esident. 

R. L. Lee, Secretary. 

F. D. Ammen, Treasurer. 

H. T. Irwin, ...... Business Manager. 

E. H. Symington, . . Assistant Business Manager. 
E D. HiLLMAN, Stage Manager. 

G. H. Wood, ...... Musical Director. 

/Ibembers. 

F. D. Ammhn, E. D. Hillman. C. F. Moritz, 

H. L. Bell, F. G. L. Hilken, F. W. Roebling, 

L. E. Edgar, J. C. Holderness, C. F. Scott, 

E. D. Edmonston, H. T. Irwin, H. H. Seabrook, 
R. Farnham, Jr.. G. R. Jackson, B. Smoot, 

R. E. L. George. L. R. Lee, E. H. Symington, 

F. H. Gunsolus, H. I. Magee, W. T. White. 
\V. G. Hare, L. H. Marshall, G. H. Wood, 

W. B. Wood. 



G. R. Booth, 
C. P. Coleman, 
W. W. Coleman, 



IRe^i&ent /iRembeie. 

H. B. C. NiTZE, 
R. R. Hillman, 
F. W. B. Pile, 



W. R. Okeson, 
J. W. Thurston. 



J",6 



^be nDu6tarb anb dhccec pla^. 

Zbc mister. 

At Fountain Hill Opera House, May i, 1897. 

Cast of Cbaracters : 

Mr. Valentine Flipper, Mr. B. Smoot. 

Wilmington Flipper, Mr. H. I. Magee. 

Professor Barton, Mr. H. H. Seabrook. 

Geoffrey Barton, Mr. R. Farnham, Jr. 

Burton, Mr. F. D. Ammen. 

Peter Jones, Mr. W. T. White. 

Adam Quick, Mr. E. D. Edmonston. 

Snorter, Mr. W. G. Hare. 

John, Mr. F. H. Gunsolus. 

Mike, Mr. G. R. Jackson. 

Black, Mr. R. E. L. George. 

Mrs. Flipper, Mr. L. E. Edgar. 

Sadie, Mr. L. R. Lee. 

Mrs. Barton, Mr. F. W. Roebling. 

Agnes, .... Mr. P. G. L Hilken. 

Patsy, Mr. C. F. Moritz. 

Susan, Mr. W. B. Wood. 

Moll, 




237 




Zhc lEpitome. 

University' Annual. First appeared in '75. Until '85 published by the 
Sophomore Class, in that year by the whole University, and since that time by 
the Junior Class. Editorial Board consists of ten men. 



Zbc %ch\Qb 36un\ 

Established in '81. Monthly Magazine. Edited by Board elected from 
the three upper classes. 

J- 

^be Brown ant) Mbitc. 

Established in '94. Semi-weekly newspaper. Edited by Board from the 
three upper classes. 

Senior Claee IBooh, 

Established by the Class of '96. 

238 




CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 




s.^.:^'- 



^be Epitome* 



Published Annually hy the Junior Class. 



36oarC) ot lEDltors. 



John Brown Lindsey, Jr., Ky., 
Charles Edward Webster, Jr., Pa., 
Herbert Myron Daggett, N Y., 
D'Arcy Wentworth Roper, Va., . 



Editor-in-Chief. 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief. 

Business Manager. 

Assistant Business Manager. 



David Castilla, Me.x., 
James Ralph Farwell, X. Y., 
Frank Hammond Gunsolus, la., 



Wentworth Greene Hare, Pa., 
Edward Darling Hillman, Pa., 

Edmund Harrison Symington, Md. 



240 




^^TVi^ C<^~/f(f^i-c<r' 



f^H^A"'''^ 




E&ltors. 

Editor -i7i- Chiefs 

* Harry Layfield Bell, '97, Va., Francis Du Pont Ammen, '97, Md. 

Business Afanager, 

* Charles Francis Scott, '97, N. Y., Charles Schwartze Bowers, '97, Pa. 

Assistant Business Manager^ 
Horatio Francis Brown, '98, Md. 

Associate Editors^ 
Henry Taylor Irwin, '97, Pa., William Bell Wood, '98, Md., 

Auguste Leopold Saltzman, '97, N. Y., Wentworth Greene Hare, '98, Pa., 
Harry Leigh Adams, "98, D. C, John Brown Lindsey, '98, Ky., 

John Read Pettit, 'og. Pa. 

* Resigned. 

242 




Editor-in- Chief, 

Barton O. Curtis, '97, Iowa,* 

John Bovt, '97, Pa. 

Business Manager, 

Columbus W. Thorn, '97, D. C.,* 
William E. Underwood, '97, Pa. 

Assistant Business Manager, 
11. M. Daggett, Jr., '9S, N. V. 



Ralph S. Griswold, '97, N. J., 
John L. Sheppard, Jr., '97, S. C. 
Wallace Treichi.er, '97, Pa., 
James R. Farweli., '98, N. Y., 
George D. Heisey, '98, Pa., 
Harold J. Horn, '98, Pa., 
♦ Resigned. 



John B. Li.ndsey, Jr., '98, Ky., 
Lawrence Wooden, '98, Md. , 
Charles S. Padget, '99, Pa., 
Louis T. Rainey, '99, 111., 
J. Burr Reddig, '99, Pa., 
Theodore C. Visscher, '99, N. Y 



244 




Z o ^ 

'- a o 



=»V 




■J ^ > 

—, . a 

^ — '■" 

5 ci z 



H Z 
> Z 







0i7Auq!?ty, t?dU(]t;ty, 57c^u(]t?1"y , b^l t! 

To t^old Witl? '?u[\) d.f\(\\)i ^n?br(\c^ 
l\)dX lovely t^rppti^q tiiyy Wdi5t 

you r^c\iiy3bo(:K n?e very ^^^^ 



T^tfu^,! Will-itpotdct?y, 

At^dtry to ^t^c^l tj/yjob dwdy 



We fi^d tt?i$ pki? worfo n?ucl? tt^^b^^t ''"''' '" 

Wijci? ^0 09^ ^13^ 15 rour?d About '^' 







But ^Auqi^ty, f?Auq[?ty,r?au(]l?ty b^lt! 
Mybli55rul r9on^e!?t5 Ar^30 F^W 

j\ \{^(M)[}ot ^^Ip but ciyvy you, 

^ OI?c\ppy lucl(y t?d.uc|l;?ty belt" 



^^;. 



9^ r^i) ^«9« 



a Xebiob IRomance. 

ONE moonlight night, when all the world lay wrapt in slumber, Don Miguel 
Ricardo paced the campus of The Lehigh University. A mighty problem 
oppressed his massive brain, a problem not to be solved by calculus. 

He, the descendent of Don Roderick of Granada, had given his Spanish 
heart to a Philadelphia girl. He dared not wed the maiden of his love's young 
dream lest his Spanish Grandee of a father would request him to vamoose the 
the ranch. 

In his father's eyes the bluest blood of Philadelphia was no match for the 
illustrious family of Ricardo. She could only count back to her great-great- 
g r eat-gran df athe r . 

As long as ^liguel remained in Lehigh and the maid paid long and fre- 
quent visits to her Aunt in street, he could bask in the sunshine of her 

smile — but June was near at hand. Unfortunately he had passed his senior 
exams., and the time of separation was rapidly approaching. 

The last time he told her that he loved her was in the conservatory 

at , and she had confessed that she loved him "as a sister," — (the time 

before she had loved him as a friend). 

When Miguel paced the campus and mooned at the moon, he recalled the 
touch of her touching little hand, and those magic words, "I love you as a 
sister." He groaned and struck his darksome brow with his clinched fist. 

" Bv the Alhambra," he ejaculated. "I will call her mine before 
another moon shall shme." 

"To see her is to love her," he murmured, and with the murmur came a 
thought — if his father could only .see her, could only gaze upon those locks of 
gold and those eyes of azure, all would be well. He wired a message that 
night to Mexico: 

"Your son ill ! Come at once ! " 
**** ***** * * 

He came. Miguel did not expect him so soon. In truth, Miguel was at 
the last College Hop sitting for the last time with the maid of his heart. 
"Darling," he whispered, "how do you love me now ? ' " Miguel," she breathed 

rather than said, " I love you as a ." The words were arrested on her 

dewy lips by the sudden expression of stony intensity on Miguel's face. 
Following the direction of his set orbs, she saw a tall Spanish form surmounted: 
bv the Ricardo nose and fierce mustachios. "My father — Ave Maria," ex- 
claimed Miguel. " Leave him to me," she exclaimed with her most Philadel- 
phian air, " Go — get me a glass of water" 

Miguel went Papa Ricardo came ; his dark, flashing eyes roving right and 
left in search of his son. Suddenly his gaze fell upon the slender figure in 

249 



white, standing against a background of orchids. " You !" he cried, and went 
pale. "Twenty years ago when I was here at Lehigh." " Hold !" cried the 
maid. "We know no time in Philadelphia." "Where is Inez?" she asked 
abruptly. 

" I am a widower," said Ricardo, in hollow tones. 
*********** 

When Miguel returned with the glass of water, he was overjoyed to find 
his father and the maid seated amicably on an ottoman under a huge palm. 
Miguel sank on one knee and embraced his Spanish Sire. Mindful of eti- 
quette, the father turned to the maid. " Are you acquainted with my boy ?" 
he asked, politely. 

" I know him well," replied the maid with down-cast eyes. " Already I 
love him as a mother." M. L. 



Jl 



a Ba^ Skate ®n. 

VERY saucy girl, 

A youth, a little bold, 
Were skating hand in hand, 

Unconscious of the cold. 

He squeezed her hand, and from 
This graceful, pretty Miss, 

In quite a spunky way. 
He tried to steal a kiss. 

Alas ! he soon found out 
That there are many slips 

Between a lover and 
A pair of rosy lips. 

When some one asked about 

It, she innocently said : 
' A skate on was the cause 

Of Tom's poor broken head." 



*' there's riDau^ a Slip," lEtc 

Tom wrote his father, he was now 

One step from his degree. 
But they never .skinned a sheep for ///>«, 
His foot had slipped, you see. 

F. D. A. 
250 



"1F301U Soit (Slui nn>al ^ pense." 

A. W., 94. 

CIME rties rapidly in a college town. That is what makes College Widow- 
hood so insidious. The dear Freshman, with the open heart, open purse 
and open mouth, who fills the seats of the grandstand with fair football 
enthusiasts, who makes glad the heart of the avaricious dealer in college 
pins and the diplomatic college photographer, by the aid of diligent grinding 
and expert coaching emerges far too soon from the chrysalis state of his college 
career. The Sophomoric butterfly that flutters forth prefers to sit alone upon 
the top seat of the bleachers, smoke a pipe, and guy the Freshmen. Besides, 
.some one must sit out there in the cold, with his collar turned up and his 
hands in his pockets, and yell himself hoarse for the team, some one with 
college spirit— therefore, he. He attends his class Cotillion with the spirit of a 
man oft'ering up himself a sacrifice to the social obligations of his class. He is 
sceptical of the girl he worshipped the year before, who knew so many of the 
'Varsity players, to say nothing of all the fine points of the games ; who had 
such a fine collection of college pins, and who was ''such an out-and-out 
college girl." Her jests of his verdancy of the year before are gall and worm- 
wood to him, particularly when a Freshman is calling at the same time. He 
is rather jealous of that Freshman, anyhow. How can a girl care for a Soph- 
omore and a Freshman at the same time ^ Will she not from the very nature 
of things either love the one and hate the other or vice versa ? In Junior 
year he rises superior to all girls. His mission is to tear through the garden 
of girlhood, snapping off attachments and crushing hearts ad libituDi. He 
has the traditional role of the blase Junior to sustain, and he flatters himself 
that a moral analysis would show a trace of the roue. She therefore prepares 
to close out his account with her heart, when a pang of remorse or the opera- 
tion of that law by which Satan finds employment for the idle, brings him 
back to her the next year, to while away the few months before graduation. 
Jkleanwhile Providence and the prep, school have brought her solace in a new 
supply of Freshmen. She thinks, "Better two years of an under-clas.sman 
than six months of a Senior," with a future prospect of " a professional posi- 
tion with a large corparation " in any old city, at the princely salary of ten 
dollars a week, and a prodigal supply of good advice from home. So she adds 



his picture to the gallery of the n " men whom I have known "; — the said pict- 
ure being taken in cap and gown as soon as the wearer had passed his 
entrance exams. 

Now the particular Freshman that I have in mind, was fair to look upon — 
his picture adorned the photographer's showcase. He had the sublime self- 
confidence of the man who has never tackled integral calculus. He thought 
he could say to himself, in all modesty, that he had made quite an impression 
upon the particular girl in question. So he repeated a joke from L/fe, at the 
end of a very gratifying call, so as to make a sort of grand stand finish. He 
took her extended hand at parting, and gave it a little squeeze — he was very 
bold since the class supper. He fancied the pressure was reciprocated just a 
little while she strove to sulfuse her countenance with a blush. At that moment 
he felt her shudder slightly, and then there was the sound of a metallic click 
upon the floor. The blush suffused rapidly. He stooped from curiosity, dis- 
covered with embarrassment, hesitated — from inexperience perhaps — and 
then quickly and avariciously put something in his vest. 

" Give it to me," she said with a gasp. 

"I couldn't do that very well," he replied with considerable embarrass- 
ment and perspiration. " I shouldn't dare call your attention to it by returning 
it. I think that would be indelicate. And then, it means so much to me. I 
prize anything of yours so highly. I have a glove, a handkerchief, part of a 
bracelet, a rose you wore once, and a side comb. If I could only keep this I 
There's an old French motto that fits the case exactly — I don't remember it 
because I take German — hang it all ! '' 

Then he rushed out into the night. She stared at the rug as though she 
considered it particeps crimtnis, and after a while she went over to the pictures 
of the men she had known, and separated his from the rest as though she were 
dividing the goats from the lambs. But the Fseshman ran on with one hand 
pressed tightly to his breast. When he reached a street lamp he stopped, and 
lest someone might see it, he made a shield with his coat and hat, and feasted 
his eyes upon the stolen goods. He whistled right merrily, and in the exuber- 
ance of his spirits was almost run in by a cop whom he had slapped upon the 
back. 

In the days that followed it was easy to see that there was something upon 
his mind. He exhibited all the symptoms of acute dementia. Finally, when 
he could contain the awful secret no longer, he went to his social sponsor, the 
Junior, and told him all in inviolable confidence, of course. The Junior put 
aside a half-read French novel, with a yellow ochre cover, and said, with fine 
sarcasm : 

' ' What more do you want ? " 

" It isn't that, old man, " the other replied, ''I haven't the ner\-e to go 

252 



back, and I want to. You have had a lot of experience in affairs of this kind 
and I thought you would help me." 

The Junior looked wise and thought hard. He leaned back and put his 
feet on the table. 

"You must send it back." 

Verily, the Freshman's cup was running over. The Junior opened the 
drawer of the table and took from it an empty bon-bon box and a blank card. 
Upon the card he wrote the lines of the immortal bard : 
" 'Tis better to have loved and lost 
Than never to have loved at all." 

" Where is it ? " he said. 

The Freshman produced it from some part of his anatomy. The other 
surveyed it with the air of a connoisseur. He put it and the card in the box 
and handed them to the Freshman. 

" Send the box to her." 

The Freshman's face assumed the sweetly resigned look of the ancient 
who consulted the oracle and was told to give all his goods to the poor; but 
the Junior went back to his French novel. 

A few days later the Freshman came to the Junior and joy was pictured 
on every feature. 

" Well, old man, you are pretty smooth and you do know girls; there's no 
use talking. She has sent it back, and the card too, with something on the 
back — read it." 

The Junior flipped his cigarette into the corner, took up the card languidly 
and read: 

" 'Tis better to have lost and loved 
Than never to have lost at all." 
Then he looked at the box again. 

"The fashion in colors changes in two years," he murmured reminiscently. 

"What's that ? " asked the Freshman. 

" I say, what are you going to do with it ? " replied the Junior. 

'' Oh, I don't know," the other went on cheerily, " but I can go back there 
now, thanks to you; I believe I should be welcome, too.'' 

" Yes, go back," said the Junior quite slowly ; '' go somewhere — go up in 
the library and bone mediaeval history. Close the door as you go out." 

And when alone he soliloquized : "Accident — must have been — accidents 
will happen, particularly first-term Freshman, strange coincidence, though ; 
clever girl, too, didn't think .she had it in her — almost as clever as I am ; why 
didn't I think of that before ? I'll go to see her again, anyhow ; wonder if she 
recognized my handwriting." 

Then he filled his pipe, rammed in the charge and lighted it with a faculty 
summons. 

253 



a riD. JS:e IDerse. 




The bust engraved upon this page 
Is by the artist of the age. 
The famous sculptor does portray 
A famous man in fitting way. 

Never before has this been done — 
A bust been made of any one 
Before he honored meets his doom, 
And lies decaying in his tomb. 

No man possessed of any wit 
Should wonder at this thing a bit; 
If he'll but think, if think he can, 
He'll find this is no common man. 

From pole to pole, if so you please. 
Search the continents and the seas. 
Egad ! what spot in the universe 
Does prototype of this traverse ? 

Then let all men twice in each hour 
Before these stern set features cower 
And let them softly, humbly sing. 
As they do homage to their king. 



ins. 

A ship sails from Boston. Height 
is A ; breadth, B ; the ship's weight is 
W. It sails with a velocity V miles 
per hour. (i). Where is the ship 
going ? (2). What is the captain s 
name ? (3). How long will it take the 
ship to make the trip ? 

A hare runs with a velocity of V 
miles per year. Every time he leaps 
he moves his center of gravity two 
feet up in the air and four feet along 
the earth. He comes to a white- 
washed plank fence whose height is 
A. (i). What will the hare do ? (2). 



How long a shadow will the fence 
cast at sunset ? 



^ 



Prof. 



{/o Senior Civil s in 

Masonry Walls and Dams). — "Gentle- 
men, I've just looked over a few 
papers, and I see that none of you 
know very much about that dam — 
problem." 



-"There's a man down 
a wooden leg named 



Servant. - 
stairs with 
Smith." 

Master. — " Go right down and^find 
out the name of his other leg." 



254 



Zoo nn^ucb XTeleoram. 



jt 



5)ramatt6 ipcreona:. 



Lawrence Wilkins, 

Robert Brooke, 

Jack Hazard, 

The Objectionable Mr. Lewis, 

Miss Edith Leslie, 

Mary, .... 



Enamored of Miss Leslie. 

A " Fiend." 

A Friend in Need. 

. A Rival. 

A Betlilehem Divinity. 

Her Maid. 



Scene , 
Time : 



Bethlehem. 
The present. 



Scene IT. 

Room in Fraternity House, occupied by Messrs. Wilkins and Brooke. 

Brooke is grinding away at Calculus and Wilkins and Jack Hazard are 
engaged in an earnest conversation. 

Wilkins {to Hazard) : "You see, the fact is, Jack, there's this fool of a 
Lewis dangling around — a man without the sense he was born with — and yet, 
by George! he's there every time I call, and she seems to encourage him — 
well, a good deal more than she does me I don't make any sort of headway. " 

Hazard : "I tell you what it is, Lawrence, my boy, you don't under- 
stand women. They must be worked on through their sympathies. Now, I 
know a girl who married a man for no other reason than because she was sorry 
for him. She " 

Wilkins : " Oh, hang their sympathies! I don't believe Edith Leslie has 
any. She isn't that kind of girl. 

Hazard : ' ' How do you know ? Have you ever tried ? " 

Wilkins: "Tried what? Working on her .sj^mpathies ? Haven't I, 

though ! Why, only last term when flunked me in math. I worked on 

them for all I was worth, told her how hard it was for me to study when other 
chaps were having a good time, and how I wasn't the kind of fellow who could 
give up everything to books. And she said — she said " 

Hazard {encouragingly): "Yes?" 

Wilkins {reflectively): "Well, as far as I can remember, she said she 
didn't know which she despised most, fools who couldn't learn, or fools who 
could, but thought it smart not to." 

Hazard : " Now I just tell you what, old fellow, you haven't gone about 
this in the right way. That flunk dodge is as old as the hills, and there isn't 



255 



an up-to-date college girl in the land who is going to marry a man because he's 
flunked his math. What you want to bank on is something out of the way — 
something — er — heart-rending, you know, that's going to work on her feelings 
before she knows it. Then, when the iron's hot, strike, and she s yours. Oh, 
I know women, Lawrence, and " 

WiLKiNs {irritably) : "Oh, yes; j'ou know women and so do I. But, how on 
eart'n am I to work on their feelings ? I don't squint ; I'm not hump-backed ; 
the governor lets me have all the tin I want. I haven't a trouble to my name. 
There's that confounded Lewis, now, has something the matter with his con- 
founded heart, and he works it for all it's worth, I'd be willing to wager." 

H.A.Z.A.RD {impressively): ''Lawrence, have you ever thought what it 
would mean to lose a mother ? " 

"WiLKiNs : " Lose a I Why, what the deuce, man ? You don't sup- 
pose I'm going to commit murder in order to work on Miss Leslie's sympathies, 
do you ? " 

Hazard: "Not exactly; but now, just for a moment, imagine Miss 
Leslie's emotions on hearing of your mother's death. She would feel un- 
commonly sorry, — extremely sympathetic, wouldn't she ? " 

WiLKiNS : ''She might, indeed. Gad ! Zeus ! I feel sorry for myself at 
the very thought of it." 

Hazard : "Just so. Now, my boy, I have a scheme that's going to place 
me side by side with Machiavelli, Sherlock Holmes, and the Catiline conspir- 
ators. It is this : Let the news of a death in your family be brought to you 
by a telegram while you are calling on Miss Leslie. Let her see that her 
sympathy, in what she will of course suppose a bona fide bereavement, is 
everything in the world to you. Propose to her then and there, and you'll be 
accepted on the spot.'' 

WiLKi.Ns: " Yes. and what then ? Don't you suppose she'd find out within 
another half-hour that the whole affair was a put-up job ? Much good my en- 
gagement would do me after she'd gotten to the bottom of that telegram " 

Hazard: "Lawrence, you would never do for a conspirator; you've no 
imagination. Of course, after you had settled matters satisfactorily with Miss 
Leslie, another telegram would have to appear upon the scene saying that the 
first telegram was all a mistake — your mother not dead at all, but suffering 
from a slight attack of measles or — or — appendicitis." 

WiLKiNS: " Yes, that would have such a likely sound. I tell you what, 
Jack, I don't half like this idea of working on people's sympathies, it's so — so 
infernally dishonest, — so" 

Hazard: " Infernally nothing I All you've got to do is to read a telegram 
and to appear overcome. There's nothing dishonest about that. Come along 
now and we'll arrange matters so there'll be no mistake.'' 

WiLKiNs: "But its such a beastlv cold-blooded sort of arrangement. 
I" 

Hazard: " Oh. come on, come on ! Good-bj-e, old Brooke. Hope j-ou'U 
knock a ten to-morrow." 

{Exeunt Hazard a?id Wilkins.) 

Brooke: " Hal hal So j-ou're going to work on Miss Leslie's sympathies, 
are you ? {Chuckles.) And you're going to send yourself a telegram, are you ? 
Ha! ha! ho! ho! my amiable young Sherlock Holmes, sending telegrams is a 
game two can play at, and I'll put a spoke in that wheel, and a stop to this 
infernal love-making as sure as my name is Bob Brooke." 

Curtain. 
256 



Scene 1I1I. 

Miss Edith Leslie's drawing room. Enter Lawrence Wilkins, shown in by 
Mary. 

Mary: " Miss Leslie says as you're to wait here, sir. She'll be down in a 
few minutes." 

Wilkins: " Oh, very well ; do you know whether Miss Leslie is expecting 
any callers this afternoon ? [aside.) That jackass, Lewis, 1 bet." 

Mary: " I don't know, sir {reflecting). I think, sir, as Mr. Lewis may 
be calling; he most always is of an afternoon. (Wilkins is here heard to 
murmur words unfit for publication. ) Was you wanting to see him sir ? " 

Wilkins: " Damn him \ Er— er— that is — er— not exactly, damn him, you 
know. I beg your pardon, but this— er— huskiness in my throat {coughs 
violently). No Mary— your name is Mary, is it not ? I did not want to see 
Mr. Lewis this afternoon-. The fact is I should be yery " {bell rings). _ 

Mary: " There's the bell ; I must go now, sir. I guess it's Mr. Lewis." 
{She curtsevs and withdraws. Wilkins goes to the window.) 

Wilkin's : ' ' That's ]ust who it is, confound him What on earth a wornan 
can see to admire in a man who neyer goes anywhere without an everlasting 
flower in his buttonhole, and who is far and away the biggest ass in town, is 
more than I can make out." 

{Enter Mr. Leiuis. an extremely correct individual of about forty- 
five. He walks towards the mirror, whei-e he spends some time in adjust- 
ing his mustache, unconscious of the presence of Wilkins. who. half -hidden 
behind the window draperies, is for some minutes a witness to the Prepara- 
tions of his rival. Finally Mr. Lezuis. catching a glimpse of him m the 
glass, starts perceptibly ) 

Mr. Lewis 'embarrassed): "Oh! you there, Mr. Wilkins?" 

Wilkins: lemen^-in^) " Don't let me disturb you. Mr. Liwis; keep right 
on, I beg of you. (Cuttingly.) Or perhaps you would rather I stood in the hall, 
or went into the next room until you have finished ? "' 

Mr. Lewis: "Not at all, not at all. Mr. Wilkins. I— er— did not know any 
one was here. One always likes to give the finishing touches, you know. Ha ! 

ha! " , AT T • 

Wilkins {with ill-concealed contempt): 'No, I do not know, Mr. Lewis. 

Mr. Lewis (indulgently): '^Oh, welll you college men naturally 
wouldn't be expected to. I remember having quite those ideas myself when I 
was your age. But a man at college and a man of the world are two vers' dif- 
ferent persons, let me tell you. When a man leaves his college and becomes 
a member of society- aw— in short a man of the world— he is forced to pay 
attention to little details of dress and manner— matters which before then have 
been very properly out of his sphere. A man of the world, Mr. Wilkins, must 
adapt himself to 'the caprices of the feminine mind, and he can do so no 

more effectively than {Enter Miss Leslie) Aw— good afternoon. Miss 

Lsslic ' '^ 

Miss Leslie: "How do you do, Mr. Lewis? How do you do, Mr. 
Wilkins ? I have not seen you for ages. Come, sit down, and tell me how the 
world IS treating you." (She motions, presumably Wilkins, to a seat beside 
her on the divait, but Mr. Lewis is beforehand, aftd seats himself com- 
placently). 

Wil'kins {aside) : " Bah !" 

Mr. Lewis : " I was just explaining to Mr. Wilkins. here, how a man situ- 



ated as he is, finds all his interests necessarily in the college life. It is only 
after one leaves college that one is able to devote all one's thoughts to the fair 

' WiLKiNS {asuie) : " Blasted fool ! " 

Miss L. : " Do you devote all your thoughts to the fair sex, Mr. Lewis ?" 

Mr. Lewis : "To some of them, I do, Miss Leslie." 

WiLKms (aszWe): "Jackass!" 

Miss L. : " Bravo 1 bravo ! you shall have a cup of tea for that." {htiter 
Mary with tea tray). " And here it is now. Set it down, Mary. Now, Mr. 
Lewis, how do you take yours ? Let me see if I remember— two lumps and 
cream— is that right ? ' 

Mr. Lewis : " Quite right, Miss Leslie; you have a remarkable memory." 

Miss L. {givnii^ citp): "Where my friends are concerned, Mr. Lewis. 
Mr. Wilkins, vour's'is sugar without cream, I beheve ? ' 

WiLKiNs '{with emphasis) : " No sugar, Miss Leslie." 

Miss L. : " What I have I made a mistake ? You see what flattery will do, 
Mr. Lewis ? ( To Wilki7is. ) Oh 1 but j-ou really ought to take sugar ; you 
need it, Mr. Wilkins, indeed you do." 

{Enter Mar v.) 

Mary : " He're's a telegram for Mr. Wilkins, Miss Leslie." 

Miss L : "Why, how funny! how did they happen to send it here •> " 

Mary: "The boy said he was after taking it to Mr. Wilkins' house, and a 
young gent told him' as Mr. Wilkins was here calling, and as it was important 
he'd better bring it round." 

Miss L. : " Very well. {Exit Mary. ) No bad news, I hope, Mr. Wilkms." 

W^iLKiNs {tearing open telegram): " I trust not. {Aside.) Lord, what 
an infernal liar I am"! {Aloud.) Gracious Heaven ! ! " 

Miss L. : " Oh ! what is the matter ? " 

Wilkins : " I cannot believe it; it is too sudden." {Appears overcome, 
and sinks into chair.) " There ! read for yourself." 

Miss L. {reading telegram) : 
''Your Aunt Sarah died this morning. Come home at once. 

Your Father." 

"Oh! I am too, too sorry ; you poor poor fellow." 

Mr. Lewis : " Upon my word, that's really too bad, you know. Uncom- 
monly shocking sort of news to get in a telegram ! Deuced awkward things 
telegrams, anyway. Aw — Miss Leslie, think Fd better be going now. Don't 
care to intrude on' a fellow's grief, don't j^ou know." 

Miss L. : "Yes, yes I I think it would be best. Good-bye Mr. Lewis. 
{E-rit Mr. Lewis.) I cannot tell you how distressed I am. Mr. Wilkins, were 
you VERY fond of your aunt ? " 

Wilkins : " Fond does not express it, Miss Leslie, I worshipped her; but I 
need not say how it comforts me to know that you sympathize with me ; it 
lessens the— the crushing affliction, Miss Leslie, indeed it does." 

Miss. L. : " Sympathize with you ! Of course 1 do; how could anyone help 

it?" 

Wilkins {ardently) : "But you would not want to help it, would you,- 
when you know your sympathy 'is the dearest thing in the world to me? 
Edith -I may call you so, may I not ?— can you not give me a little love as 
well as " {Enter, Lewis. ) 

Mr. Lewis : "Aw, aw, I beg your pardon, but a boy was just bringing 

2;S 



this up the steps as I left, and I thought perhaps I might be able to— er— do 
something, you know." 

WiLKiNs (asidf) : "Yes, you pretty effectually did do somethmg, you 

know. ' 

Miss L. : " Another telegram ! Open it quickly, Mr. Wilkms, perhaps your 
aunt isn't dead after all." 

WiLKi.NS : "Ah ! no such good news, I fear. {Aside.) What the devil does 
this mean, I'd like to know. I didn't bargain for two of these." {Opens tele- 
grain. ) 

Miss L. : "O, I can tell by your face it is some dreadful news. Please, 
PLEASE don t keep me in suspense " 

WiLKiNs {recovering himself with an effort): "It is, indeed, dreadful 
news, but I will not burden you with my sorrows. Miss Leslie; I must learn to 
bear them alone." 

Miss L. : -'You must do no such thing. I insist upon knowing the con- 
tents of that telegram, ^Nlr. Wilkins. There, good-bye, Mr. Lewis, no you can't 
do a thing, can he ? " 

Wilkins {in a sepulchral tone): 'No, I thank you; you have done every- 
thing that you possibly could. {Exit Mr. Lewis.) And do you really 
insist upon hearing this ? " 

Miss L.: "I do. indeed." 

Wilkins: "Very well, t\\Qn,'' {reads, bracing himself): 

"Your father passed away at nine a. m. — small-i'ox. 

Your Sorrowing Mother." 

{Aside) " Confound that Hazard 1 He might have let it go at the aunt." 

Miss L. {excitedly): " Your father dead ! And you can read about it in 
that voice ? {Aside ) The effect of the shock, I suppose. I've often heard 
that some people are quite stunned at first. {Advancing timidly ^ Mr. 
Wilkins — Lawrence — don't look like that ; try, try to bear it." 

Wilkins (vacantly): "Yes, yes; I must try." 

Mi'-s L. {half crying): "Oh I it is too, too terrible !" 

Wilkins {aside) : " Gad I this is getting past a joke. I suppose this is that 
confounded Hazard's idea of working on people's sympathy. {Crosses ta 
Edith; aloud) Edith, my dearest'' 

Miss L. : " First an aunt, and then a father ! Oh ! oh ! " 

Wilkins {aside) : " I wish I had that infernal fool here ; I'd teach him to 
kill off a family wholesale. (Aloud.) My darling, can you not realize that 
so long as I have your .sympathy — your — your love, I am strong enough to bear 
any sorrow; glad enough to bear it, if you can give me that love. Edith, can 
you ? Will you ? " 

Miss L. ' (still in tears) : " I— I— don't know. I — I'll try, Lawrence, but,, 
oh ! (breaking down), it is too horrible ; I cannot believe it." 

Wilkins: " Believe what, my dearest ?" 

Miss L. : " O that dreadful, dreadful telegram !'" 

Wri.Kixs: " Well, don't beUeve it thea, — er — er — at any rate don't let's 
think of it— that is, not exactly think of it. but try not to let it make you un- 
happy, sweetheart. {Heroically),! — I can bear it." {Bell rings.) 

Miss L.: "Yes, but v-u are so strong and I am so weak. Just think, 
Lawrence, vour poor, poor father must have died ver\' soon after he had tele- 
graphed you of your Aunt's death How terribly sudden small-pox is I" 

(Enter Hazard quickly.) 

259 



Hazard: '• Forgive this sudden intrusion. Miss Leslie, but the fact is, I'm 
afraid 1 have some bad news for Wilkins. Old fellow I'm afraid " 

WiLKiNs (/« an ag07iized aside): "You don't mean to say you have 
another telegram, Jack ? For heaven's sake, keep it dark, or I'm a ruined man. 
"What in the devil's name do you mean, anyhow, by deluging me in this in- 
fernal manner ? I feel as though I'd swallowed the obituary column in a Sun- 
day paper." 

Miss L. : " He is telling you to keep something from me, Mr. Hazard. I 
know he is, and Lawrence it is very mean of you, too, when you know how 
anxious I am. {Aside to Hazard.) It is only about the funeral arrangements." 

Hazard {aghast): "Funeral arrangements! 1" 

Miss L. : " Oh ! you don't know what fearful news the poor boy has had I 
You tell Mr. Hazard, Lawrence, while I find out what the telegram says."' 

{She takes the telegram Jrom Hazard's resistless hand and proceeds to open it.) 

"\A"iLKiNS {aside to Hazard): "You've done for me now. I hope you're 
satisfied." 

Hazard: " Do you mean to say this isn't your first telegram ?" 

"WiLKixs {with the cal7nness of despair): ''This is the third member of 
my famih- to expire within an hour.'' 

Hazard: "Good Lord 1" 

Miss L. : {dazed, readijig): 

"Your SAINTED mother passed into Eternal rest at ten thirty a.m. 
requiescat in pace. Your Bereaved Father." 

."Ten-thirty a. m. — Your bereaved father ! — I — I don't quite under- 
stand. Lawrence, Mr. Hazard, what does it all mean ? '" 

"^''ilkins: " It means, dearest, that I have made an awful ass of myself, 
and that a contemptible trick has been played on you. I " 

Miss L. : "A trick on me ?"' 

"Wilkins: " Yes, Hazard thought — I thought— that if we could — er — er" 

Hazard: " Could work on your sympathies, you know, you might come 
to— to '• 

"Wilkins : " To — to sympathize with me. Do you understand ?" 

Miss L. : "Yes, I think I understand, and now that you two gentlemen 
bave been so successful in your praise-worthy endeavors to work on my sym- 
pathies, you will, I am sure, excuse me when I wish you both a very good- 
aftemoon '' 

Hazard: " Miss Leslie, I humbly apologize for this afternoon's perform- 
ance ; I assure 3'ou it was my fault — everv bit of it. {Aside to Wilkins.) I 
smell Bob Brooke at the bottom of this and if I don't knock his infernal head 
into a cocked hat my name's not Hazard" (He bows to Miss Leslie and 
leaves.) 

Wilkins : "Edith, you cannot be serious! You know that I love you; 
you have let me think you cared a little for me ; you would not let a joke — 
foolish and ill-timed though it be — come between us now ? " 

Miss L. (tearing telegram to pieces and I ft ting them fall to the floor): 
" My love for you lies there — with those scraps of paper, do you see ? Now, 

go" 

Wilkins: " Do you mean this? " 

Miss L. : " Go." 

{Exit Wilkins. Miss Leslie starts toward the door as if to call him 
iack, but turjis au<ay irresolute. She catches sight of the telegram lying at 

260 



her feet ^ and, kneeling doion, mechanically gathers the pieces^ otic by one. 
As she is thus engaged, IVilkins e titers softly, and stands for a moment 
watching her, before he speaks.) 

WiLKiNS: " Edith! what are you doing there ? " 

Miss L. {rising from her knees) : "N-nothing." 

Wilkin s: " What are you hiding in your hand ? " 

Miss L. : "The t-telegram. I said my love for you lay with the p-p- 
pieces, and " - — 

Wii.KiNs: "Yes?" 

Miss L. (placing telegram in her bosom): " A-a-and I wanted to-to-put 
them in the right p-place." 



WiLKiNs: "My Darling I 



Curtain. 



^ 



a 1R0VCL 

Vol I. 

A winning wile, 

A sunny smile, 

Fine weather; 

A tiny walk. 

A pleasant talk 
Together. 

Vol. II. 
A little doubt, 

A playful pout, 
Capricious ; 

A merry Miss, 

A stolen kiss — 
Delicious. 

Vol. III. 

You ask mamma, 
Consult papa, 

With pleasure; 

And both repent 

This rash event 
At leisure. 

261 




GbapeL 



The clanging of the chapel bells, 
To me the hour of morning tells ; 

■ I is half-past ten, 

I start, and then 
Turn over for another nap, 
As the bell sounds out its last dull tap. 
****** 

I stand outside the chapel door ; 
Along the aisle I move once more. 

In wonder bound 

I gaze around ; 
No half-filled seats do I behold 
With fellows dozing, as of old. 



Sweet college girls are every where. 
And many fellows, too, are there. 

In great surprise, 

I rub my eyes 
To see if I am by some chance 
Asleep, or drunk, or in a trance. 

In all the old familiar places 

I only See strange, foreign faces. 

O, gladsome sight I 

Can I be right ? 
Tis Jim who's standing by the door, 
Jim, same old Jim, Id known of yore. 



Explain what means this wondrous scene ! 
Jim gazed at nie with solemn mien. 

What do you say 

In answer, pray ? 
But ne'er did Jim an answer make, 
For now I find mvself awake. 



262 




^be poster (5irL 

Oh what is it we see on every hand. 

In each and every paper in the land, 

That is a drug at everj- paper stand ? 

The Poster Girl. 

So gay, and bright, she mocks the sun's last rays; 
A seeming strange fantastic whirl and maze 
Of draperies that dazzle all who gaze. 
The Poster Girl. 



He had been out the night before, 
He took his monthly quiz ; 

For his dear sake I blush to state, 
He had been full of " fizz." 

He tried in vain to rightly draw 

The logarithmic spiral. 
Alas ! such curve was never traced 

By point with motion gyral. 

His tutor read his paper o'er. 
And a shock he really felt, sir: 

This man had found six asymptotes 
For a curve called Bromo Seltzer! 
F. D. A. 

263 



H (5^m. Shower. 



Scene : Shower baths at the gym. 

Time : Any afternoon after football practice. 

{About three-fourths of the team inside trying to make the shower-baths ivork, 
and swearitig because they caii't). 

"Mike" (outside): "Hurry up, fellows, and get that thing in working 
order." 

" Dick ": " Say, Van, you"ve monkeyed with that thing long enough, let me 
try {grabs hold of the hot 'water faucet, and begins to tivist ; shower-bath lets out 
about fourteen gallons of hot water at the temperature of 2jo'^ Centigrade.) 

Chorus of Boiled Football Players: "?? — *** :; ; — ? — :: 

" Mike " {still on outside): " Say, hurry up, it's getting late, and you fellows 
are wasting time, acting like a lot of babies." 

"Dick ": " Well, d it, why don't you come in and fool with this darn 

old rain machine ? " 

•'Tack " {loftily) : " Here, let me work this thing, you don't know anything 
about it."' {Turns off hot water and tivists cold water faticet, shower bath; pretends 
it^s the N^ortk Pole, attd plays freeze-out). 

"Tempus"(?« a cortter, with his teeth working like a Wall Street ticker): "I 
s — s — say J — Ja — Jack for th — th — the 1 — 1 — love of h — heaven, g — g — gi — give 
us s — s — some hot n — now." 

" Jack '' turns on the hot water, but it does'nt come because some darn fool 
downstairs has turned it off, so they all .stand around and swear at each other 
and wait for it. Finally it does come in the form of a cloud-burst; then there's 
a fine chorus rendered by the whole team, supplemented by some magnificent 
individual work in the line of profanity. 

" Burke": " Jack, get away from that thing and let some man who knows 
something about water, work it. I'm getting tired of being boiled, frozen, 
thawed out, and re-boiled." 

"Jack": " 7?*** ; ;?? ; " 

'' Burke ": " Ditto, ditto, ditto." 

" Chuck" {curled up in the window): "I say, fellows, you really oughtn't to 
swear so " 

Voice from Crowd : "Oh, shut up, ' Chuck'; if old Parkhurst monkeyed 
with this thing for five minutes he'd discount any pirate that ever lived." 

264 



" Jack " {sotto voice): " * * ! ! ! this sprinkling can.' 

"Mike" {still on outside): "Shut up Jack ! say, can any of you fellows 
manipulate these water works ?' ' 

Freshman: "I think I can." {He goes inside followed by cries of " Good eye 
Freshie,'^ " IVatch the Freshie," etc. He does succeed in regulating the sho7vers, and 
comes out feeling quite proud of himself , but he does not know that his success 7uas: 
due to that darn fooVs having stopped using the water down stairs.) 



Jfc 



Some a^vicc. 



HE rising wind moans low outside, 
And I wake from dreams so dear, 
Of peaceful bygone Freshman days. 
When I first entered here. 



II. 



My first impressions of the place — 
Those sad, sad days of Fall — 

I thought the Profs, quite fossilized, 
And that I knew it all. 

III. 

At Christmas time exams, came on, 

And then I found my level, 
I flunked most all, and wished they were 

In hell, long with the devil. 

IV. 

At last a Senior wise am I, 

And to Fre-shmen who would boast, 
Give I this bit of sound advice — 

This place is not a roast. 

265 



Hnnals. 



-Lehigh wins debate from Lafayette. 

-Lehigh gets Lacrosse Championship. 

-Date for the appearance of the '97 Epitome. 

-'97 Epitome about to come out. 

-'97 Epitome still coming out. 

-'97 Epitome appears. 

-'98 secures sweet vengeance. 

-Summer vSchool of Surveying begins. 

-Topographic Map completed of Central Park, Rittersville. 

-College opens ; Fossil missing ; another wonder, compulsory chapel 

abolished; a very fre.sh class, 1900, is introduced to college by '98. 
-" Cappy " Forbes flunks his twelfth Hygiene Re. 
-" Chimmie " takes football team to Detroit. 
-Chimmie throws up the job. 
-Mechanicals say they are affected with a " Danse " worse than the 

St. Vitus. 
-" Freddie " lectures on the Pyramids. 
-" Freddie" lectures on the Egyptian Monuments. 

-Lafayette makes some strict eligibility rules to go into effect in the 

year 2000. 
Feb. 3. — ''Cappy" Forbes passes Hygiene and suffers from an attack of 

nervous prostration. 
Feb. 13. — " Red Cross Society " flourishes at Lehigh. 
Mar. I. — Mr. Brooks deigns to explain a problem in Railroad Engineering 

(he is not successful). 
Mar. 3. — President Cramer of the Gun Club hits a pigeon. 
Mar. 6. — College Meeting; "Chimmie" gives a few points on college 

" spirits." 
April 8. — " Spinny" becomes weary of the joys of single life. 
April 10. — '98 Epitome goes to press. 



266 



May 


8. 


May 


23. 


June 


I. 


June 


2, 


June 


3. 


June 


4. 


June 


13. 


June 


23. 


My 


17 


Sept. 


14 


Sept. 


30. 


Oct. 


29. 


Oct. 


30. 


Nov. 


5. 


Dec. 


t2 


Dec. 


18, 


1897. 


Jan. 


10. 



H (Toininon Eyperience. 

Scene — The Library. 

Busy Student {to library ''Kid" ): " Will you please let me have the Phila- 
delphia Ledger ?"' 

Library " Kid " {after turning leisurely around in his chair, and taking a sur- 
vey of the morning papers): '"Taint here. Mr. Sterner {chief cataloguer) is down 
stairs reading it, but he will be through in about three hours. I reckon you 
can get it at about twelve." 

B. S.: "Oh, don't hurry his lordship up ! You might put him to some 
exertion, and make him have nervous prostration. What papers are in ? " 

L. K. : '' Liebeg's Annalen des Cheviie, Verhandlungen des Vereins zur Befor- 
derung des Gewerbfleiszes, Zeitschrift fiir Vergleichende Sprachf arse hung, and 
ALineralogische." 

B. S. {interrupting ''Kid''): " No, thanks; 1 read all those last week. Give 

me Life." 

{ lust at this moment there is a sound of loud talking that seems to come from the 

other side of the library.) 

Mr. Stauffer {emerging from one of the alcoves in a very bad humor, as he has 
been aroused from a sound slumber by the disturbance): " Ghentlemen ! ghentlemen ! 
this noise must stop; we can have no talking in this room. You disturb the 
peace and quiet of everyone." 

{The talking subsides to whispering.) 

Mr. S {to "Kid") : " Rhun down and have my lunch sent up at once 

alretty." 

{The ''Kid" departs, and in about five minutes Prof comes in the library, 

and enters alcoves, while Mr. Stauffer at once commences to busily straighten out a pile 
of papers and magazines on the desk.) 

Prof. : " Mr. StauflEer, where is the boy ?" 

Mr. Stauffer {with a greatly puzzled expression on his face, looks inquiringly 
around the library): "Veil, he vas here just a moment ago, but he seems to be 
out now. I suppose he must have run avay somewhere, as he is always doing." 

(^Prof ^^^ets a book, and leaves; and Mr. .Stauffer again falls into a gentle 

doze, while Mr. Sterner, chief cataloguer, is still buried in the Philadelphia Ledger 
down stairs.) 



267 



H ^c\K> Mell-lktiown Books. 



The House Across the Way," 
'Vanity Fair," 

God's Fool," 

Leaves of Grass," 

Dutchman's Fireside," 

The Last of the Barons," 

The Gold Bug,'' . 

The Light of Asia," 

Oar Mutual Friend," 
' The Seats of the Mighty," 
'The Heavenly Twins, " 
' The Angelic Woman," 

Castle Nowhere," . 
'' A London Life, " 
'The Little School Master,'" 

■ Won by Waiting," 

All Sorts and Conditions of Men, 
' Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow, 
' My Love Affairs," 
' The Keeper of the Keys," 
' The Light That Failed," . 

■ A Mere Child," 

' The Nameless Man," 
' Degeneration," 
' Ancient History,'' 
' Last of the Mohicans" 
' jVe7a York Journal," 
' Greek History," 



"Charlie's." 

College Life. 

PiEZ, '99. 

1900. 

South Bethlehem. 

"Count" Finkh, '97. 

... . . Levi. 

. Vasharia\',I90o. 

. Chas. Rennig. 

Faculty Room. 

Brice Brothers. 

Megraw, '97. 

Mechanical Lab. 

Digby, 1900. 

Mr. Biggin. 

. Metallurgy Re's. 

Freshman Class. 

Burr Editor. 

Barton, 97. 

"Jim" Myers. 

. Becerra, '97, '98, '99. 

. YORKS, '98. 

Toros Kurk Yasharian. 

. '99. 

Smith, '97; Wilcox, '99; McVeigh, 1900. 

. Luten, '99. 

The Brown and White. 

Kodjbanoff. 



268 



answers to Covresponbcnts. 

Lu-EN :— You have an erroneous idea of the term. Blue grass comes from 
the Chocktaw, "Cloptoamnie," which means "Heap much fire water, heap 
fight." To your other inquiry we might say yes, young calves can be easily 
raised on the bottle. 

Ko-FF —Yes, you do use exceptionally bad English. The best thing you 
can do is to think twice before speaking. If this will not cure you, you had 
better take the course in English at the University. 

BE-RRA-.-Your case is a very difficult one. Probably the best thing you 
can do under the circumstances is to ask for a year's furlough. 

Mr. St-ner:— Yes, der Pennsylvania Dutch habt gesendet fromt Wilhelm 
der Conqueror und daher ihr lineage is nicht gedamaged. 

Fr-die:— Yes, Letter Books, etc., are becoming a drug on the market; 
we advise you to get out a treatise on Home Life in the Suburbs. 

Fi-KH :— No, you can claim no relationship to Mr. St-ner, for he is a direct 
descendent of Billy the Conqueror, while you are probably a descendent of 
Billy's Uncle George. 

Ba-l-rd:— Your idea of the steam engine is rather vague, the fireman 
feeds the steam to the boiler by means of a bucket, and when tired he and the 
engineer swap places. 

Va-Be-an :— Yes, Holland allows all her citizens to return once more to 
their native land, on the condition that they will remain there ever after. 

Di-bY:— Yes, the Prince of Wales is a direct descendent of the Count de 
Monte Carlo. No, Lord Dunraven did not marry an American heiress, as you 
supposed; he only took his yacht home with him. 



C69 




" Freddie " (/« lecture on freehand dratving). — '' Ruling in freehand drawing 
isn't straight work." 



Megraw, '97 :- 



Swans sing before they die ; 'twas no bad thing, 
Did certain persons die before they sing." 



Mr. Semple {in Anglo-Saxon). — " Which is the older, this verb or the causative 
derived from it ? " 



Becerra, '97, 'gS, '99 :- 



My business in this state 
Made me a looker-on." 



Ammen, 97 (to Roper ^ 'g8, after the Lafayette-Lehigh baseball gavie).—^^ What 
was the score ? " 

Roper, '98. — " Five to four, ten-inning game." 
Ammen, '97. — " Is the game over yet?" 

Morning Chapel. — " 'Mid earthly scenes forgotten or unknown." 

Dr. Shober (to U'ettlatifer, 'gS). — "Mr. Wettlaufer, discuss the preparation 
of Benzoyl Chloride." 

Wettlaufer. — "Well, sir, you take her and heat her up and," — 
Dr. Shober. — " Beg pardon, Mr. Wettlaufer, it's an it, not a female.' 

Yasharian, igoo. — "I cannot tell what the Dickens his name is." 

270 



Converse, 'gg {speaking of the Louisville Manual Training School). — " We 
built an engine and it ran without a jar." 

Bell, '97. — '' What was the efficiency?" 
Converse, 'gc,. — "About 10 horse-power." 

Holderness, '98, 'gg. — "A lion among ladies is a most dangerous thing." 

Dr. Estes {to class). — " I can't continue this lecture unless this noise stops, but 
I am not going to stop until the hour is up.' 

LUTEN, 'gg. — " O wearisome condition of humanity." 

SyMlNGTOX, 'gS {to George, 'gS). — " How did you break your lacrosse stick?" 
George. — " Some other jackass did it." 

Straub, 'gg: — 

" O thou art fairer than the evening air 
Clad in the beauty of a thousand stars." 

Business Manager. — " Mrs. Rennig, how about taking advertising space in 
The Epitome this year?" 

Mrs. Rennig. — " I have yet already advertised once in The IVhite anJ Brown." 

Ammen, '97: — 

" Thou shalt not see me blush 
Nor change countenance for this arrest." 

Brown, 'g3. — " I don't care if you fellows do gag me ; I like to see my name in 
print." 

S. B. Boarding Houses: — 

" You lie down to your shady slumber 
And wake with a bug in your ear." 

Dr. Macfarlane {during a lecture). — ■"' Mr. Yates, please close one of these 
windows over there." 

G. C. Leidy, 'gg. — " Ah, girls, look out for him, he's a smasher." 

F. B. Bell, 'g7. — {in locomotives). — " Mr. Danse, how much does a pound of 
air weigh ?" 

Mr. Danse. — ".0S07 pounds." 

Greene, igoo. — "Old gold hair, polka-dot face, and very green ways," 

271 



Mr. Emory {in Junior English Class). — " Young ladies always add postscripts 
to their letters; that is {wilh embarrassment), I have been told so." 

Kneas, 'qS. — " God made him, and therefore let him pass for man." 

Bailey, 'g8. — " Say, ' Teese,' what is a pound of steam? " 

Yates, '97. — " "Why, it's that volume of steam which weighs one pound." 

Bailey, '98. — " O ! I thought it was the steam generated by a pound of water." 

Adams, '98 : — 

" All creatures have their use (the exception proves the rule)." 

McGavock, 1900 {to Thurston, on the way from Charles').—^' Why, ' Wharty,' 
just look at that car going staggering up the street." 

Maeder, 1900 : — 

" Here's a large mouth indeed, that spits forth 
Death and mountains, rocks and seas." 

Mr. Heck {in boiler recitation). — "The steam goes out through those perfo- 
rated holes in the steam pipe." 

Barton, '97 : — 

" He was more than over his shoes in love." 

Manager {to South Bethlehem merchant). — " Is Mr. S here?" 

Merchant. — " Yes, just go once back down that stair again, and you will find 
him yet." 

Horner, '98: — 

"A great talker is a great liar." 

Pennington, '97 {to Megraw, 'gj). — " Say, Maggie, you know I don't believe I 
have grown a bit since I was a Freshman, because I have got on a shirt I have been 
wearing for the last ten years." 

" Sleepy " Sheafker, '97: — 

" Slowness personified." 

Instructor Kiefer {in Zoology Class).—" Mr. Knight, in the digestive tract of 
mammals, what organs come first into use?" 

Knight, '98. — " The mouth and the phalanx.'' 

Schwerin, 1900: — 

" Greater men than I may have lived, but I do not believe it." 

272 



ROBB, 1900 {to member of ^^ Epitome" Board). — " When I filled out my Epitome 
slip, 1 put down my name for one Epitome, and now I find I want two. Do you 
think the Board will let me buy another?" 

Levi's Sign. — " Three things a wise man will not trust." 

Prof. Harding {in Sophomore Physics). — " Are you gentlemen taking notes?'' 
Class. — "Yes, sir." 
Prof. H. — " Then do so." 

L.'^B. Deposits. — " Farewell — God knows when we shall meet again." 

Mr. Brooks {in Railroad surveying). — '' Mr. Dehm, have you the level tan- 
gent?" 

Mr. Dehm. — "Yes, sir." 

Mr. Brooks. — " What degree of curvature?" 

C1.-A.SSICALS. — "A little learning is a dangerous thing." 

Freddie {iVoz'. g, in strength of materials, pats the following on the board). — 
"Problem: i. Correct size paper. 2. Correct ink (jet black). 3. Legible. 4. E.x- 
plain fully." 

Benedict, "99: — 

" Describe him, who can ? 
An abridgment of all that was pleasant in man." 

" Baldy " Hazel. — "Say, Mr. Ferguson, I beg your pardon, but are you 
deaf? Well, I thought maybe you were, I have asked you several questions and you 
have paid no attention to them." 

LuTEX, '99. — " Wot t'ell ! " 

Megr.wv, '97. — "There's one thing about Danse that I don't like; he's too 
effeminate." 

1900. — " The strolling tribe ; a despicable race." 

KODJBANOFF, 'gS. — " Mr. Heck, what did you say was the square root of 11'- ?" 

Kneas, '9S: — 

" Of manners gentle, of affections mild, 
In wit a babe, in simplicity a child." 

Megraw, '97 {while looking at a full-length bill-poster of Margaret Fuller).— 
" Oh, dear ! I hope my eyes never look as mournful as that.'' 

273 



Degener, '99 : — 

"0, wonderful son, that can so astonish a mother." 

Adams, '97, '98. — " Nor knew, fond youth, it was himself he loved." 

Mr. Biggin. — " Mr. Canfield, what is the best material for making drawing- 
boards ? '' 

Caneield, 1900. — "Wood." 

Kennedy, '97, '98 : — 

"Awkward, embarrass'd, stiff without the skill 
Of moving gracefully, or standing still." 

Klein, '99 (/f Freshman). — "What is your name? My name is Klein, but I 
guess you have heard of me before, everybody knows ' Budge.'" 
Adams, '97, '98. — "A pretty lad, but bursting with conceit." 

KODJBANOFF, '98 (in German C/ass). — " The Kroats are Slavs." 
Fuller, '98. — "What did you say they were? Slobs?" 

CoNGDON, 1900. — " I am not in the roll of common men." 

Pettit, '99 (picking tip a magnet). — " Dr. Richards, which end of this bar- 
magnet is magnetized ?" 

Either oe the twins of '99. — " A sweet, attractive kind of grace. 

Syming'ION, '98 (/(' Mr. Biggin^ in Str. of Mat. Class)^ — "Mr. B . you 

show your ignorance before the whole class. ' 

Mr. Biggin (much embarrassed) . — " \'ou don't seem to be surprised." 

Mr. Semi'LE. — " Mr. Stockett, in ordinary conversation, which premise is 
usually omitted ? " 

Stockett, '98. — " The conclusion." 

HOiNOR Sy.stem. — "A horse! a horse! My kingdom for a horse." 

Mr. Danse (to man at the Gas Exposition in Neiv York). — " Will you explain 

to me the working of the valve of that engine ? " 

The Man. — " Why? Are you especially interested in machinery?" 

Mr. Danse. — " Yes, I am Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at 

Lehigh University." 

Flunk B.a^cks. — " We have seen better days." 

274 



Mr. Skmple {in Logic). — " Mr. , what is an illicit process of tiie major 

term ? " 

Mr. . — " I don't know." 

Mr. Semple. — " Don't know ? Then gitess." 



Edmonston, '98 : — 

" Eternal smiles his emptiness betray, 

As shallow streams run dimpling all the way." 

Dr. Chandler. — " If you have these four elements in one bottle and you put in 
(NH4)3S and don't get back a black precipitate, you will know that three of the 
elements are not present." 



Strauu, '99 :- 



" Not all the pumice of the polished town, 
Can smooth this roughness of the barnyard down." 




CHAMBEmi(< 



275 



^\p^^. 




P€UIA&L# • wnm 



ESTABLISHED 1818. 



BROOKS BROTHERS, 

Broadway, cor. 22d Street, New York City. 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

READY MADE AND MADE 
TO MEASURE. 




^X our department of clothing to order will be found a 
complete assorttiient of Scotch and English Suitings in 
"all-the-3^ear-round " seasonable and tropical weights, 
and a large variety of other goods, giving the fullest 
opportunit}^ for selection. In recognition of a general desire for 
appropriate dress for Outing purposes we have given special care 
to the selection of all articles embraced in this class. They in- 
clude Knickerbocker Suits ; Red Golfing Jackets ; Scotch hand- 
knit Stockings in suitable colors and designs ; Golfing Caps and 
Gloves; Highland Gaiters, etc., etc. 

Our Furnishing Department contains an exceptionally rich 
and handsome line, representing the best foreign makers, and 
selected in London for this season's use. 

Catalogue, samples and rules for self-measure sent on 
application. 



JEWELL BELTING CO 



TANNERS OF 



pure Oal^ Barl^ 
Japped l^eatl^er 






MANUFACTURERS OF 



SHORT LAP BELTING 



Office and Factory, 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



TA N N E R I E S-^^—r 

ROME, GA. . . 
JELLICO, TENN. 



Established 1 83 1 . 



Annual Capacity, 1 ,OO0. 



BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS, 
Single Expansion ^ Compound Locomotives 

Broad and Narrow Gauge Locomotives, Mine and 
Furnace Locomotives, Compressed Air Locomotives, 
Steam Cars and Tramway Locomotives, Planta- 
tion Locomotives, Oil-Burning Locomotives. : : 

Adapted to every variety of service, and built accurately to gauges and templates after 

standard designs or to railroad company's drawings. Like parts of 

different engines of same class perfectly interchangeable. 

ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVES AND ELECTRIC 
CAR TRUCKS WITH APPROVED MOTORS. 



Burnham, Williams & Co., 



Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



THE DEANE 

STEAM PUMP COMPANY, 



Pumping Machinery 
of every description. 



HOLYOKE, MASS. 




s> 







x.-.^.^.^-.^^ 



^f'1^^^ -X 






- r^- ..mar, ■— ';JBg" - - '-- 



DEANE DUPLEX POWER WATER WORKS PUMP. 



We two ^ ^ $ 

wish to say that we are still cater- 
ing to the Merchant Tailoring trade 
of this part of the universe. We 
care not if you be from the burning 
sands of Patagonia, or from the ice- 
bound shores of Lapland, it's all 
the same, we'll supply your wants 
when it comes to the question of 
suitable 

GARMENTS FOR MEN'S WEAR. 



SCHNELLER & SNYDER, 
TAILORS, 

No. 6 South Main St. Bethlehem, Pa, 



L. SCHUTTE & CO., 

Owners of Patents and Sole Hanufacturers, 

TWELFTH k TH031PS0N STS., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The Exhaust Steam Induction 
Condenser. 




The Universal Double Tube 
Injector. 

The Most Complete and Reliable 
Boiler Feeder Known. 







OPERATED ENTIRELY BY ONE HANDLE. 

Will lift water twenty feet. 
Will take hot water up to 150° temperature. 



Setid /or Descri/'tive Catalogiii:. 



The Exhaust Steam Induction Condenser. 

For Steam Engines, Steamboats 
and Pumps. 

Providing its own Water Supply under Suction 

or Using Pressure Water. 

The Water Check is Perfect, Automatic 

and Noiseless 



Send for Descriptive Catalogue, 

Condensers, Injectors, 

Syphon Pumps, Blowers & Ventilators, 

Noiseless Heaters 

or Caloric Transfers. 

Watson-Mueller Steam Traps, 

Extra Heavy Valves. 

Air Compressors and Exhausters 

for all Purposes, 
vi 



Established 1851. 



AMERICAN 



Incorporated 1854. 



STEAM GAUGE COMPANY. 



(()rig;inal Steam Gauge Co.) 



SOLE MANUFACTURERS OF THE 



AMERICAN THOMPSON IMPROVED INDICATOR. 

ALSO MANUFACTURERS OF 

Pop Safety and Water Relief Valves. 

Also BOURDON STEAM GAUGES with Lane's Improvement, 
Water Gauges, Gauge Cocks, Revolution Counters, etc., etc. 

NEW YORK BRANCH WESTERN BRANCH 

35 Dey St.. New York. N. Y. „^^^ ^^^,^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^ ,6 N. Canal St.. Chicago. III. 

3i, 36, 38 Chardon St., Boston, Mass. 



^M^^mm^nM^. 



^^_FOR THE '^ 






?i 



■^ 1 



^1 25£>5LRTSMAN 

I SHOT GUNS, I 
i 4?IFLES, 

'""AMMUNITJON Etc. 



FOOTBALL, 

<L BASE BALL Is 

i >AMD AI^L _* 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE 

CHARLES DAU/ GUN 

SCHOVERLING, 

DALY & GALES. 

Our line of C'.oods can be purcliased of 
Miller & Markle, 5outh Bethlehem, Pa 





The Bethlehem 
Iron Co ^ 

South Bethlehem, Pa. 

Steel Forgings^ 

HOLLOW OR SOLE). 

Steel Plates for all Purposes* 
Steel Rails, Billets, Muck Bars. 

Guns of all Calibres* 
Armor Plate* 



NEW YORK OFFICE, PHILADELPIHA OFFICE, 

100 Broadway. 421 Chestnut Street. 

CHICAGO OFFICE, 
Marquette Building. 



J. BISHOP & CO.. 

Refiners, Melters '"' '^^rr'-'^" Platinum Ware 



OK ALL KINDS. 
Crucibles, Dishes, Etc., re=niade and repaired at reasonable rates. 
Circulars and prices sent on application. 



Express Office-MALVERN, PA. 



Post Office— SUQARTOWN, PA. 




ADAMANTINE SHOES AND DIES. 

AND CHROME CAST STEEL 

Gams, Tappets, Bosses, Roll Shell and Cruslier Plates. Also Rolled 
Parts for Huntington and Other Mills. 
These castings are extensively used in all the Mining States and 
Territories of North and South America. Guaranteed to prove better 
and cheaper than any others. Orders solicited subject to above con- 
ditions. When ordering send sketch with exact dimensions. Send for 
Illustrated Circular. 
C. P. Haughian, President. CHROME STEELWORKS, 

I: J.- CA^r; Secrlf;^^;' Kent Ave., Keap and Hooper Sts„ 

J. G. DuNSCOMB, Treasurer. 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 




gV>HMA&lW*** 




CARPOLTON HOTEL, 

BALTinORE, MD. 

LEADING HOTEL OF THE CITY. 

SPECIAL RATE, $2.50 PER DAY TO ATHLETIC 

ORGANIZATIONS 

J. F». SHANNON, Nlanager 



TWO " TEN TEETH CUT AT ONCE 

% 



PRACTICALLY AND 

THEORETICALLY 

CORRECT. 




EBERHARDT'S PATENT 



TRrtDCMABK 

EBERHARDT'S PATENT 
"RADIAL DUPLEX" 



NEW TYPE GEftR CUTTER ZEE GANG CUTTERS 

THEY ARE BEING UNIVERSALLY USED BY 

U S. GOV. ARSENALS, UNIVERSITIES, TECHNICAL SCHOOLS, 
ALL FIRST CLASS ELECTRICAL AND MANUFACTURING PLANTS. 



EBERHARDT'S 
PATENT 



- STRIKE - 

MY SIfiIKE THiBF 




EXTENSION \ 

BASE 

SHARERS. 



DRILL PRESSES, 
R&GK GUTTERS, 
PRESSES; 
ALL HIGH GL&SS 
M&GHINE TOOLS. 



double: triple quick stroke 

(TRADE MAHK) 



NEWARK, N. J., U. S. A. 



HOLYOKE MACHINE COMPANY, Hoiyoke, Mass, 




^K^asasams^ 



Manufacturers of Boyden and Hercules Turbine WheeU Wood Pulp a^^^^ 
Designs, Hy^drauhc^Pu,u^P^^^^^^^^^ 



LIBRARIES 



Our topically arranged General Library 
List of the Standard and New Books of all 
Publishers revised to date has just left the 
press. It will be found of great use to 
Librarians and all others having occasion 
to select titles, and will be mailed free 
on application. Estimates on proposed 
additions to public and private libraries 
promptly furnished by 

THE BAKER & TAYLOR CO., 

AVHOLESALE BOOKS, 

5 and 7 Bast Sixteenth St. New York. 




Gaps and Gowns 

Our manufacturing 
facilities are unsur- 
passed ; we buy ma- 
terials at minimum 
prices ; we sew every 
garment with silk, 
which means strength 
and neatness. These 
are the reasons we so 
confidently guarantee 
the fit and quality of 
ihe Caps and Gowns 
we sell. 

An illustrated Cata- 
logue, self - measure- 
ment blanks and sam- 
ples of materials sent to any address upon request 
Correspondence on the subject of the sale or 
rental of Caps and Gowns is earnestly solicited. 
We w.'nt to estimate on your order. 

5TRAWBRIDQE& CLOTHIER, 

PHILADELPHIA. 



FR0NT2'2 


BACK |34 




\ 


1} 


(M' 


^"^ADE MARK 

VIenlo 

LINEN 



ABOVE BUTTON HOLE 




e. KEL-LER 5^ SON, 
JEWELERS, SILVERSniTHS, OPTICIANS. 

Fraternity and QIass Work a Specialty. 

711 HANIILXON SXREKT, 

ALLENTOWN, PA. 



Foreign and Domestic Watches. 
Card and Invitation Engraving. 



Cut Glass and Fine China. 
Lense Grinding. 



Jt- J. J- CLOTHIERS. J^ J^ J- 

Many are the needs that confront you for this season. We wish to make our- 
selves known to you as Caterers of High Art Clothing, and dealers in Men's 
Haberdashery. We anticipated j'our wants and wishes, and for this season laid 
in a line of Piece Goods to select from for Made to Order Suits, that are unsur- 
passed. In our Custom Department we have four of the Leading Cutters in the 
Lehigh Valley, and we are right behind every transaction we make ; in other words 
your responsibility ends, and ours begins, when you deal with us. If you want to 
be treated right, buy right, and save money, make our store your trading home. 



BREINIQ & BACHMAN, 



SIXTH AND HAMILTON 
ALLENTOWN, PA. 



STS. 



VAN HORN & SON, 

121 NORTH NINTH ST., PHILA. 

Theatrical and Historical Costumes, 

ALSO A FULL LINE OF DRESS SUITS AND STUDENT 
GOWNS TO HIRE AND HADE TO ORDER. 

Official Costumers to Girard Ave. Theatre, Mask and Wig Club of U. 
of P., Paint and Powder Club, of Baltimore, IVId., Polytechnic School, 
Brooklyn, Brown University, Providence, R. I. 

SOUTH BETHLEHEM STAR. 

(Daily, Except Sunday.) 

Delivered by Carriers, 8 Cents a Week ; By Mail, $4. a Year. 
First=Class Job Printing Department. 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS AND COLLEGE SOCIETY PRINTING 
RECEIVE CAREFUL ATTENTION. 

8 EAST THIRD STREET, = = SOUTH BETHLEHEH, PA. 

A. QRADWOHL, 

DEALER IN 

Dry Goods Jdttcv Goods and notions, 

Choice Groceries and P^^ovisions. 
Cor. Fourth and ¥ew Sts., kSoutli Bctlileliem, Pa. 



How easy you can reach the Larg'est 
and Best Stocked Drug Store ^ ^ 



TELEPHONE, 



JACOBY 



Cor. 4th and New Sts., South Bethlehem^ Pa. 

GEO. W. ROWLAND, 

Druggist and Pharmaceutist, 

423 Wyandotte Street, Below Fourth, 

TELEPHONE. SOUTH BETHLEHEM, PA. 

Dr. Wm. H. Dressor, SURGEON 

Graduate of Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery. I J t^ I Ni X J.O A ♦ 

MAYORS VAPOR for Extracting Teeth Without Pain. 

OFFICE AND RESIDENCE, 

No. 105 West Fourth Street, SOUTH BETHLEHEM, PA. 

Office Hours, 8 to 12 A.M.. 1 to .s P.M. 

Novelty Electric Company 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 

ELECTRICAL MATERIAL . INDUCTION COILS FOR 

OF EVERY KIND "^ ROENTGEN X RAYS 

HIGH GRADE INSTRUMENTS AT LOWEST PRICES 

NOVELTY ELECTRIC COMPANY, 

50, 52, 54 N. Fourth St., PHILADELPHIA. 

Write for Prices Mentioning Articles Wanted. 



DREKA 



Fine Stationery and Engraving House, 

1121 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 



COLLEGE INVITATIONS 
STATIONERY 
PROGRAMMES 
BANQUET MENUS 
FRATERNITY ENGRAVING 
VISITING CARDS 



WEDDING INVITATIONS 
RECEPTION CARDS 
MONOGRAMS 
COATS OF ARMS 
ADDRESS DIES 
HERALDRY 



COATS OF ARMS PAINTED FOR FRAMING. 



Ci 




TME. 


■ ►^A'^E. 


K)A.i-L 


c-rcM.f:'!; 


. fe-r ^ CT i_-T - 


c 


o to 



A. C. .BORHEK. 



L. A. MIKSCH. 



BORHEK & MIKSCH, 

DEALERS IN 

Lumber, Coal and Wood^ 



YARD: MAIN STREET, 
UPPER LEHIGH COAL. WEST BETHLEHEM- 



WINDSOR HOTEL, 



FRANK F. HITCHCOCK, Manager. 



PHILADELPHIA. 



FILBERT ST., BETWEEN 12th & 13th. 

The largest $2.00 per day Hotel in America, f^f* One-Half Block from 



Electricity, Elevator, Steam Heat. 



Reading Terminal. 



\X/ Al S. MITMAH 

2 4TH AMD NEW STREETS, 

^ SOUTH BETHLEHE/W, PA. 

f ailor i f|^en^ f urnisbeL 

Our Garments have a taking style which recommends 
itself to the well-dressed man. 

Our New Department, Men's Furnishings, is well 
stocked with the finest importations and American pro- 
ductions. 

You will find our establishment Au Fait. 



uad Camera, t '^ ' '^ "'™''' 




Price, $5. 



ime and Instantaneous 
^— ^^^ Shutter. Leather Covered. 

Send two-cent stamp for Sample Photograph and 
Illustrated Booklet. 



Rtl^lC(MJ(^ 12 Pictures without reloading. Loaded in 
IJIIvllvyV» daylight. All improvements. PflCC, $$. 

Send for free Booklet. 

E. &. H. T. ANTHONY & CO., 

591 Broadway, NEW YORK. 



Boohs iSt Stationery^ ^^ 

fountain pcns^ ^ 

Souvenirs of Bethlehem^ 
Souvenirs of Lehigh University^ 
f)istory of Lehigh dniversity^ 

an Illustrated 4to. 

Leading periodicals and jVIagazines. 



»sf» •!• ^f• (^ *f/» 



AUG. H. LEIBERT, 

^.^^.^BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER. 

W. M. FLECKENGER, 

PORTRAITS- . 

f" ffc il t "^- "^ 'f- 1 1 :''- .i" iC' .f :^' i''^ 1 1 1^' 

PLATINOTYPES ARE THE LATEST IN 
PORTRAITURE. . . . 
GROUND FLOOR STUDIO. . . . 
NO STAIRS TO CLIHB. . . . 

NO. 17 BPOAD STPEET, BETHLEHEM, PA. 



THE BEST FOR TOOLS, DRILLS, DIES, &C. 



JESSOP'S 5TEEL 



1793 1897. Established over a Century Ago. 

GOLD HEDAL, PARIS I889. 
HEDAL, WORLD'S COLUHBIAN EXPOSITION, 1893. 

WM. JESSOP & SONS, Limited. 

Manufactory: SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. Chief American Office: 91 JOHN ST., NEW YORK. 

The ^^ROOT'' Improved Water-Tube Boiler. 

07 - .^^^ A Safe and Economical 

Steam Generator. 

J- 
FURNISHES DRY STEAH. 

J' 

Abend roth & Root 
Mfg. Co., 

28 CLIFF STREET, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

^i^ Weston Laboratory Standard 

VOLTMETERS—^ 

^^^ AMMETERS. 

Accurate, Reliable, Sensitive. 

Send for Catalogif. 

(^lestoii g kctrical jnsmmiem go^ 

114 = 120 William St., Newark, N. J. 






LABOR SAVING 
MACHINES 

OF THE 

Heaviest 
Types 

OUR SPECIALTY. 

Our Tools are Designed 
and Built with an eye to 
the Saving of Labor. 

More — they attain this 
end. 

CORRCSPOMDCNCC 
SOLICITED... 

WRITE FOR CATALOG. 



Horizontal Boring, Drilling and Milling Machine. 

THE NILES TOOL WORKS CO., ^"^^11% 

HAIVIILXON, OHIO. 

BRANCHES— New York, Chicago, Boston, Phaadelpfaia, Pittsburg. 



lundell 



FAN and 
POWER 



^ 



Motors 



Thousands in Use 





Iron and Brass Armored 
Insulating Conduit ^ 



INTERIOR 
CONDUIT & 
INSULATION 
COMPANY 

GENERAL OFFICES 
AND WORKS: 

527 West 34th Street 
NEW YORK 




Theo. Alteneder & Sons, 

945 Ridge Ave., PHILADELPHIA 




ATHLETICS, 
CYCLING, 

LAWN AND 

FIELD GAMES, 

HUNTING, 

YACHTING, 

FISHING, 

ADVENTURE, and 

AMATEUR 

PHOTOGRAPHY. 



ARE THE FEATURES WHICH MAKE 

OUTING 

An ideal Magazine for College Men and 
Students in Preparatory Schools. If you 
have not seen a copy lately, send a 2-cent 
stamp for specimen. 

The Outing Publishing Co., 

239 Fifth Avenue, New York. 




Electric Laundry Co. 

Only Laundry using filtered water. Everything 
first class. Mending free. Worn out neck bands 
replaced and no extra charge. High gloss, 
medium and domestic finish. Drop a postal. 
Special rates for Students. .. 

KISTLER & HOLLENBACH, Prop^s. 

223 BROADWAY, 

SO. BETHLEHEM, PA. 



Telephone Connections. 



xxi 



FINE FURNITURE and CARPETS. 



When too much study is "weariness to the flesh," you will 
please bear in mind that there is rest to be found for the weary in 
one of our large 

turkisb, morris or Keclining €,U\n. 

And if you are " in it," you will readily admit that we are right, and 
we simply add that the prices are low. 






,"£<*:■ 




#> 



Add to the above a comfortable Couch, the soft side ' ' up " made 
"with care " and " up to date " in every respect, and you will have 
no need of seeking for a better resting place elsewhere. And if you 
are " on to it," you will surely find the much-needed rest after vic- 
torious games of battles have been fought on the Campus, or diligent 
and successful work done in your study. 

Great revolution in prices on . . . 

Writing Desks^ Book Cases^ — _ 

_ Rnrlrmg^ and Revolving Chairs 

has taken place, and there is every chance to make your Study at- 
tractive in appearance, comfortable and home-like to yourself. 
A full selection of . . 



Carpets, Mattings and Rugs 



to select from. Picture Framing and Renting of Chairs a specialty. 

WORSLEY BROS., 

South Bethlehem, Pa. 



...GENT'S UP=TO=DATE SHOES... 

Special Agents for 

HANAN & SON'S SHOES 
and 
JAMES A. BANISTER & CO. 

Patent Leathers and Russia Calf 
Shoes in all the Up=to=Date Styles. 

Repairing Promptly 
and Neatly Done... 

J. 7VY. SCHNKBEL- St BRO., 

flyers Building, = 53 So. Main St., = BETHLEHEM, PA. 




» THE 



Keeiey Curej 



I Alcohol, 

I Opium, 

I Tobacco 



Produce each a disease having a 
definite pathology. The 
yields easily to the Double Chloride * 
of Gold Treatment as administered ¥ 



¥ 
¥ 

disease ^ 



at the Keeiey 
burg, Pa. 



Institute, Harris- 







THE ST. DENIS, 

Broadway and nth St , New York. 
Opposite Grace Church. European Plan. 

The popular reputation the St. Denis has acquired can be readily traced to its 

Unique Location, Home-like Atmosphere, Excellent Cuisine, 
Courteous Service and Moderate Prices. 



Wn. TAYLOR & SON, Props. 



f^%^^/%,^ 



Cbc €ba$. B, eiliott €o,, 

ART PUBLISHERS AND MAKERS OF 



STEEL-PLATE COLLEGE INVITATIONS, 
PROGRAMMES, DIPLOMAS, 
CLASS STATIONERY, 
VISITING CARDS, 



FRATERNITY STATIONERY, 
WEDDING INVITATIONS, 

CLASS ANNUALS, CATALOGUES, 
Write for Samples and Prices. 



OFFrCES AND FACTORY, 



9 JO and 9 J2 Filbert Street, 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



S. W. Cor. Broad and Race Streets. 




THE NEW ROCHESTER LAMP 

THE STANDARD OF THE WORLD 

Other lamps may be " like " or '• as good " asTHE ROCHESTER 
in appearance, but like all imitations, lack the peculiar 
merit of the genuine. Look for the NEW ROCHESTER stamp. 

No Smoke, No Smell, No Broken Chimneys. 

Made in everv conceivable design and finish, for all lighting 
or heating purposes, and at prices to compete with any. 

WHY BE CONTENT WITH ANY BIT THE BEST? 




This No. 876/675 n.\NQrf:T 



ThisNo 310IT, HKATKI}. 



L.AMP, heightai) inches, cora- t heitrlit 224 inches, will heat 
plete with Silk Shade of any ♦ room 10x12. Nee 



color (k-sircd . base and head 
(oil well and holder) finished in 
Bright Gold, fiprure in Bronze, 
SilverorOilt. sent anywhere on 
receipt of price, $4.50. 



eat and attrart- 
n appearance. Well made 
Combustion perfect. Sent any- 
where on receipt of price. 



^4,00. 



96.Pae:e Art Oatalo^nie Free. 



\ The Rochester Lamp CoJ?^^S.^;^%%t New York 




THE YOUNG MAN 



just starting out in life needs backing. 
Competition for places in good business 
houses is keen. Boys are always anxious to "Go to Work.'' The difficulty is in 
finding a situation. SALARIED POSITIONS are secured to competent pupils at 
Eastman Business College. Stenography, Bookkeeping, etc., thoroughly taught, 
by mail or personally. We train for practical work, and every year place hundreds in money- 
making positions. The young people who place themselves under our instruction leain 
how to put their shoulders to the wheel, get a bread and butter education. A diploma of 

is a certificate of ability, is recognized as 
such by merchants, manufacturers and 
business men everywhere. They are glad 
to employ an Eastman graduate. No 
other backing is needed except gradua- 
tion from their business and shorthand 
courses. 

The school is a veritable Business Cen- 
tre and is famous for its practical method 
of teaching the young of either sex. 
The headwork of business is actually car- 
ried on there — every phase of it. Thus 
the boy must get the making of a good 
business man — he can't help it. The 
College Journal and other literature make 
excellent reading. Write for the Catalogue — a beautiful and interesting book sent free 
to any one. Address 

CLEMENT C. GAINES, Prest., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 




HAND OR POWER PLANER. 



A COiVlPLETE ASSORTMENT 




OF 



AN EXCELLENT MACHINE. 



Machinery, Tools, 
Benches k Supplies, 

FOR 

Manual Training Schools, 

J- 

FOR SALE BY 

A. J. WILKINSON & CO., 

184 to 188 Washington St., 
BOSTON, MASS. 




ELEVATING 
CONVEYING 



AND 



MACHINERY 

FOR DANDLING MATERIAL OF ALL KLNDS, 



POWER TRANSMISSION 
MACHINERY. 

COALMIN'NG MACHINERY. 



THE JEFFREY MFG. CO. 
Columbus, Ohio. 



163 Washington St. 
NEW YORK. 

Send for Catalogue. 



Richard B. Lockwood, 

COLLEGE, 
FRATERNITY and 
CLASS ENGRAVER, 

203 Broadway, 

NEW YORK. 

Fraternity and Class Engraving. 
Pictorial and Heraldic Steel Plates. 
Illustrations for College Annuals. 
Diplomas, Certificates of Membership. 
Class and Fraternity Crests. 
Coats-of-Arms, Monograms. 
Address and Lodge Headings. 
Book Plates, Seals, Devices. 
Fine Writing Papers, Calling Cards. 
Stamping, Embossing, Hluminating. 

Art Engraving in Bank Note 
style. Moderate Prices. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE. 




TRADE MARKSf 
DESIGNS, 
COPYRIGHTS &c. 

Anyone sondins a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain, free, wliether an invention ig 
probably iHitentable. runiinunication.s strictly 
confidential. Oldest apeucy fdrsecuriiit; patents 
in America. We have a Washington office. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the 

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, 

beautifully illustrated, largest circul.inon of 
anv scientitlc Journal, weekly, terms ?i3.llil a year; 
$1.50 six months. Specimen copies and RAND 
Book on Patents sent free. Address 

MUNN & CO , 
361 Broadway, New York. 



B. F. STURTEVANT CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

THE STURTEVANT 

Steel Pressure Blowers, Portable Forges, Countershafts, Pulleys. 

Hangers, Blast Gates, Monogram Blowers and Exhausters, 

Steel Plate Exhausting Fans, Planing Mill Exhausters, 

Ventilating Fans, Cotton Elevators, Steam Fans, Steam Traps^ 

Steam Hot Blast Apparatus, Sectional Base Heaters, Dry Kiln 

Appurtenances, Rails, Lumber Trucks, Steam Engines 

(Horizontal and Upright, Automatic and Throttling, Single and 

Double), Anemometers, Pressure Gauges, etc., etc. 

B. F. STURTEVIHT GOMPINY, Works: BOSTON, MISS. 

34 Oliver Street, Boston, Mass. 75 Queen Victoria Street, London, E. C, England. 

131 Liberty Street, New York, N. Y. 2t VVest Nile Street, Glasgow, Scotland. 

135 North Third Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 87 Ziramerstrasse, Bslin, Germany. 

16 South Canal Street, Chicago, 111. 3 Kungsholmstorg, Stockholm, Sweden. 



MclNTOSH, Seymore & Co., 

AUBURN, N, Y. 

^ Manufacturers t^ 
^ of all kinds of ^ 



STATIONARY 

STEAM ENGINES. 



Cr ^ LU ^ "^ 




o 



>'^r#i^fer»)'«^'yr»>^yrri-^r»>^Wr»>'fe*)->yc»i-yr»i-^r»5"fer»s3>' 



HARRISBURGS WORKS 

General Office and Works: HARRISBURG, PA., U. S. A. 




THE HARRISBURG IDEAL TANDEM COMPOUND ENGINE. 

Automatic Labticatlon. Superior Regulation. Perfect Equilibrium in Action. Highest Econoiay' 




^ameron C team p ump. 

SIMPLE. 

COMPACT, 

DURABLE, 

EFFICIENT. 




Plunger SinkI ng 
Pump. 




REGULAR PATTERN. 



.. No Outside Valve Qear .. 

FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE ADDRESS 

The A. S. Cameron Steam Pump Works, 

FOOT EAST 23rd STREET, 
NEW YORK. 




Piston Sinking 
Pump. 



ROBERT POOLE & SON COMPANY 













Engineers, Pounders and Machinists, Baltimore, Md. 

RITER <Sc COTTLEY, 

Iron and Steel Construction 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Steel Frames, Roofs and Buildings, Columns and Girders, 

Oil Tanks and Refineries, Blast Furnaces, Steel 

Works, Boilers (all kinds,) Stand Pipes, Gas Holders, 

Large Draught Stacks, Hydraulic Flanging (special shapes.) 



RITER & CONLEY, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

New York Office : (Taylor Building,) 39 «& 41 Cortlandt Street. 




Cost Reducing: flachines 

for Rapid Lathe Work. 



Broad 
Range and 
Quick 
Change. 



^. Saves its 




2 X 24 Flat Turret Lathe. 



Jones & Lamson Machine Co., 

SPRINGFIELD, VERHONT, U. S. A. 



gi 0onbrock ^ tcaiti poller go^ 

. . . BROOKLYN, N. Y. . . 

rianufacturers of the 

/T^orrir} '*Qimax" ai}d ^'Qo/ripou^d" Safety U/ater 

... TUBE BOILERS ... 

BUILT IN UNITS OF 50 TO 1,000 H. P. 

CAUTION. — Beware of infringers, they will be rigidly prosecuted. 

ALSO BUILDERS OF 

Smoke Stacks, Tanks, Etc., and all Classes of Iron Work. 

Specifications, Drawings and Prices furnished on application. Send for Catalogue of 
Climax and Compound Boilers. 



Renry nmm $ S«n$, Titc, 

Hcysionc Saw, Cool, 
Steel a"" Tile (Uork$. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



66 



CAHALL" BOILERS. 



If 



The following manufacturers all use, like, and repeat their orders for the " Cahall " 
boiler, why isn't it good policy for YOU to at least find out something about It? 
We will be glad to send you free our illustrated catalogue on application. 

THE BEST TESTinONIAL IS A REPEATED ORDER. 



Mahoning Val. Iron Co., 

Youngstown, O., 

3 Orders, 1895. 1300 H. P. 

Republic Iron Works, 

Pittsburgh, Pa., 

4 Orders, J8g2 to 1896. 

825 H.P. 

Union Rolling Mill Co., 

Cleveland, O., 

3 Orders, 1895. 700 H. P. 

Granite City Steel Co., 

Granite City, 111.. 

2 Orders, 1894 to 1895. 

700 H. P. 

Dihvorth Paper Co., 

New Castle, Pa., 

2 Orders, 1894 to 1895. 

600 H. P. 

Cornwall Iron Co., 

Cornwall, Pa., 

2 Orders, 1895. 600 H. P. 

Douglas Furnaces, 

Sharpsville, Pa., 

2 Orders, 1895. 500 H. P. 

Zug & Comoany, 

Pittsburgh, Pa., 

2 Orders, 1894 to 1895. 

450 H. P. 

Inland Steel Co., 

Chicago, 111., 

2 Orders. 1894 to 1895. 

400 H. P. 

Brown. Bonnell Iron Co., 

Youngstown O., 
2 Orders, 1895. 324 H. P 




Sharon Iron Co., Sharon, Pa., 2 Orders, 1894 to i 
Brown K Co., Inc., Pittsburgh, Pa., 3 Orders, 18^ 
Philadelphia i Reading Coal & Iron Co., Pottsville, Pa., 2 Orders, 1895 to i 
F. C. Hood, Watertown, Mass., 2 Orders, 400 H. P 



Aetna Standard Iron Co., 

Wheeling, West Va.. 

2 Orders, 1893 to 1895. 

200 H. P. 

National Tube Works Co., 
McKeesport, Pa., 

2 Orders, 1895 to 1896. 
600 H. P. 

Apollo Iron & Steel Co., 

Apollo, Pa., 

3 Orders, 1895. 

10,250 H. P. 

Carnegie Steel Co., 

Pittsburgh, Pa., 

3 Orders, 1894 to 1897. 
7 650 H. P. 

Michigan Alkali Co., 

Wyandotte, Mich., 

5 Orders, 1894 to 1897. 

3,800 H. P. 
Shoenberger Steel Co., 

Pittsburgh, Pa., 
8 Orders, 1892 to 1897. 

2,775 H. P. 
Philadelphia Gas Co., 

Pittsburgh, Pa., 

3 Orders, 1894 to 1895. 

2,000 H. P. 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., 

Pittsburgh, Pa., 

2 Orders, 1896 1,500 H. P. 

Salem Iron Co., 

Leetonia, O., 

3 Orders, 1894 to 1895. 

1,000 H.P. 

900 H. P. 
600 H.P. 

750 H. P. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE. 

Thayer & Co.. Inc., Cahall Sales Oepartment, 



Tremont Building, Boston, Mass. 
Taylor Building, New York City. 
Drexel Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Bank of Commerce Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

"The Rookery," Chicago. Ml. 

71 Perin Building. Cincinnati, O. 

826 Cayahoga Building, Cleveland, O. 

10 Peninsular Bank Building, Detroit, Hich. 

712 Union Street, New Orleans, La. 



CHAS. W. WELSH, The Wyandotte Tonsorial Artist, 

Physiognomical Hair Dresser, Facial Operator, 
Cranium Manipulator and Capillary Abridg-er. 

Hair Cutting and Shaving with Ambidextrous Facility. 

N. B. — Massage Treatment given, and Treatment for 
Baldness and all Scalp Disorders. 



407 Wyandotte Street, 



SOUTH BETHLEHEM, PA. 




Yoo\ MfcbiTATiori'=> • 



Kte. t>0 . l-r. CA-Mt A»o^ 



LINDENMUTH, OUTING:: 



The 
Fotografer, 



24 N. Sixth Street, 

ALLENTOWN, PA. 

Medals Awarded : 

New York, St. Louis. 



An afternoon or evening's 
run to Allentown, your 
neighboring City to the 
West, including a visit to 

Peters & Jacoby^s 
Gem Dining and 
Ice Cream Parlors 

For Refreshments, will be very 

helpful to your studies. 

We sell Huyler's, Lowney's and 

Maillard's Fine Chocolates and 

Bon-Bons in sealed packages. 

PETERS & JACOBY, 

627 Hamilton St., ALLENTOWN, PA. 




RICHHOND STRAIGHT CUT NO. i CIGARETTES. 

Cigarette Smokers, who are willing to pay a little 
more than the price charged for the ordinary trade 
Cigarettes, will find THIS BRAND superior to 
all others. These Cigarettes are made from the 
brightest, most delicately flavored and highest 
cost Gold Leaf grown in Virginia. This is the 
Old and Original Brand of Straight Cut Ciga- 
rettes, and was brought out by us in the year 1S75. 
Beware of Imitations, and observe that the 
firm name as below is on every package. 

KL-LEN 5^ GINTER, 
Zbc Hmerican ITobacco Company, 

SUCCESSOR, .MANUFACTURER, 

RICHXIOND. VIRGINIA. 

Have you seen our beautiful assortment of the following named Instruments, for 
which we are the Sole Agents : 

Steinway & Sons Pianos. 

Mason & Hamlin Organs. 
The Wilcox & White Self Playing Pianos and Organs. 
The Washburn & C. F. Martin, Guitars and Mandolins. 

Stewart & Dolesin Banjos. 
Regnia Music Boxes, Graphophones and Phonographs. 

A Complete Assortment of Musical Merchandise. . 



.Pianos For Rent. 



G. C. ASCABACK, 



S30 HAMILTON STREET, 
ALLENTOWN, PA. 




-uto, oy ,\. rooT-.^,s«nur. c<.-.-.4er«.- 



iri^ourpriflethcit" 
we eiuil)le ciiv/bocjv ciiv/ 
'where to Ixiv or .sell or 
exclAciage new or secoiAcJhaiAd 

schoolbooks 
of all the publishers 

proniptlv ciivl at" New \'ork price^s. 

AlplAcibetiCcil CcUciloyue free to 

GiY/oiAe wl\o iiAeatioivs rhi.sdd 

Hinds & Noble 

4 Cooper Institute, N. Y 




The Nation^s Favorite Musical Instrument* 

We illustrate here our style 23-4 
Autoharp. This instrument has 23 
strings, and 5 bars producing 5 
chords. The whole is nicely finished. 
Sent by express paid to any express 
office in the United States upon re- 
ceipt of $5.00. Send for our hand- 
somely illustrated story, " How the 
Autoharp Captured the Family," 
which describes our various styles. 

Autoharps range in price from 
$1.50 to $150.00. For sale by all 
Music Dealers. 

Alfred Dolge «& Son., """newVor'k*'""' 




BOOK EXCHANGE, 

Lehigh^s Headquarters for College Text Books, 
either new or second-hand, 

Mathematical Instruments, 

Drawing Materials, 

Fountain Pens and Fine Stationery, 

AT THE LOWEST CASH PRICES. 

PETER O. KOCH, Proprietor, 

7 East Fourth Street, - - South Bethlehem, Pa. 

QIc possess uncqualcd facilities for the 
production of special designs of badges 
and prize work 

me arc thoroughly equipped in all other 
departments to fill your commands. . . 

SIMONS BRO. & CO., 
fraternity JcxQcUrQ^ jVIanufacturers, 

CClatchcs, ... ,.c ^, 

■r^. g 6 16-6 Jo Chestnut Mreet, 

Oiamonds, 

jewelry, 6n-6J3 Sansom Street, 

Silverware, 

Optical Goods. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



YOUNG'S, 
fine iJats anb HDen's dFurnisbinos, 

MAIN STREET, BETHLEHEH, PA. 




notcl HUcn.. 



J. H. HARRIS, Proprietor. 

New Building, Passenger Elevator, and all First=CIass Facilities. 
Rates, $2.50 and $3.00 per Day. 

,^p^^ Class ♦ Suppers ♦ Furnished* ^-««^ 

Xanie Sample IRooms... ...Street Gars pass tbe Boor. 

ALLENTOWN, PA. 




LEWIS HARCUS, 



DEALER IN SECOND-HAND GOO DS, 
MISFITS .. AND .. UNREDEE MED 
PLEDGES LOANS NEGOTIATED. 

«s7/* fsf* «sf* 

^ w ^ 

Corner of Fourth 
^=i Wyandotte Streets. 

xl 




KOCH BROS., 

" Cbe Big Store." 

Finest Tailors, Clothiers i Furnishers 

IN THIS SECTION OF THE STATE. 

Hotel Allen Building, Centre Square, 
ALLENTOWN, PA. 

A handsome line of Students' Bicycle and Golf Suits, 
Chock full of dash. 

Formerly KOCH & SHANKWEILER. 







ANTON HESSE, 
Practical Bookbinder, 

144 South Main Street, 
Moravian Publication Building. 

xli 



Our Specialty The $55 



FULL DRESS SUIT 



MADE OF WEST OF ENGLAND BROAD- 
CLOTH OR FULL DRESS WORSTED ; 
COAT SILK LINED, TROUSERS AND 
WAISTCOAT BRAIDED. 

Dittrich, Gleason & Co., 

inPORTING TAILORS, 
1415 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, 

ABOVE BROAD STREET. 




Samples sent upon application. Correspondence solicited. 

Measures taken anywhere in the United States. 



A COMPLETE LINE OF SPRING AND SUMMER GOODS READY 
FOR YOUR INSPECTION. 

xlii 



HARRY J. BEIDLEMAN, 



Merchant Tailor and 
Men^s Furnisher 



Broad and Wyandotte Sts., SOUTH BETHLEHEM, PA. 



LOUIS UEiZI. 



DEALER IN 



Pawnbrokers' Unredeemed Pledges, 

MERCHANT TAILOR W'SFITS, 

NEW AND SECOND-HAND CLOTHING, 

GUNS, PISTOLS, MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 

Highest Cash Price Paid for Qents' ^p-j r-^^TX i— j Ci^T 

Cast-off Clothing. ]=i b-< <^ /-V J^ ^ 1 . 




Something New in Photography. 

25 CENTS Pl^^OZm. 

e J \r 13:^4... *.« ^„J r"/,f 19 ^Cabinet Pictures can be sent by mail, and 

Send Your riCtUre and Liet ^^«^ inclose twenty-five cents in Silver or 
Postal Note and two cent stamp for return mailing, and we guarantee to return to you 
one dozen Miniature photos and the picture you send, in one week from date of receiving, 
that will give perfect satisfaction in every respect. 

F. J. WALSH, 353 Perry St., Trenton, N. J. 
xliii 



Chi$ book m% made 
by the Republic Press 
* 14 Lafayette Place* 
n. V.« * m Printers 



xliv 



LEHIGH UXWERSITY SUPPLY 

BUREAU. 



rianaged by the Students, and for the benefit of the Students. 



ALL TEXT BOOKS, AND MATERIALS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 
USED AT THE UNIVERSITY, FOR SALE. 



THE BROWN AND WHITE. 

The College Newspaper. 

PUBLISHED MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS. 



Subscription, $2.00 per year. 



Editor in-Chief: Business Manager: 

Geo. D. Heisey. H. M. Daggett, Jr. 



THE LEHIGH BURR. 

A Literary Periodical. 

PUBLISHED FORTNIGHTLY DURING THE COLLEGE YEAR. 

Subscription, $2.25 per year. If paid before February ist, Si.TS- 



Eaitor-in-Chief : Business Manager : 

Harry L. Bell, '97. Charles S. Bowers, '97 

xlv 



preparatory^ School 

FOR 

LEHIGH UNIVEPSHT. 



IRcterences : 

T. M. Drown, LL.D., President of Lehigh University, and the 
Professors comprising the Faculty of Lehigh University. 



O 



VER six hundred of our scholars have been admitted 
to the University since 1880. 



Attention is given exclusively to the requirements for 
admission to Lehigh University. 

The Physics is in charge of S. S. Clark, B.S., senior 
Instructor in Physics in Lehigh University. 

The other branches are taught by graduates of the 
University. 

Our work is our reference. This work alone has se- 
cured the unanimous endorsement of the University Faculty. 

For catalogues and particulars apply to 

WM. ULRICH, Principal, 

26 New Street, Bethlehem, Pa. 



Lehigh Qnmrsity, 

South Bctblcbem, pa. 
Chomas jMessinger Drown, LL.D., - president. 

\. Courses in 6cner<il Eiterature. 

1. The Classical Course. 

2. The Latin-Scientific Course. 

3. The Course in Science and Letters. 

TT. Courses in Cecbnology. 

1. The Course in Civil Engineering;. 

2. The Course in Mechanical Engineering;. 

3. 4. The Courses in Mining Engineering and 
Metallurgy. 

5. The Course in Electrical Engineering. 

6. The Course in Analytical Chemistry. 

7. The Course in Architecture. 

ITT. Combined Courses, covering five or six years 
and leading to a technical degree in addition to 
bachelor of arts. 

^•^^ 

For further information, for Registers and for descriptive Circulars of the 
different Courses, address 

€be Secretary of Lehigh dtiiversity, 

South Bctblcbcm, pa. 

xlvii 



The Moravian Parochial School^ 



BETHLEHEM, PA. 

Established 1742. 



"0rcparator)> T^epartment 



FOR 

T H 



LEHIGH UNIVERSn^^. 



This Department covers all the requirements for admission to the University, 



IReterences : 

THOMAS M. DROWN, LL.D., President, and the 
Members of the Faculty, of the Lehigh University. 



'TPHE Text-Books and the Methods employed are those recom- 
mended by the Faculty, and the instructors in charge of the 
classes are graduates of the University. 

For terms and catalogue, address 

ALBERT G. RAU, B.S., Superintendent. 

xlviii 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume 



COTRELL& LEONAPD, 

472 to 478 Broadway, 
ALBANY, N. Y,, 

Makers of Caps, Gowns and Hoods to Harvard 
Yale, Princeton, Columbia, Williams, Cornell, 
University of Michigan, University of Chicago 
Johns Hopkins, Lafayette, Dickinson, Alle- 
gheny, University of Pennsylvania, Bryn 
Mawr, Wellesley and scores of others. 

Illustrated Monograph, Samples, etc., 
upon Application. 



CLASS CONTRACTS A SPECL^LTY, 





^^^.^^f^ 




PORTRAITS 



^STUDIO.. .. 
MYERS BUILDING, 



^^[^ETHLEHIlAV PA. 



xlix 




Brown and White Headquarters* 

W. E. ZEARFAUS, 

Cailor, Importer and men's Turnisber. 

ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW. 

Fourth Street and Broadhead Avenue, 

P.O.Buading, SOUTH BETHLEHEM, PA. 



1 



JACOB REED^S SONS, 

CHESTNUT STREET, H\2 AND HH, 

PHILADELPHIA. 



3^ 



Che eboiccst tbitids 

In Cdiloring ana Outfitting 



Especial success in providing: for Young Men's dress 

needs. Our removal to the beautiful new store at the 
above address is a fresh departure in enterprise and orig- 
inality. Clothing, Furnishing, Hats, Shoes, Outing 
Wear, Athletic Specialties of the Best at Just Prices. 



CROSBY 



STEAM GAGE 

and Valve Co. 



SOLE PROPRIETORS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Crosby Pop Safety Valves and Water Relief 
Valves. Crosby Improved Steam Gages, 
Single Bell Chime Whistles, Patent Gage 
Testers, Pressure Recording Gages. Revo- 
lution Counters, Spring-Seat Valves, and 
many other Specialties. 

The Crosby Steam Engine Indicator, when required, 
is furnished with Sargent's Electrical Attachment, by 
which any number of diagrams can be taken simultane- 
ously. 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Pressure and Vacuum 
Gages, Water Gages, Gage Cocks, Radiator Cocks, and 
other Engine and Boiler Fittings and Supplies. 



Boston, New York, Chicago and London. 

MAIN OFFICE AND WORKS AT 

BOSTON, = IVIASS. 




THE CROSBY 
INDICATOR 
IS CONSIDERED 
TO BE THE BEST. 



PIONEER ELECTRICAL JOURNAL OF AMERICA. 




MOST POPULAR OF TECHNICAL PERIODICALS 

THE ELECTRICAL WORLD is the Lakgest, most Handsomely Illustrated and most Widely 
CiRCrTLATED journal of its kind in the world, and is read by Students, Teachers, Electrical 
Engineers, Professional Men, General Readers, in short, all who desire to keep informed in 
this ever-advancing branch of Applied Science. It is the best supplement to a course of study in Electri- 
cal Engineering tliat a student can have, for it places him in actual touch with the profession he intends 
to follow. 

If you are not ali-eady a subscriber direct, through one of our agents, or a local news-dealer, let us 
send you a Sample Copy. SUBSCRIPTION, postage prepaid $3.00 per year. 



We are the Largest American Publishers of and Dealers in 



There is no work relating to the tlieoretical or practical application of Electricity that is not either 
Published or For Sale by us. 

We will be pleased to furnish at any time full information regarding; the Latest ancl Best Works on 
any application of Blectrioty in which you may be interested; for which purpose, we maintain a 
Separate Department, the Manager of which keeps liimself at all times Familias with the Contents of 
every work published, at home or abroad, on Electricity and its allied branches. 

Any electrical book published, American or Foreign, will be promptly mailed to any address in the 
world, postage prepaid, upon receipt of price. 

Address and make drafts, P. O. orders, etc. payable to 

THE W. J. JOHNSTON COMPANY, 253 Broadway, New York. 
H. A. R. DIETRICH, Agent, 

(Contracting, locating, Ventilating and $anitary Engineer, 



INVENTOR AND PATENTEE OF 

H.A.R.D. Cast Iron Sectional Boiler 



For Steam and Hot Water Warming 
and Ventilating. 

Plumbing, tin and galvanized Tron Ulork. DockasD Stoves and Ranges. 



CONTRACTOR FOR 



Steam, Hot Water and Warm Air 



Heating and Ventilating 
Apparatus. 



A.S the moon arose I kissed her, 
'Neath the shadow of the tree; 

When the moonlight broke the shadow, 
She drew away from me. 
D the moon. 



T. F. F. 



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